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Yearly Vet Visits - Is it worth it?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
We have not taken my (almost) 4 year old cat Dinah to the vet in about 2 years. The visits we've had before are very traumatic for everyone, she bites, hisses, spits, loses a TON of fur, etc. and because of all that, the vet basically gave her the vaccines, got a little look in one ear and that was about it. Also, last time we were there she got her rabies booster and her other vaccinations. Basically, my question is this: in TN we have to have rabies every 3 years, so we're still in the good there, and I don't plan on having her vaccinated again, so is it worth it to take her to the vet at all?

I just don't want to put her or me through that if it's not really worth it, especially if the dr. is not even going to be able to do a full exam. I should mention, she is a one pet household, strictly indoors and never comes in contact with other animals.

One other question, do you guys give a flea and tick preventative every month?

TIA!
post #2 of 25
can you have a vet come to you??

I dont use reg flea and tick as my animals are ill and neither is ahuge issue where I live
post #3 of 25
I think most of the shots can last about three years. The vet could tell you for sure.

My cats stay inside and I don't use the flea stuff unless I see a flea. I treat my dog regularly because she goes outside, so as long as I can keep the fleas off of the dog I mostly don't treat the cats.
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
can you have a vet come to you??

Good idea. I used to live in a town that had a mobile vet hospital (made out of an RV) but I don't live there anymore. There's nothing like that where I live now.
post #5 of 25
I do not use any flea stuff on my Cats unless I see alot of fleas which is Rare. My Cats stay inside. My younger Cats do not go to the Vet every. The older two go every year. Coco goes every few months.
post #6 of 25
As long as you keep to the vet's recommended schedule of shots, I don't see any harm in skipping the annual visits in between. (Though you should check, as there are certain shots cats in my area are supposed to get every year.)
post #7 of 25
I've often wondered the same thing. I take mine in once a year, even though they only need the shot once every 3 years. They basically weight them, check their ears. mouth, etc.....and charge like $40! Nothing I couldn't do myself. Also, mine are strictly indoors. I'm thinking about just taking them once every three years....unless they get sick.
post #8 of 25
My cats must be more cooperative , lucky for me- I just went Saturday with my girl - she was weighed, felt up all over, so to speak, eyes, ears and teeth checked, got her rabies shot and one immunization, nails clipped, and vet and I chatted regarding food, timing of her senior panels beginning next year, etc etc. Just a little fur was lost, but I thought it was worth the $90 (our county requires rabies shots, and we have rabid bats in Illinois - she's an indoor kitty, but accidents do happen, and I myself probably bring germs in every day from the outside world). I do like having her medical history in one place, and having a relationship with the vet's office - just in case of emergency.
post #9 of 25
The one reason I think it's good to take them for annual check ups is to get a blood test to catch anything when it's early enough to do something about it.

I have the same problem though with Swanie, he's a big strong cat and the vet basically can't do much to check him. The last time we had him in she had to sedate him to check him. I don't want him sedated for that, so I don't know what's going to happen when November comes around and it's time for his annual rabies shot (which I get for them under protest) and check up.

Home visits are an option here, but it doesn't seem like it would be any better for the cat, and it would almost be like an invasion of their safe area maybe?

I don't use flea stuff or heartgard because I'm not in favor of putting pesticides on my cats, or feeding them pesticides.
post #10 of 25
A few things especially about vaccinations
I do not think it is neceassry for a healthy young cat to go to the vets office. I do believe that once a cat hits about 10 years old, you should go anually for vloodwork an to check the teeth,
After the original vaccinations, not only do I believe that boosters add nothing to the original vaccinations, I believe they do alot more harm then good. Please check out the links. There is no proof that boosters extend the life of the vaccine and may actually shorten the duration. They can also kill or cause major health problems. I recommend the first set of vaccines for kittens and that is it. This is jmo
http://www.holisticat.com/index.php?opti[/url]...
I find these stats unreal
http://www.vaclib.org/legal/PetsDying.htm
and another
http://www.geocities.com/Petsburgh/F...cinations.html
post #11 of 25
I think annual visits are very important! My former roommate's 2 year-old cat died within a few hours one evening. It turned out that she suffered from a heart defect. My vet told me that that particular condition could have been easily treated with medication if she took her cat in for a check-up. However, my roommate is one of those people who think that if everything looks okay, then there's no need for a vet visit.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
A few things especially about vaccinations
I do not think it is neceassry for a healthy young cat to go to the vets office. I do believe that once a cat hits about 10 years old, you should go anually for vloodwork an to check the teeth,
After the original vaccinations, not only do I believe that boosters add nothing to the original vaccinations, I believe they do alot more harm then good. Please check out the links. There is no proof that boosters extend the life of the vaccine and may actually shorten the duration. They can also kill or cause major health problems. I recommend the first set of vaccines for kittens and that is it. This is jmo
http://www.holisticat.com/index.php?opti...
I find these stats unreal
http://www.vaclib.org/legal/PetsDying.ht...

and another
http://www.geocities.com/Petsburgh/Farm/...
I agree with the kitten but even my holistic vets say one booster and have multiple studies to aid in making a decision

your last to links are not working
post #13 of 25
I think a yearly visit is good to have their teeth checked. Gum disease can lead to many other problems.
post #14 of 25
The thing about regular vet check ups is being more likely to catch early signs of problems. It is just as important for a young cat as it is for an older cat, IMO. Nobody likes to drag an angry cat into a vet and pay $150 a year for a seemingly useless visit, but you'd be kicking yourself if something that could have been prevented happened to your cat.
post #15 of 25
Links are fixed in the op and here they are again, thanks
Vaccinations
http://www.geocities.com/Petsburgh/F...cinations.html

More
http://www.holisticat.com/vaccinations.html

Stats from a vet survey
http://www.vaclib.org/legal/PetsDying.htm
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteforest View Post
The thing about regular vet check ups is being more likely to catch early signs of problems. It is just as important for a young cat as it is for an older cat, IMO. Nobody likes to drag an angry cat into a vet and pay $150 a year for a seemingly useless visit, but you'd be kicking yourself if something that could have been prevented happened to your cat.


