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woman ticketed for dropping f-bomb - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by calico2222 View Post
See, I don't agree with that. I think every citizen has a right to tell someone they think their language is offensive, just like every citizen has a right to use profane language (no matter how stupid or trashy it makes them look). Freedom of speech goes both ways. My dad always tried not to swear in front of my mother and me (didn't always succeed but at least he tried), and if we were in public and someone was using very profane language he normally would interrupt them quietly and inform them he had his daughter with him. Normally that would shut them up, or at least tone it down a little. Of course, that was back in the 70's. Now, I would be afraid to do that for fear of being shot, but it still feel that kind of language is offensive to others. I think he was perfectly within his right to say something, either as an officer, or as a private citizen.

And, I also have been in Wal-mart (more times that I would like ) and honestly to hear something being said in the next aisle it would have to have been said pretty loudly. A lot I supposed would depend on the time of day, but if she was stocking up for a hurricane I'm betting she wasn't alone in the store.
I'm not really sure what I said that you don't agree with. I used the words maybe and perhaps on purpose. My point was not that he didn't have a right suggest she watch her mouth. I agree with you 100% that he does. I just think that it is possible that he provoked her into that behavior and then used his authority to ticket her. He may have been annoyed at her language and overreacted. She used the word once, out of frustration before the officer confronted her. That may have been the end of it if he hadn't interferred. It is unclear to me exactly when she got out of hand, which, IMO determines whether she deserved the ticket or not.

I think she seemed trashy too, but I admit there are times I have slipped.
post #32 of 50
She's lucky.
When I was married, my ex was arrested (for what I can't remember, he was a bad man) after being pulled over.
I lost my cool because they were about to just leave me there with the car, which I couldn't drive.

I was not yelling, but I asked the cop what the "f" I was supposed to do with an "f-ing" car that I couldn't drive and how the H -E double hockey sticks was I supposed to get home?

He said no problem and arrested me for disorderly conduct.

I rarely ever swear in public and on the occasion I slip, I apologize to any who might have heard me, and I shut up.
Honestly, there really isn't a reason to conduct yourself in such a manner.

Letting slip is one thing, but to audibly be swearing, in front of kids no less, is good enough reason for a ticket.
post #33 of 50
I don't usually swear. I tend to use words such as "darn", "heck", "geez", "freaking" etc.

However, on the very rare occasion when I am really, really upset about something, and the "F" word is the only word that comes to mind to express how upset I am, I always stop and ask the person I'm talking to if they mind if I swear. If they say they don't mind, then I'll use the F-word ... once.

The first time I asked my ex that, he burst out laughing because he had never heard anyone ask permission to swear before.

I just don't feel like you have to have a potty mouth to be able to express yourself. I've been in public areas where I've heard someone cussing every other word they said. I really don't understand that.
post #34 of 50
I find it hilarious that this happened at a Walmart. Truly a classy joint.

I think she should have been ticketed if she started causing a scene. ( I have seen a few crazies in my lifetime.)

However she should not be ticketed for saying the "F" word.

I drop it all the time, and I don't care. I know the appropriate places not to such as church (won't be seen there), government buildings, and fancy restaurants ect. There's a time and place for everything but dropping the F bomb at Walmart isn't the greatest sin that goes on there.
post #35 of 50
I don't curse and I hate the sound of it from someone else's mouth. I think it is crude when people curse in public without any regard for the others around them. I have shot dirty looks at tactless people before when I was somewhere with my child in a family atmosphere. In adult situations I am less offended though people have told me that they feel funny cursing around me since I don't.
But in this case I think they are both wrong. He should have minded his own business. This was unusual circumstances in that this young mother was stressed out in an emergency situation. You see people all the time doing things you think are tacky and tasteless in front of their children. You walk away and be glad you don't have to be around them anymore.
But then she went wrong by overreacting. She said that she thought he was only a fireman so she was free and clear to start cursing like a sailor at him. At this point she made a choice to continue using foul language and the result is on her. She could have rolled her eyes and walked away without further incident but no, she was going to tell him a thing or two.
Instead of thinking of her child first she went off on some trashy rant therefore continuing her behavior and provoking her own arrest. She handed him a reason to arrest her.
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
She wasn't ticketed for public profanity. She was ticketed only after she started to cause a scene after the Fire Marshal asked her to restrain her language.

