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Vet Recommends Dry (bagged) Food for Cats - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by darlili View Post
Kind of nice diversion when you're looking at that darn total charged to Mastercard!
I feel your 'pain'
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dale001 View Post
What’s the moral of the story? Do your own research, feed them well with what you think is best for your cat, and then you play the odds in life. That works with humans and pets alike.

Hopefully, with good nutrition and more importantly, love, pets and humans live a long, happy life.
‘nuff said.

Couldn't say it better myself....that's a good attitude...er...should I say...cat-titude.....
post #33 of 46
When my vet talks about nutrition for either my cats or dogs, I take it with a grain of salt. While they have a plethora of information on many amazing and complicated subjects, their feline/canine nutrition education is usually minimal.
My own research and the results of different foods for my animals have taught me to find out what I can and do what works best for us.
I'm very particular about what my cats eat, and I don't feed any grocery store cat food. I'm not someone who has much extra money, but I pay to get the best food I can afford, through what I've learned.
I can always give opinions and facts about pet food, but I totally agree that what matters is what works best for every individual situation.
Good luck with everything, and I hope you find what you're looking for.
post #34 of 46
post #35 of 46
My vet still recommends some dry daily for their teeth, but you get told off for feeding a cat with a UTI any dry food, and she doesn't even push the prescription stuff for UTI's, her theory is wet food only, extra water and minimise stress - has always worked well for my cats, the first cat actually got cystitis while on Hills C/D dry (his first lot was while on R/D dry), and he lost more weight on that 'diet' than the prescription weight reducing food. I wouldnt feed the diet my vet gives her cats though. I have an 18 yo who came back end of last year on purely dry food - her bloods showed her to be healthy, I get as much wet into her as possible, but she does generally favour dry than wet. I always have dry down, but it takes me a while to get through a bag, so I know they dont get a lot of it, and it is a premium brand, as is their wet food.
post #36 of 46
When I used to have my cats, I fed them Royal Canin for indoor cats (can't remember what number that is). They loved it.. It was their main food. Wet food was for occasional treats only.

When I have a chance in the future, I'd definitely wanna own cats again, so am taking the opportunity to read up as much as I can now. Not many people here seem to take to a raw diet (by this I mean fillets, definitely no bones). Is there any reason for not recommending raw feeding?
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyWukong View Post
When I used to have my cats, I fed them Royal Canin for indoor cats (can't remember what number that is). They loved it.. It was their main food. Wet food was for occasional treats only.

When I have a chance in the future, I'd definitely wanna own cats again, so am taking the opportunity to read up as much as I can now. Not many people here seem to take to a raw diet (by this I mean fillets, definitely no bones). Is there any reason for not recommending raw feeding?
I do. The vet clinic I go to believes strongly in a raw diet. The vets are fantastic, well trained and cutting edge. They don't sell Hills or anything but things to support raw feeding. I have been feeding raw for well over a year with their full support and guidance. Before that quality canned only. The difference is in my cats. Their coats are like silk and shiny. No dental issues. The only health issues I have ever had with them has been things beyond my control like when Cleo swallowed a string and when Mary was exposed to a cat with feline distemper. Lucia my Queen who just had babies was suffering horrible diarrhea and had a red hiney. I switched her to raw and the very next day it was gone. I have attended seminars run by vets about raw food and here we even have petstores that specialize in it for cats and dogs. My litter boxes do not smell and they use the box less often because they absorb the food better. But they urinate plenty which is what I want.
One time I gave them some dry because I was out of town overnight and I wanted to see if there was a difference and there was. The boxes were horrible smelling.
I have a background in human nutrition and I know that what the traditional standards are and they differ from what is really best for people. I have a brother who eats junk food only but is slim and athletic and never sick. I eat healthy but I got cancer. However I got ovarian cancer and most women die from it. I think if I had not been in top health in other areas I would have died. Survivors of that type of cancer is extremely rare. So I think of it as the same with cats. A hearty genetically blessed cat would probably do ok for a long time on low quality food. A cat with some genetic problem areas would not fare as well and most likely develop illnesses. But if both cats got the best diet possible then the hearty cat could live a longer and even healthier life and the other cat could have the same fate.
Cats in nature don't eat from a wheat fields or ravage fields of corn. They eat meat. So I try to mimic what they would choose in the wild. I even look at their food and ask myself if I were them would I want to eat what I am serving them. I have had so many people try to change me and I have gotten lectures but I feel good about it and I am sticking to it.
I also know that pet food companies are very powerful like drug companies are for people. They have a vested interest in keeping cats on kibble but even the old stand bys are starting to change their ways.

