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To nueter or not?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have a 11wk -12wk old male house cat. Is it true that if I do not neuter him he will spray in the house? And is it also true that if i neuter him he will not get as big? I have always wanted a big ol' tom.
post #2 of 25
Neutering him will keep him from spraying, which smells simply awful, and from any number of other problems. He will grow as large as his genes and nutrition let him, no matter what, but he won't develop the heavy jowls of an intact tom.

He will also probably live a lot longer.
post #3 of 25
Please get your cat neutered before he reaches sexual maturity. What Mr. Blanche said is right on the money. Here is a page with an overview of the advantages of neutering a male cat:

http://www.peteducation.com/article....&articleid=910

I once came across a page graphically showing the differences between an in tact male and a neutered male. If I find it again, I will post it here.

I know a cat that became much larger (erm...well...maybe much fatter) after his neuter (at about 2 years of age). Poor diet is a contributer to him being overweight though.
post #4 of 25
Get him neutered! I catsat an intact male - still a fairly young cat too, maybe around a year old - and he sprayed all in the room I was keeping him in. The smell was bad enough that it literally slapped you in the face when you walked into the door - its BAD.

In addition, you'll have a fighting male cat who wants to get outside anytime he smells a female in heat nearby. Plus, you expose him to risk of testicular cancer.

Getting him neutered really is the best thing for both him and you. He'll thank you for it in his own way after you get him done!

My Chay is neutered and weighs at least 12 pounds - neutering didn't stop him from growing into a big, lovable housecat at all!
post #5 of 25
There are more health benefits of getting spayed/neutered then to keep a male intact.

First most males will spray in the house when they sexually mature. Kittens as young as 4-5 months old can and do breed! Unneutered males will constantly want to go outside to find females. This puts them at high risk for fights with other males (and vet bills), FELV, FIP, and a host of other problems they can encounter.

They can become aggressive if denied that. Neutering young prevents all of the above and also helps prevent early cancers. Neutering young will get you a taller cat (in some cases) and he probably won't have the male "head" that you desire.

But IMO the risks of keeping him entire and not neutering him now just cause you want to see a tom cat head/body on him is NOT worth it.

Please do him and yourself a favor and get him neutered by the time he's 4 months old. You both will be a lot happier in the long run.
post #6 of 25
Even though your boy is still a young cat, he will calm down quicker and you will both be happier if he is neutered asap.

I have found that neutered male cats, on a good diet, in loving homes, tend to reach their genetic potential...
case in point, my last two neutered males both grew to 16lbs of handsome cat.
post #7 of 25
I agree, if you have him neutered it doesn't mean he will be a small cat, mine is still a big cat. I think it will save you a lot of problems in the long run too. Also, a friend of mine said whats worth, being neutered and not being interested, or not being neutered but being frustrated coz you can't do anything. Your cat, if left in tact will do anything to get out and go for a cat in heat. Also, they won't come back for ages, they'll just roam about looking for a kitty.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
There are more health benefits of getting spayed/neutered then to keep a male intact.

First most males will spray in the house when they sexually mature. Kittens as young as 4-5 months old can and do breed! Unneutered males will constantly want to go outside to find females. This puts them at high risk for fights with other males (and vet bills), FELV, FIP, and a host of other problems they can encounter.

They can become aggressive if denied that. Neutering young prevents all of the above and also helps prevent early cancers. Neutering young will get you a taller cat (in some cases) and he probably won't have the male "head" that you desire.

But IMO the risks of keeping him entire and not neutering him now just cause you want to see a tom cat head/body on him is NOT worth it.

Please do him and yourself a favor and get him neutered by the time he's 4 months old. You both will be a lot happier in the long run.
Everything stated above. And also to add my personal experience. A cat will still reach it's full grown size based on it's genetics. I've had two males neutered at 8-10 weeks. One grew to a huge 15lbs (and he was very slim at 15lbs, not fat) but had a smaller head than an intact male would. The other is only 10lbs, but he has been small and lanky since the day he was born. So overall size is not dependent on whether or not a cat is neutered.
post #9 of 25
I had Yoshi fixed young and he was a big cat almost 15 pounds before he got sick.
Midnight my sister cat is a big cat also and weighs 15 pounds.
They are bothe way bigger then the parents.
Fixing did not make them small.
When a male sprays it is real bad and very hard to get the smell out.
My brother does have a fixed male that still sprays even though he is fixed.
I would fix him before he starts spraying.
post #10 of 25
well, besides the smelly problem and trying to get out, no one has mentioned what would happen if he did get out!!! what about all the kittens that could be produced?? with all the shelters so over crowded we do not need another intact male walking around! please neuter your kitty!