She was upset, angry, belligerent and causing a scene with her behaviour, that's why she was ticketed.
I agree with the posters that think they both were wrong. Look at Natalie__ca's last sentence. She was upset, angry and belligerent when confronted by a fireman in Wal-Mart. She probably felt overwhelmed and didn't know what to do to help herself. She had her baby to care for and maybe her mom was somewhat dependent on her. She lost it. That's not a real reason to punish someone. He could have offered to help her get the batteries she needed. Or maybe sympathized, or something. Instead he escalated a somewhat bad situation into a worse one.

I wonder what, if anything, she really learned from this situation. I also wonder what the fireman might have learned. Maybe they both should take some anger management or conflict resolution courses.

She may be trashy and low-class, but she was trying to take care of her family.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie=^..^= View Post
I agree with the posters that think they both were wrong. Look at Natalie__ca's last sentence. She was upset, angry and belligerent when confronted by a fireman in Wal-Mart. She probably felt overwhelmed and didn't know what to do to help herself. She had her baby to care for and maybe her mom was somewhat dependent on her. She lost it. That's not a real reason to punish someone. He could have offered to help her get the batteries she needed. Or maybe sympathized, or something. Instead he escalated a somewhat bad situation into a worse one.

I wonder what, if anything, she really learned from this situation. I also wonder what the fireman might have learned. Maybe they both should take some anger management or conflict resolution courses.

She may be trashy and low-class, but she was trying to take care of her family.
I have to disagree - nobody, regardless of how trashy or low-class, has the right to cause a public disturbance. This woman clearly needs anger management sessions. If she can't control her behaviour in public over a battery shortage, I'd sure hate to see how she is in private, especially with a child who can often wear on one's nerves.
post #38 of 50
He should have left her be. Sometimes in life you just have to ignore little things like that, it makes it easier for everyone to get along.
Just yesterday a customer slipped the f-word into what she said, when commenting on another family member causing her extra charges. I thought of this thread, of course. There were other people around, and a young child. I ignored it, so did everyone else, and I don't think she even realized she had said it. She was otherwise polite, saying thank you and such.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
There were other people around, and a young child. I ignored it, so did everyone else, and I don't think she even realized she had said it. She was otherwise polite, saying thank you and such.
Potty mouthed parents raise potty mouthed kids. There is no need to have a potty mouth
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
Potty mouthed parents raise potty mouthed kids. There is no need to have a potty mouth
Oh I agree fully. Though I watch my language far better than my parents do - I'm known to slip when I get hurt (the f-word comes out if, for example, I stub my toe because someone left a kitchen chair out and turned out all of the lights ), but that's it. Never in public.
But my morals, values, and even beliefs are different from other peoples and I hate when someone tries to force their's on me - so I don't try to force mine on anyone else. You don't have to like it, but sometimes you have to do things to keep the peace.
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I have to disagree - nobody, regardless of how trashy or low-class, has the right to cause a public disturbance. This woman clearly needs anger management sessions. If she can't control her behaviour in public over a battery shortage, I'd sure hate to see how she is in private, especially with a child who can often wear on one's nerves.
But the point I was trying to make is that she would not have ended up losing control, if the Fireman hadn't tried to push his "power" in her face. Yes, she did use an ugly word, but that was by no means worthy of being arrested. I'm sure if he would have asked her nicely to please not swear it wouldn't have ended up with her losing control. So called "authority" figures often don't ask nicely, they try to intimidate with their "badge" or whatever it is with Fireman. They threaten, and that WILL make an all ready upset person a LOT more upset. If he would have asked her as if he were a regular citizen and NOT as a someone who could and would arrest her, things I'm sure would have been a LOT different.