Bottom line is you do the very best you can for your cats. I think animal nutrition is an area that is slowly developing and as more research is done we learn more too.
Let us know what you decide whatever it is. I hope we have helped.
post #38 of 46
CC12, thank you very much for your comprehensive answer. I was afraid I'd get told off since there are plenty of discussions about commercial/raw feeding.

I should have been clearer, but I asked because Singapore isn't a very pro-animal country, so while the selection of dry/canned food is decent, I have not seen prepared bags of raw foods for cats (although I have seen at least one place stock prepared raw food for dogs... the strangest thing is that this place wasnt a pet shop but a supermarket).

This may seem like a darned clueless question, but would raw fish fillets be the very best thing for cats seeing how they like fish? What about chicken/beef/turkey (all boneless) and so on. Well, more specifically, what types of meat are you feeding your cats, and is there anything cat owners should look out for when feeding raw besides bones, and that the meat is fresh? I heard of many dogs having allergies to chicken, and am wary of the same thing being true with cats. Wonder if you could shed some light on this.

Btw, I'm very glad to hear you have won the fight against your cancer
post #39 of 46
NO raw fish is tied to parasitic and bacterial infections some fatel in cats...

IF doing RAW please read the threads and make sure to have the right percentages from meat bone and organ... meat fillets are a PART but NOT the whole to a raw diet

I have had a dog and a cat one allergic to raw but not cooked chicken and the other the opposite .. hence why I STRESS how it was prepared so much ...
post #40 of 46
Someone mentioned AAFCO...I want to say that just because a food is AAFCO doesn't mean much. It takes very little to pass certification...a small, rather short (I think 6 month) feeding trial, none of the animals involved can die from the food, and they can't gain or lose more than a certain (high) percentage of their body weight.

My vet is more progressive than a lot. He's actually asked for my opinion on certain foods. His clinic sells Science Diet and ProPlan, but as he told me "We know those aren't the only foods in the world." They also were pretty impressed with the difference in a dog they gave me. They had her for about 4 or 5 mos (her owners were going to dump her at AC because they didn't want to take the time to figure out what was wrong with her) and were feeding her Science Diet during that time. I brought her home and immediately (no mixing period) switched her to Canidae. She never had any sort of upset, and they are just amazed at how much better she looks. Nice and soft and shiny! Didn't take long, either.

I won't do raw. My vet isn't a big fan of it, and I just am not comfortable with the idea of my animals eating raw meat and then licking my kid. But they do great on high-quality dry food (Felidae) and a couple cans (also Felidae, usually, but if I get the job at the pet store I'll give them other high-quality stuff as well) a week. They are silky, don't shed that much, and don't make too much stink in the litter box.

I won't feed grocery brand foods, ever. I have yet to find one I like. If I couldn't afford to feed my cats well, I wouldn't have so many.
post #41 of 46
Hi
Actually when cats eat raw it has to be specially prepare unless it is just for snacks. they need the bone for example. Here are sites telling you how to prepare a raw diet
http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm
http://www.mousabilities.com/cats/fo...Today_complete
http://www.catnutrition.org/pictorial.php
For teeth health you can give raw chicken or turkey necks! best of luck