i can definitely vouch for a cat getting as big as genetics state and has nothing to do with being neutered or not. frodo was neutered at around 5 1/2 months and he still became a monster!! he is over weight at the moment (on a strict diet!) but the vet says he should be about 18 lbs! i would call that a big cat for sure
post #11 of 25
Hennessy's neutered (sometime before 1 yr of age) and he's still developing the jowls.
post #12 of 25
My kittens were neutered at about 10 weeks. They were hyperactive the evening after I brought them home, slept most of the following day, and were back to normal the day after that. At six months, they're about three times the size they were then.
post #13 of 25
Chester was neutered at 6 months of age (the vet wanted to wait for his testicles to distend). At the age of 4 now, I can tell you that while he is around 15lbs, the vet says he's still within a healthy weight, even if he is on the top end of things.
just because you choose to do the responsible thing, doesn't mean you'll end up with a small cat. It's all about the genetics.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandtigress View Post
My Chay is neutered and weighs at least 12 pounds - neutering didn't stop him from growing into a big, lovable housecat at all!
my Chip is currently 17 pounds - he's a couple of pounds overweight, but he's a really big cat! [& he's neutered, of course!]
post #15 of 25
Bijou was neutered at 4 months and he is now a large 18+ lbs Siamese handsome fella. He is twice the size of Mika, his full sister.
post #16 of 25
My three boys all got neutered about 4 months ... at 17 months Pj and Punky are about 13lbs ( not fat) and my 10 month old Sylvie long and very slender is 10.7
post #17 of 25
I do hope you have decided to get your cat neutered, he really will thank you for it. I have taken in adult entire males, and I can't see how anyone can live with one as an indoor cat due to the smell of their urine, and it takes weeks to get out, so muchbetter to do them before that happens.
post #18 of 25
Two other things I would like to point out that can happen if he isn't fixed is 1) if he you let him be indoor/outdoor he will wonder MUCH farther, and will have a bigger chance of being gone for up to a week (or more) at a time, a problem that doesn't happen alot with fixed cats and 2) he won't be as friendly as he would be if fixed. That one surprised me a bit when I learned that, but they do tend to be a bit more cuddly
post #19 of 25
As in your other post, if he is 'done' then he will be calmer, his personality won't change but he won't be a boistrous. I noticed the difference with mine in that he was a lot calmer, I think it is definately the best option. Also, mine is indoor outdoor so I didn't see that I really had an option, although even if he just indoor I would still have him done.
post #20 of 25
Definately get him neutered!!! for one, you DO NOT want him to start spraying, so get him done before that starts! A common misconception is that a neutered male cannot spray. If he is fixed before he starts to spray, he most likely will never spray. BUT, if you wait to neuter him, and he starts to spray, getting him fixed may not stop him from spraying. That is why i got Monster neutered. I didnt want him to spray, because that is something I will not tolerate, but this is my BFs moms house, and SHE would not tolerate it, and i didnt wanna have to rehome him.

Oh, and dont listen to that about him not reaching his full growth. My Monster is HUGE!! and he has been neutered since last November. Also, it calmed him down ALOT. his behavior is so much better now.
post #21 of 25
I guess I'm another voice "in the chorus"...

I've got two brother kittens, (18 months now) that were neutered at ~ 14 weeks old. One is taller/lankier and about 13 lbs. The other is "cobbier", but doesn't have the massive head of a tom (still has a "round" head) he's about 15lbs now and they're not done growing yet

I have had none of the male-associated behavior problems with them...no agresion, no wanting to "bolt" out the door to escape. No major fighting, no sparying/mounting behavior.

My cat from the shelter on the other hand (assume he was neutered as an adult, or at least past when the hormones kicked in)... He has a larger head, but.... He tries to bite/mount the other cats and can be quite agressive with them, he tries to bolt outside. I have been lucky that he hasn't sprayed inside though (crossing my fingers). Because of the difference in his behavior and the other cats, I can only assume that he acts the way he does due to being neutered later.

IMO, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages... I believe the number one reason for cats getting turned in to shelters is spraying / improper urination, so please consider whether or not you'd be able to tolerate that...as the odds of an intact male spraying are probably 99.9%. I've had to clean up pee spots from my cats UTI before...and believe me, even with a good cleaner (and considering that altered cat pee doesn't stink like intact male pee) it has been awful trying to get it out. I'm about given up on my futon cover...

If I were you, I'd get the kitten neutered, and if you really, really want a cat that looks like a tom...go to your local shelter and get a neutered adult male...but make sure you ask specifically if he will spray inside and/or be agressive with the other cats. Also, getting even a kitten with a rounder head and wider muzzle will give you at least a better chance of getting an adult with a larger head.

HTH,
Art
post #22 of 25
btw, funny 'big head' story - took Pixel & Firefox in for vaxes last week [they're quite disparate in size - Pixel weighs around 13 pounds, Firefox about 1/2 that] & the vet tech commented on Pixel's head size - asked if she'd been neutered! i said yes, & then she said, "well, it must've been late in life" to which i responded, "not really - she was 4 months old"... & then the tech said, "she's a girl?" it was on her form that she was female! poor Pixel - i guess she's just too masculine! anyway, head size doesn't depend on when the cat's fixed [or, evidently, even on gender!] - but on the genetic inheritance of the cat.
post #23 of 25
Neutered cats often get bigger than cats that are not neutered. That is because their long bones, like in their legs, grow as long as the growth plates on the end of the bone are open. Neutering delays the closing of the growth plates. (I have been to a lecture by an orthopedic surgeon for cats and he found that this can cause fractures in large cat breeds, but he said you'd otherwise have to delay neutering until 1.5 years of age and he strongly advised against that for the reasons stated by other posters.)

So your cat will not be stunted in his growth. Neutered cats truly make better pets, did you know that cats that were not neutered are for more likely to end up in a shelter ? Either because they tend to roam and get lost or because their behaviour is difficult to live with.
post #24 of 25
O…M…G get him neutered. I don’t know if yall remember the stray (thought he was a stray, turned out he was just a neglected cat with a crappy owner) I took in. He wasn’t neutered. He didn’t even spray, he was a good boy… but oh gosh!! His urine smelled so bad! We had him in the back of the house, in a room with the door closed and you could smell it all the way from the front door…even the front porch… I remember chatting with my neighbor on the porch... outside! and him asking me what the hell that nasty smell was lol. He didn’t even spray…it was just when he went pee in his litter.
post #25 of 25
It is a great idea to alter your male kitten. He will be a pet pet and a better companion to you for many years to come.
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