I'm not saying swearing is right, but it in itself is not an arrestable offense.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopeHacker View Post
I'm sure if he would have asked her nicely to please not swear it wouldn't have ended up with her losing control.
He did ask her not to swear. And that would have been the end of it had she just moved on. Except she didn't. She chose to verbally abuse the guy because she thought he was a lowly fireman, and then proceeded to cause a scene for which she was ticketed.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
He did ask her not to swear. And that would have been the end of it had she just moved on. Except she didn't. She chose to verbally abuse the guy because she thought he was a lowly fireman, and then proceeded to cause a scene for which she was ticketed.
It would've been the end if he just ignored her and not said anything. Most likely, she wouldn't have caused a scene if he had not said anything to her.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
Potty mouthed parents raise potty mouthed kids. There is no need to have a potty mouth
Actually, not true. My mother does not have a "potty mouth." My dad does, but he never said it around us when we were younger. I do have a so called, potty mouth, but I could care less what strangers think of me if they here me say it. That's what I choose to say, and I know the appropriate places not to say it. If I say it anywhere else, and people here it, oh well. All they have to do is ignore it and that's it. If somebody choose to say something to me, I would ignore them, not cause a scene like this woman.
post #44 of 50
If an officer ever asked me not to swear (and I wouldn't be dropping a f-bomb over batteries in Walmart) I would apologise and go about my business not start a huge scene especially when there is supposed to be a storm coming and you want to get home and your child safe.

Whether or not he had the right to ask her not to (and since other people may not want their kids hearing the f-word I think he does) she did not have to cause a scene and that was what she was ultimately ticketed for.

There is nothing to indicate that he did anything but say it wasn't the place for such language, which isn't unheard of when they have community police officers ahead of storms or during black outs because when the media has people worried about something it doesn't take much to cause mass hysteria.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopeHacker View Post
But the point I was trying to make is that she would not have ended up losing control, if the Fireman hadn't tried to push his "power" in her face. Yes, she did use an ugly word, but that was by no means worthy of being arrested. I'm sure if he would have asked her nicely to please not swear it wouldn't have ended up with her losing control. So called "authority" figures often don't ask nicely, they try to intimidate with their "badge" or whatever it is with Fireman. They threaten, and that WILL make an all ready upset person a LOT more upset. If he would have asked her as if he were a regular citizen and NOT as a someone who could and would arrest her, things I'm sure would have been a LOT different.

I'm not saying swearing is right, but it in itself is not an arrestable offense.
Hope, where did it say he "pushed his power" in her face or threatened her? Reactions like this woman's indicates to me she has a huge problem with authority figures. I may be way off but I get the impression that even if this man had gotten on one knee and begged, because of his uniform and her obvious problem with any uniform she would have acted out.

Any decent person, IMO, would be more ashamed than mad if someone asked them to not use the "F" word so publicly. I've been raised to respect authority - first from my parents and then from public figures. I have NEVER had a bad experience with any police officer or public servant I've ever encountered. I honestly believe that if you are a law-abiding, decent human being, nobody is going to just randomly have a go at you.

I'm reminded of a young woman who was shot by the police speeding away in a stolen car and how "innocent" this young woman was being made out by her community. I'm sorry - how innocent can you be riding around in stolen cars. I don't buy into all that nonsense. Normal, law-abiding people who don't have chips on their shoulders don't get hassled by police or authority figures.
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
Hope, where did it say he "pushed his power" in her face or threatened her? Reactions like this woman's indicates to me she has a huge problem with authority figures. I may be way off but I get the impression that even if this man had gotten on one knee and begged, because of his uniform and her obvious problem with any uniform she would have acted out.

Any decent person, IMO, would be more ashamed than mad if someone asked them to not use the "F" word so publicly. I've been raised to respect authority - first from my parents and then from public figures. I have NEVER had a bad experience with any police officer or public servant I've ever encountered. I honestly believe that if you are a law-abiding, decent human being, nobody is going to just randomly have a go at you.

