TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Behavior › Do cats have seisures?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Do cats have seisures?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm worried about Roke,she was resting in front of the computer monitor as usual,and I noticed that paws and feet were twitching. I looked at her face,and her eys were open. I tried making noise to see if she would wake up,she didn't react. She snapped out of it a while later.

Should I be worried?
post #2 of 20
Was she lying on her side - in other words not standing on her twitchy feet? Could there have been a bird outside the window that she was focused on and not 'reachable' by you for a minute? Cats can certainly have seizures like we do, for different reasons. How old is your cat? You said her eyes were open, but that's why I asked about what else was going on at the time (bird?) because you can have open or closed eyes with seizures. I wouldn't worry about just the one incident though (in case you're misinterpreting what happened), but if there are more events, then see the veterinarian.
post #3 of 20
Cats sleep very deeply a few minutes at a time, and seem to dream. They can look "dead," completely limp, too. Usually they wake up shortly after that. This is entirely normal.

Cats CAN have seizures, but this "deep sleep" can have much the same appearance.
post #4 of 20


I would watch to see if it happens again, or if there are any other signs that she doesn't feel right.

My cats have managed to completely freak me out in the past by sleeping with their eyes partially open - paws twitching, sometimes with the 3rd eyelid across - looks really odd, but they are just fast asleep and dreaming.
post #5 of 20
Sport does this almost every time that he falls asleep. At first I was really freaked, because it does look like they are having a seizure. Paws twitching, nose twitching, 3rd eye lid up, dead to the world...he was is in fact dreaming. I just brought it up the last time we were at the vet, and the vet said that everything was cool. Best of luck to you and your kitty.

Peace, Love and Tie Dye ,
Rob & Sport
post #6 of 20
I had a cat that had seizures and you will know the difference between being twitchy and having a seizure. They are absolutely terrifying to watch. I would definitely keep a good eye on her and make sure she is ok after. Check her eyes to see if they dilate properly, offer her a treat so you can see if she is just sleeping deeply and knows what is going on.
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Yes,she was lying on her side when that happened. I told some local friends,and they reassured me that she was just having a nightmare in her sleep. That was the first time I seen something like this,that's why it scared me. Even though she can really get on my nerves,I care about her enough to worry.
post #8 of 20
I have one cat that has had a grandma sezure at 18 old. And yes, very terrifing to watch. My husband took Dakota to the vet the next day to be told this sometimes happens, and meds to help. After 3 months he was off the meds. As Dakota was never "normal" to us, we should not have been surprised but was. Dakota does not walk like a cat, with the feet following but with one foot not quite following it's companion. He also cannot come to a stop without "slidding" to a stop. Clumsey, shakes his head, falls over are all signs of our Dakota. With a very loving nature.

So yes they can, and it is very scarey. Glad yours is just dreaming.

post #9 of 20
If I were a betting man, I'd bet that your Dakota has a mild form of cerebellar hyperplasia.
post #10 of 20
As I have never heard of this cerebellar hyperplasia , if you have a web site, I would love to read more. Dakota also lost his "voice". You can only hear him purr if you lay your head on his tummy. As for meowing? only if he is mad at another cat and it is a high pitch-like scream.

Thanks, for the info, the vet never did say anthing more, and we do not have the money for any kind of specialist.

post #11 of 20
Kitty twitches alot in her sleep, and at first it really scared me! She also growls in her sleep sometimes, and when her eyes open a crack it can be very weird. But, cats can have seizures although your cat is probably just fine.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffee View Post
As I have never heard of this cerebellar hyperplasia , if you have a web site, I would love to read more.
I can help out with that, I have never had a cat like that but Wikipedia has a small page here - be sure to click on the link "This is Charley" in the external links section near the bottom of the Wiki page, it will take you to a youtube video of a very lovely and much loved cat with the condition, I've seen the video before and it is quite heartwarming. The severity of it can range from slight co-ordination problems and a bit of a wobbly head to severe mobility problems. Cats with this tend to be pretty normal in other respects (general health and in terms of intelligence etc) and can lead good lives doing normal cat things, sometimes with a little help.

PS I agree from your description that your cat may have this, probably quite mild, there's nothing that can be done to cure it and it sounds as if he has a good life so nothing to worry about, you have been blessed with a special and unique cat
post #13 of 20
I agree with the other posters who said your kitty was probably just chasing squirrels in a dream or some such thing, but I had a kitty who developed feline epilepsy -- a fairly rare condition I gather (I read that 3% of dogs develop epilepsy and it is much more common in dogs than cats, but I'm not certain how reliable that info is), but it certainly does exist and seizures are the primary symptom.