Do not rememebr if I posted earlier in this thread or not. I know passions on both sides of the wet and dry food debate run strong and mine are no different. They run very strong through experience. As far as I am concerned dry food for cats should be illegal! If you want to go to a site and ask a thousand owners of diabetic cats which food is better they will all say the same thing! Most of the cats there got diabetes from eating dry foods and most of them there have seen the difference when their cats are switched from dry foods to wet. Even the quality dry foods that are lower in carbs spike the blood glucose to similarly carb wet foods.
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by optionken View Post
Hi
Actually when cats eat raw it has to be specially prepare unless it is just for snacks. they need the bone for example. Here are sites telling you how to prepare a raw diet
http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm
http://www.mousabilities.com/cats/fo...Today_complete
http://www.catnutrition.org/pictorial.php
For teeth health you can give raw chicken or turkey necks! best of luck

Do not rememebr if I posted earlier in this thread or not. I know passions on both sides of the wet and dry food debate run strong and mine are no different. They run very strong through experience. As far as I am concerned dry food for cats should be illegal! If you want to go to a site and ask a thousand owners of diabetic cats which food is better they will all say the same thing! Most of the cats there got diabetes from eating dry foods and most of them there have seen the difference when their cats are switched from dry foods to wet. Even the quality dry foods that are lower in carbs spike the blood glucose to similarly carb wet foods.
I do agree with the spike .... thou the low carb drys do to potato likely spikes higher than a typical grain containg wet ...
post #43 of 46
Great info! thanks for the links and tips. I'll definitely know not to feed dry food in future I'm lucky that I don't have cats now, I have a wealth of time to read up now and prepare for getting a kitty.
post #44 of 46
My argument for wet is this. While many cats can live a long life on only dry or lesser quality foods, those that struggle with disease earlier in their life will more often than not benefit from a quality wet food. I fed nothing but dry for years.

When my OTB Bogart got CRF and we couldn't keep enough fluids in him, a wish I had been feeding wet.

When my Stumpy contracted an auto-immune disease in his mouth and had to have all his teeth extracted, I wish I had been feeding wet.

Now that Muddy has contracted FLUID, I am so happy that I've been changing them over to wet for the last few years. I can minimize his medications because he's eating the right food.

My vet sells I-VET dry and it gave my kids the runs. I'm trying to educate her on the topic of quality foods.

The argument between vets will last for a generation and the wet side will ultimately win. There are still vets who ask "do you want a declaw with their neuter?". The old school survives. Until vet schools change and start teaching about animal nutrician, there will always be vets pushing dry.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyWukong View Post
Great info! thanks for the links and tips. I'll definitely know not to feed dry food in future I'm lucky that I don't have cats now, I have a wealth of time to read up now and prepare for getting a kitty.
What sharky said is true. Fish is not to be fed raw ever. There are hosts of parasites. I give mine a can of Tiki cat tuna for cats once or twice a week. As for raw I feed turkey, chicken and duck. I use a prepackaged mix that adds all of the necessary extras, like bone and fiber...I cut my meat in chunks, mix it with some chicken livers and ground meat. I use all natural meats. I freeze everything solid. You have to freeze raw food to kill the bacteria effectively. Then I take some out and defrost in the refrigerator. You can keep it in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. But mine only lasts 2 days at a time.
I always have some prepackaged on hand in case.
As far as worrying about the bacteria being transferred from cat to person after eating raw it is not really possible since the cat's enzymes break it . But everyone has their own feelings. I have a friend who won't let her cats on her table or kiss them because they clean their bottoms. I am comfortable with handling raw meat, I do it when I cook for my family and I am extremely hygienic about it. I throughly clean and sanitize their bowls, eating surfaces, spoons and knives and my hands. Proper food handling is the key.

I do give chicken necks for treats but only 2 like them as treats so I give them treats that are compatible with raw feeding.

It is good that you are taking the time to learn and ask questions.
post #46 of 46
I'm glad I now know raw fish is a definite no-go. I'm definitely fine with handling raw meats. It would be a joy to prepare food that you know will benefit kitties... and will definitely give my future kitties all the kisses they can possibly tolerate
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