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I Furminated Gorilla.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I read about the furminator a while ago, and I decided to pick one up. She's really not a major shedder (I have to admit, I'm probably worse), but I didn't think it would hurt.

When I first tried it, she seemed really weirded out, and left. I gave her about 5 minutes, and tried it again. This time, she was actually REALLY into it, she started rolling around, so I could get all her sides, and rubbed her face all over it (I didn't let her touch the sharp bristle side). After a while, she started playing with it while I was brushing her belly. She seemed a bit irked that I didn't want to play back, so she walked about 2 feet away, and plopped down under the coffee table. Haha, I guess that means we're taking a break for now. The brush got quite a bit of hair out, and her coat looks shinier. I'd say I'm pleased, considering I'm not even done yet.

It's nice to know that this hair is going in the garbage, and not rolling around the house forming a little dust bunny army.
post #2 of 11
I have mix feelings about it. I got one this week for Talley and Zoey. The narrow tined comb that I use with great success on my longhaired dogs just isn't working on the cats.

The grooming end look suspiciously like the blade on my electric dog shaver. And the hair that came off was shorter than I expected - I'm thinking it cuts the hair rather removing loose hair. The sharp cutting edge would be the area between the tines.

My son is going to try it on his longhaired calico and see how it goes.
post #3 of 11
The Furminator doesn't cut hair. There are no blades, not between the tines or anywhere else.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of 4 View Post
I have mix feelings about it. I got one this week for Talley and Zoey. The narrow tined comb that I use with great success on my longhaired dogs just isn't working on the cats.

The grooming end look suspiciously like the blade on my electric dog shaver. And the hair that came off was shorter than I expected - I'm thinking it cuts the hair rather removing loose hair. The sharp cutting edge would be the area between the tines.

My son is going to try it on his longhaired calico and see how it goes.

It doesn't cut the hair, the reason the hair you're getting out is shorter than expected, is probably because it's designed to get at the undercoat. I think the long hairs that you actually see on your cat are called guard hairs (in dog terminology anyway) those are the hairs you usually see on your clothes. The undercoat is usually made up of shorter, finer hair, this is the stuff you can feel on your face after a cat's rubbed on it, but it's usually not as easy to see. In gorilla's case, her undercoat is even a different color. She is all black, but her undercoat is an ashy gray. The furminator also gets the loose hair out of the top coat, but there's not as much of it to brush off.

I've noticed that she is shedding much less this morning. I really do like this product.
post #5 of 11
The furminator is very similar to the blade on pet clippers or to a stripping knife. Some groomers use the clipper blade to remove the undercoat, so they basically took this idea and attached a handle. However if used properly the Furminator should not be cutting the coat but rather grabbing the loose undercoat and removing it. It does have the potential to possibly break the coat if used wrong though.
post #6 of 11
I'm used to using a comb and rake on my dogs - including Old English Sheepdogs, so I am used to holding them as the furminator directed.

And trust me, I know what removing undercoat is about - the OES are known for their undercoats - I get over a trashbag a week during grooming the girls.

I just undecided at this point.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of 4 View Post
I'm used to using a comb and rake on my dogs - including Old English Sheepdogs, so I am used to holding them as the furminator directed.

And trust me, I know what removing undercoat is about - the OES are known for their undercoats - I get over a trashbag a week during grooming the girls.

I just undecided at this point.
Haha you should knit a sweater! Maybe even a sweater for your dog, made out of its own fur.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieJerks View Post
I read about the furminator a while ago, and I decided to pick one up. She's really not a major shedder (I have to admit, I'm probably worse), but I didn't think it would hurt.

When I first tried it, she seemed really weirded out, and left. I gave her about 5 minutes, and tried it again. This time, she was actually REALLY into it, she started rolling around, so I could get all her sides, and rubbed her face all over it (I didn't let her touch the sharp bristle side). After a while, she started playing with it while I was brushing her belly. She seemed a bit irked that I didn't want to play back, so she walked about 2 feet away, and plopped down under the coffee table. Haha, I guess that means we're taking a break for now. The brush got quite a bit of hair out, and her coat looks shinier. I'd say I'm pleased, considering I'm not even done yet.

It's nice to know that this hair is going in the garbage, and not rolling around the house forming a little dust bunny army.
I wouldn't brush her belly with it though, the instructions say to avoid the sensitive tummy area.

I have one too and I like it but I am very careful with it on my cats. I don't go over and over the same spot repeatedly, and I also avoid the sensitive tummy area and the haunches. I'm also careful not to press down hard with it. So I really only brush their backs and sides with it. Rascal though I also do his neck, but he has that thick lion's mane

I don't use this tool every day. Personally, I worry that it could make their skin overly sensitive.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieJerks View Post
Haha you should knit a sweater! Maybe even a sweater for your dog, made out of its own fur.
There are people who save the OES hair and have it spun to make items. The catch is that it takes 25 lbs of hair to make a skein of yarn. There are different textures to their hair, which can it difficult to spin. My m-i-l tried it for me many years ago.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of 4 View Post
There are people who save the OES hair and have it spun to make items. The catch is that it takes 25 lbs of hair to make a skein of yarn. There are different textures to their hair, which can it difficult to spin. My m-i-l tried it for me many years ago.
I think I've seen something on TV about that a really long time ago. I think I'd try it, if I had a really large, furry dog.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shanynne View Post
I wouldn't brush her belly with it though, the instructions say to avoid the sensitive tummy area.

I have one too and I like it but I am very careful with it on my cats. I don't go over and over the same spot repeatedly, and I also avoid the sensitive tummy area and the haunches. I'm also careful not to press down hard with it. So I really only brush their backs and sides with it. Rascal though I also do his neck, but he has that thick lion's mane

I don't use this tool every day. Personally, I worry that it could make their skin overly sensitive.
I read the instructions a few times. I was really gentle with the brush, especially around her tummy. I figured that if it bothered her, she would have let me know. I'm not planning on using it too often, but as a once in a while thing, it is a really great tool.
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