If you have any doubts, I would strongly encourage you to keep close watch and do a little research. My cat looked awake, but wasn't responsive, couldn't walk, would paddle with her front paws. According to my Red Cross Cat First Aid book, typical behavior for seizures is falling over, twitching, urinating, defecating, drooling. If it is a grand mal seizure, he may be still & rigid. If you have anything that looks like this, I would definitely say have your kitty examined by a vet asap and in the case of a grand mal seizure or recurring seizures (aka cluster seizures -- ones that happen in succession or by some standards more than 1 in 24 hours), that should be treated as an emergency situation. It is possible for a cat to die from a seizure as a severe, prolonged, and/or recurring seizure can potentially elevate the cat's temperature leading to brain damage.

You've probably got active dreaming, but I would keep watch if you have any doubts.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
I can help out with that, I have never had a cat like that but Wikipedia has a small page here - be sure to click on the link "This is Charley" in the external links section near the bottom of the Wiki page, it will take you to a youtube video of a very lovely and much loved cat with the condition, I've seen the video before and it is quite heartwarming. The severity of it can range from slight co-ordination problems and a bit of a wobbly head to severe mobility problems. Cats with this tend to be pretty normal in other respects (general health and in terms of intelligence etc) and can lead good lives doing normal cat things, sometimes with a little help.

PS I agree from your description that your cat may have this, probably quite mild, there's nothing that can be done to cure it and it sounds as if he has a good life so nothing to worry about, you have been blessed with a special and unique cat
I just watched the video about Charlie, what a beautiful kitty!! I've never heard of CH before. I think I teared up a little watching it, what a great vid.

Oh and my kitties also have little leg spasms when they sleep. I think it's because they are dreaming about who knows what, chasing birds, eating yummy food, who knows. And I also heard cats can enter sleep stages and start dreaming very quickly.
post #15 of 20
Kristy,

Watching my Dakota is so cute. He shakes his head, falls over, watching him stop by sliding on both front feet. He is very loving and very protected of us. Tho Dakota does not walk like Charely does, he does have the back feet that does not follow is front ones.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffee View Post
Kristy,

Watching my Dakota is so cute. He shakes his head, falls over, watching him stop by sliding on both front feet. He is very loving and very protected of us. Tho Dakota does not walk like Charely does, he does have the back feet that does not follow is front ones.
aww, he sounds so wonderful and sweet

Sometimes people don't want pets with disabilities or problems, but I don't see why not. If they are looking for love and companionship, a pet with an illness like CH looks like he'd be just as loving and companionable as a normal cat, maybe even more so.
post #17 of 20
As a professional pet sitter I see dogs with epilepsy all the time. After 10 years I've only ever met one cat with epilepsy. It affects her much differently than you might think. For one thing she's extremely moody which makes pilling her fun. For another, she has a number of symptoms that you don't see in human or canine epilepsy. She gets very disoriented from time to time. Sometimes her motor skills are off like she can't get her legs to work together (it's different from Charlie) but these things aren't permanent and at other times she looks and acts perfectly normal.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by howtoholdacat View Post
...Sometimes her motor skills are off like she can't get her legs to work together (it's different from Charlie) but these things aren't permanent and at other times she looks and acts perfectly normal.
Yes, the legs not working together was one phase of some of the last seizures my Maya had before I got her on meds. Her seizures manifested in somewhat different forms across time and her last ones clearly had distinct phases within a single seizure. Meds fixed her right up once we got the dosage, flavoring, etc. right.
post #19 of 20
CAt's "twitching" in their sleep and an actual seziure DO NOT look the same........
post #20 of 20
Nope they are not Kitty. While my Dakota was having his major seizure at 18 months old, I was holding him in my lap getting a full set of claws into my thigh.

My poor husband had to take him to the vet the next morning... and listened to the vet give the man in the next room holy heck over how badly he had been treating his dog. Hubby kept thinking, oh boy, he going to give me heck over not knowing why this is happening. The vet calmly told my husband that cats are born like this sometimes and we did nothing to "cause" the problem.

Over the years here in Central Fl we have had several cats(wild and ours) who will get ahold of something outside and next thing we know they are walking "sideways" with their head tipped over sideways. Here we use a soft tissue aantibotics for a week and whatever it is works wonders. For within the week the cat is "fine" and chasing the local rabbits again.

We are careful, as now we have two new dangers here in Fl for cats... coyotes(some fool introduced back into Fl thinking we needed them)....and pythons(that nice people buy as pets then let loose in the back yards).

Welcome to the sub-tropicals<sigh>

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Behavior
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Behavior › Do cats have seisures?