I'm reminded of a young woman who was shot by the police speeding away in a stolen car and how "innocent" this young woman was being made out by her community. I'm sorry - how innocent can you be riding around in stolen cars. I don't buy into all that nonsense. Normal, law-abiding people who don't have chips on their shoulders don't get hassled by police or authority figures.

It actually doesn't say he pushed his authority on her, and unfortunately I am making an assumtion, and I'm judging my assumption on the way I've seen LAPD officers act, which is unfortunate. But 95 percent of all LAPD officers can make you hate the police and authority figures. They are brutal, mean people, whom I honestly believe get into the Police Force so they can Bully people. Now normally I don't think of Firemen as being like that.

I don't know if I have a chip on my shoulder, but I don't like Police at all. I usually like Firemen, unless they are trying act like Police.

In this situation, it just sounded like the Fire Chief was trying to act like a Police Officer, and intimidate her into not swearing with his Uniform. I could be 100 pecent wrong, but I just think she wouldn't have become so enraged if he hadn't tried to shove his AUTHORITY, in her face.

In truth I am utterly and completely Terrified of Police Officers. I usually think of Firemen as our friends.
post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopeHacker View Post
It actually doesn't say he pushed his authority on her, and unfortunately I am making an assumtion, and I'm judging my assumption on the way I've seen LAPD officers act, which is unfortunate. But 95 percent of all LAPD officers can make you hate the police and authority figures. They are brutal, mean people, whom I honestly believe get into the Police Force so they can Bully people. Now normally I don't think of Firemen as being like that.

I don't know if I have a chip on my shoulder, but I don't like Police at all. I usually like Firemen, unless they are trying act like Police.

In this situation, it just sounded like the Fire Chief was trying to act like a Police Officer, and intimidate her into not swearing with his Uniform. I could be 100 pecent wrong, but I just think she wouldn't have become so enraged if he hadn't tried to shove his AUTHORITY, in her face.

In truth I am utterly and completely Terrified of Police Officers. I usually think of Firemen as our friends.
Hope, I'm truly sorry to hear the police in LA are so bad. I thank my lucky stars that our Toronto Police Force are considered one of the best.

I find that often we all make assumptions when reading about happenings - it's part of being human and calling on our own memories of things that have happened in our own lives, both negative and positive. I suppose that's why we all have such differing opinions on things. Vive la difference!
post #48 of 50
I have met more Animal Control / SPCA officers who push people around with their authority than police officers, personally, so I don't have the same problem/ As far as I am concerned, they risk their lives for people and generally will have a good reason for asking for something.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
I have met more Animal Control / SPCA officers who push people around with their authority than police officers, personally, so I don't have the same problem/ As far as I am concerned, they risk their lives for people and generally will have a good reason for asking for something.
My experience is much the same Eithne but then we do have pretty great police officers in our area. I can certainly see how someone with experience with less than stella police officers would be afraid of them since they do have more "power and authority" than the average citizen when crossing swords with them.
post #50 of 50
Still I deal with Animal Control and the SPCA on a daily basis and despite the attitude I have seen them give people, they do a difficult job and serve a purpose to society we can't really do without, just like police officers so I just get on with it and get over their attitude.

Generally, if you are a law abiding citizen going about your business you have no reason to ever see or speak to an officer unless you deal with them on a professional level. I have lived in several countries and cities and never been stopped without there being an honest reason behind them asking me a question. I was once stopped coming out of work because they were looking for someone who looked like me. I was just running across to another building so had no official ID, just my security pass. Did they give me a hard time? Yes! Was it justified? Yes they showed me the security picture of the person they were looking for and she could be my sister. Small differences but very alike and dressed similar (not that a pink shirt and black pants are not common). I got over it and the people I was meeting with found great delight in the fact that I had somehow managed to rob a store in North Toronto while at work. A quick phone call to our security guards told the police what time I used my card to swipe into the building and they backed it up with a security camera and apologised for wasting my time.

I could be bitter about that but they had a good reason for stopping me and I am thankful that they are doing their job.
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