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Weight control

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Both my cats seem to have issues with weight... Snowball is too fat (apparently) and when we recently took Poppet to the vets they told us they could hear a heart murmur and she was too thin.

The vets told us to give Poppet wet food in addition to her normal food once a day, which we've been doing. She's only been on it for a month or so, possibly less, and she's absolutly ballooned - To me she looks and feels massive, much bigger than before she went to the vets. I haven't weighed her recently because I don't have scales that are big enough for her to stand on AND measure in small enough increments (before she went to the vet the scales told us she weighed the same as Snowball, but when the Vet used her animal scales there was a big difference). I don't know whether we should be still feeding her the wet food, since the vets have told us to (if we carry on I can see her being very big by the time we go back in a few months) or whether not feeding it to her would cause another loss in weight or what.

Snowball, on the other hand, is over weight apparently - Well, we've been told that pretty much her whole life, and we've done everything - minimal feeds, trying to get her to exercise more (she just won't), getting her to run around by tempting her with her combs then calling her back to another person :o Nothing works, she's still as porky as ever. I'm beginning to think she's a Six Dinner Sid She doesn't get masses of food (less than Poppet, and less than she used to get) but still manages to maintain herself.

Is there anyway to help them?
post #2 of 12
What kind of food did your vet put them on?
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseygal90 View Post
...Is there anyway to help them?
Yes.....if, unlike most people who post seeking "instant" spoonfed answers, you are willing to take the time to learn and - more importantly - understand about feline nutrition.

The easiest Feline Nutrition 101 to be found on the net is, IMO, on a website authored by a widely recognized feline Veterinarian, Dr. Lisa Pierson.

If you want to persue this further, here's the link to her article on feline obesity.

(That article is one of several on her site - the menu (pun unavoidable) is located on the right side. Each piece has a slightly different focus, but, if you make the time to read and think it through...then, YOU will be the expert.)
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillegal View Post
What kind of food did your vet put them on?
TBH over the years we've been told so many different things. The first vet told us to take them off of wet food because it was too high in calories, and put them on dry food (I think he recommended Iams, but I was only 9 at the time so I don't honestly know). Give them as much as they want. A year or so later and they're too fat, so we give them resticted portions. Next time we see the vet she recommends Hills because it's lower in Calories, still does nothing. Few years later and they're bigger than ever and we've been told to just cut down (again) on what they're being fed. Rinse and repeat every vet visit until last time where they told us to give Poppet wet food - any wet food, we've been going for Tescos home brand (we tried her with some Sheba, I think, that we got cheap but she wouldn't touch it) and still giving her dry food in the evening and morning, just not as much. At the minute they've finished all the Hills and are on Go Cat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAISE View Post
Yes.....if, unlike most people who post seeking "instant" spoonfed answers, you are willing to take the time to learn and - more importantly - understand about feline nutrition.

The easiest Feline Nutrition 101 to be found on the net is, IMO, on a website authored by a widely recognized feline Veterinarian, Dr. Lisa Pierson.

If you want to persue this further, here's the link to her article on feline obesity.

(That article is one of several on her site - the menu (pun unavoidable) is located on the right side. Each piece has a slightly different focus, but, if you make the time to read and think it through...then, YOU will be the expert.)
I've read through the basics of feline nutrition and am starting on the one you linked... With all due respect she sounds a little preachy. I'm willing to learn though, so I'll read the articles and give her site a browse.

The thing with Snowball is she has a very fussy stomach and can't handle wet foods... We gave her a little bit ages ago and she ended up in cat hospital for three days on a drip because it did something to her stomach. We can't give her chicken or similar because she gets diarrehea and feels awful for days afterwards. Not to mention the fact that we can't afford to go and get fresh meat for them day after day, I know that it's not an excuse but food prices and inflation over here are sky high.

Thanks for the links
post #5 of 12
I agree with Blaise here. Check out that link. Check tghe site out. Here is the main site link

http://www.catinfo.org/
Dry food I belive is where you problem lies.
Canned foods no gravy (gravy usually means higher carbs) would be best. If you can afford a grain free canned foods I think you will notice a difference in not too long a time
Best wishes
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
I agree with Blaise here. Check out that link. Check tghe site out. Here is the main site link

http://www.catinfo.org/
Dry food I belive is where you problem lies.
Canned foods no gravy (gravy usually means higher carbs) would be best. If you can afford a grain free canned foods I think you will notice a difference in not too long a time
Best wishes
Thanks. I'm a bit confused now though, all the vets we've seen (they've pretty much had a different one each time) have told us wet food is higher in calories and dry food is the way to go. Maybe it's a trans-continental difference?
post #7 of 12
FOLKS remember that different countries dont always understand US site s

Wet food ounce for ounce is USUALLY lower in calories... ave 85 grams is about 150-200 calories this is nearly = wt wise to a cup of dry food which on ave is 350-400 calories

Do you have a HOLISTIC or NATURAL vet near you??? They often have researched and studied nutrition more than the conventional vet s....