That's exactly why I will take Riley every year. I'm no vet and even if he seems fine there may be something a vet would notice that I wouldn't and I just won't take that chance.

Riley travels wonderfully, and has no problems with the vet so it is easy for me to say.
post #17 of 25
I'm a firm believer in yearly vet visits, regardless of a cat's age. I hate putting mine through the stress of it but, ultimately, it's for their own good as the vet has the knowledge to catch something I might miss. Even younger, apparently healthy cats can have issues that a vet will pick up on during a routine exam. With my youngest two, who are not quite 4-years-old, our vet picked up on a couple of issues that could have ended up being much worse if not addressed in a timely manner - severe gingivitis with Claire, and heart disease with Peter. Fortunately, a good dental cleaning did the trick with Claire, and with further testing and daily meds, Pete is doing fine.
post #18 of 25
Mine go every year. I have to go to the doctor every year, so they do too. There are things the doctor may catch that we didn't notice. And Nabu is 11 yrs old now, so he needs annual bloodwork and a thyroid check.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
can you have a vet come to you??

I dont use reg flea and tick as my animals are ill and neither is ahuge issue where I live
That's what I was going to say. Mobile vet clinics are GREAT!
post #20 of 25
Our cats go every year for their checkup. Luckily for us they are well-behaved at the vet and both enjoy the car ride.
post #21 of 25
I am always in favor of check ups, and although my last cat was extremely difficult, it's only once a year, and, as other posters have noted, an animal can seem healthy but have problems that a vet can diagnose.

Since my cat was indoors and an only cat, my vet eventually eliminated all shots except for rabies, and please don't stop getting those because, as he explained to me, it would be relatively easy for a rabid mouse or bat to enter the home, and it's a horrible death for the cat should she become infected from the rabid animal.
post #22 of 25
I do 6 monthly checkups on my oldies, with yearly bloods. Molly hates going to the vets but I do feel it is important, and it was very satisfying to know that she is in perfect health (according to her bloods) - it was also handy when she had a vomiting issue the month after - if we hadn't done them and known her to be healthy, it would have been a lot more worrying. Previous oldies have actually had monthly visits for weigh ins, but they aren't as important with these two, as they aren't overweight (one is underweight, but has only been here a week, so not too concerned yet).
post #23 of 25
I think I am getting taken advantage by the Vet.
I've had Lola now for 1 year (he's 3) and he previously had only gone to the vet twice... (kitten for vaccinations, and once for neuteruing)...

Now since I adopted my new boy Q-tip, I've taken him 3 times and he is only 15 months!

My vet charges in the past 3 months.

Q-tip - First vaccinations and wellness check $100
Q-tip - Booster shot and "Revolution" $100
lola- Thought he ate something and they did an Xray and antibiotics - $450 !!!
Q-tip- Just today for rabbies shot and pre-op for nuerting in 4 weeks - $200

So in 3 months my charges for my 2 boys have been close to $1000 !!!

And I knew nothing about "revolution" until I started researching and now I am supposed to be giving it to them every month !!

Can someone give me advice here ?
clearly I'm being taken advantage by the vet ? no ?

I don't really ask to many questions about what they are giving them and why and the cost, they just send me the bill 2 days after I leave and every time Im shocked.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinahGen View Post
We have not taken my (almost) 4 year old cat Dinah to the vet in about 2 years. The visits we've had before are very traumatic for everyone, she bites, hisses, spits, loses a TON of fur, etc. and because of all that, the vet basically gave her the vaccines, got a little look in one ear and that was about it.
It sounds like your Dinah and my Chloe were separated at birth! Our last vet visit was a three ring circus. The second the vet reached for her, she went absolutely crazy. He wasn't able to examine her at all. It took three people to hold her down long enough to get her shot and even then she managed to draw blood. And once we got home she couldn't get under my bed fast enough and hissed at me whenever I went near her for the rest of the day. It actually took her the better part of two days to calm down.

In theory, I agree with the people who say it's best to have a yearly physical done. But in reality, I just don't see that happening for my cat. She's just too scared and too aggresive. She'd have to be heavily sedated in order to have a proper exam and I'm just not sure it's worth stressing her out.
post #25 of 25
I think it's something best worked out between you and your vet. My vet and I discussed it and decided that my cats should go every 3 years when their rabies shots are due. I have many, many years experience with cats and other animals and my vet is confident that if there was a problem, I'd recognize it and bring them in.

I don't do flea or tick control on any of my animals. So far so good (4 years and counting) on not having any parasites of any kind. I was worried when I got baby Tres (who is getting HUGE!!!) that her fleas might spread to the other animals. I couldn't give her anything for them, and couldn't pick them all off, either. But now she has no fleas and none of the other animals picked up any fleas, either. I've never seen a tick on my dogs, but their pen doesn't have any grass so I guess they don't have a way to pick them up. Good thing, because ticks give me the creeps! I hate those things!
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