NOT ALL cats do well on WET or homemade diets ... YOU need to do what is best for YOUR cat /....
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseygal90 View Post
Thanks. I'm a bit confused now though, all the vets we've seen (they've pretty much had a different one each time) have told us wet food is higher in calories and dry food is the way to go. Maybe it's a trans-continental difference?
First, I think that, if you can gain a good understanding of what these little carnivores require for optimal health - the "layman's science" of it, if you will - then you can wisely shop for the most closely matching commercial product available to you. Depending on individual circumstance, that might include online suppliers.

(You commented on food prices, etc...I just wonder if, given the prices of cat foods, it might not be even cheaper to cook for our cats.)

That wise shopping would include contacting manufacturers and obtaining information on ingredients, protein/fat/carbohydrate content.

One last thing but, not to "micromanage" your learning - to really absorb Lisa Pierson's material, I found that I really had to "process" the points to properly digest ( it - it wasn't "skimmable" for me.
post #9 of 12
What does Snowball weigh at the moment?.

Have you tried the small tins of Hi-life

http://www.hilifepet.co.uk/osb/showitem.cfm/category/1

I feed my 3 on this along with Royal Canin Intensive Hairball kibbles, but i know they do a "light" version as well

http://www.royalcanin.co.uk/my_pet/c...terilised.aspx

I order my kibbles from Zooplus because it's much cheaper

http://www.zooplus.co.uk/
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseygal90 View Post
Thanks. I'm a bit confused now though, all the vets we've seen (they've pretty much had a different one each time) have told us wet food is higher in calories and dry food is the way to go. Maybe it's a trans-continental difference?
Your not giving as much detail as most would need to help you.

For example, I took my cats to a new vet I had been eyeing up for a while, its actually a feline only clinic.
My new vet recommended limiting my cats caloric intake to 160-170 calories a day (equivalent to about 5 oz of wet, or one can).

If your vet can't tell you what calories for your cats to eat, then they shouldnt be telling you anything.


Looking at your cats in the pic, the fat one does not look obese. Pics can lie so I would say if he is 15 US lbs or less there is no danger.

You should be more worried about your skinny cat with murmurs.


Don't forget one thing that I had to learn the hard way, there is alot of science involved in feline medicine, but beware of the tons of conjecture, nuance and opinion that can mislead.

One vet told me my cat was obese, and another said it was normal for his species (american orange tabby).

I had one vet tell me my cat was developing Gingivitis and that I should keep an eye on it (BIG MISTAKE) then my new doctor a year later gave me the bad news that she had full blown gingivitis. I took her to a dentist and she had to lose 5 teeth.
post #11 of 12
Thanks to Blaise's insight on another post, I can highly recommend a LOW LOW calorie wet food that is also excellent.

As you saw from my last post I converted both my cats to all wet. My fatter cat hated wet.

Anyways I used a new brand called Weruva (american company, with possible global dist) to get her switched over.
I had tried with some of the best quality grainfrees, but she was eating enough to take away her pangs, but not enough for sustinance.

Anyways, I avoided fish product for a long time, but knew my dry hating fatty wouldn't hestitate.

Luckily I was right, were in week 3 and she is eating Merricks chicken and turkey canned products.

Anyways, back to the topic, Weruva cans have 50-60% less calories than comparable American grain free brands (no idea what crappy brands have).
http://www.weruva.com/updates/faqs.pdf

I was shocked to find out thanks to BLAISE that the calories were so low.

At 50-60% less that means I would have to feed them double (hence my cost will go from HIGH to UNAFFORDABLE).

Here is my advice for your fat cat that won't eat wet, and most people here will hate me for it: Just force him, he will eventually eat, it took my cat 48 hours to switch. If he is apprehensive use the fish based cans. Feed him 1 cans a day till he drops in weight, if he doesn't drop than go back to the doctor.

For your thin cat, you said he blew up on wet? Sounds like he has diabetes, I have never heard of dramatic weight GAIN on cat. Either your doctor is going off some really narrow thresholds on what is fat and thin, or your not telling us something.
post #12 of 12
PLEASE discuss the wt issues with a vet ... Some of what is posted could be Dangerous

If you are unsure of the first vets thoughts get a second opinion... LOW cal diets NEED to be monitored closely by a vet or a certified vet tech specializing in wt loss ....
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