New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cat Types

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have been reading up one the various cat names
and find it quite fascinating that there's that many different names for
the patterns and such

at a guess id say my kitten's a

TortoiseShell Dilute Oriental Shorthair

am i anywhere near?

Most prob not

post #2 of 26
Close!
I'd call her a dilute Torbie (or dilute Patched Tabby), no Oriental Shorthair without papers to say so, but she definitely looks to have a foreign type
post #3 of 26
I would guess you are pretty much right on, although not knowing the background you can't really determine a breed so it is a domestic shorthair. But with those large ears and the body shape, oriental shorthair would be my guess as well. Although you typically put "dilute" before the "Tortoiseshell". but I think she is more of a patched tabby....

So Dilute Tortoiseshell or patched tabby would be my guess on the color
Oriental Shorthair is a good guess at the breed.
post #4 of 26
I'd call her beautiful!
post #5 of 26
I'm afraid I have no idea, but I just wanted to say she's BEAUTIFUL!
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
I didnt do bad then

The Mother's a Siamese and the father's a random tom

Im in the uk on sites i have looked at Oriental is a generic term used for a Siamese mix
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
She's the most clingy cat i have ever had
has a lovely temperament
she's sleeping on my shoulder as i type now
i cant move without her following
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shonk View Post
I didnt do bad then

The Mother's a Siamese and the father's a random tom

Im in the uk on sites i have looked at Oriental is a generic term used for a Siamese mix
Hi there! There are 2 different terms used here in the UK which shouldn't be confused. "Oriental-type", or more commonly "Foreign-type", refers to any cat, purebred or mixed breed, with a long narrow body, long limbs, an angular face, and large ears. "Oriental Shorthair" is a registered breed name and is only used for purebred cats with registration papers.

So your cat is properly described as an Oriental-type (or foreign-type) domestic shorthair, not an Oriental Shorthair - to be the latter, both of her parents would have to be registered purebred Oriental Shorthairs, or one parent pedigree Oriental Shorthair and the other pedigree Siamese.

It is a little confusing but I hope that helps clarify!
post #9 of 26
Blue tortie spotted tabby and white is her color. Blue tortie is the same as dilute tortie.

As for body type I'd call it foreign rather than oriental, this to avoid confusing it with the breed Oriental Shorthair.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol View Post
Blue tortie spotted tabby and white is her color. Blue tortie is the same as dilute tortie.

As for body type I'd call it foreign rather than oriental, this to avoid confusing it with the breed Oriental Shorthair.
I agree, I think the term Oriental-type leads to too much confusion. Even my vets office are confused by it and don't have Oriental Shorthair as a breed on their computer, hence my OSH boys are on their records as a "blue self Siamese" and a "lilac self Siamese" which is ridiculous, even if they are technically the same breed
post #11 of 26
I have heard the Turkish Angora people refer to their cats as having a foreign body type (long and lean) in order to distinguish it from the oriental body type (long, lean, and tubular) The term is nowhere in the TUA standard, but they do define the body type in their standard contrast to the tubular bodies of an oriental cat.
post #12 of 26
What about the white??? I would say "dilute tortoiseshell with white".

Well, except for the tabby markings. Where are Abymummy and Goldenkitty? They know the markings and colors for sure!
post #13 of 26
I'm here

I'd rather see a stretched out cat (both sides) to confirm markings before I comment on color! At this moment, I can only say I see a blue, cream and white which technically should make her a dilute tortie or torbie and white ...it depends on how much white there is and how "marked" (striped or spotted) she is as well.

As for body type again a stretched out cat will confirm oriental or foreign type.
post #14 of 26
facially, she looks a great deal like Java did as a kitten.

Java has a definite foreign or oriental body/face type, altho not as extreme as the current Siamese.


post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have tried to get some pictures just now
but she's determined to play with the camera







post #16 of 26
Definately a brown patched tabby (mackeral) - very very pretty markings. You might want to put her in a show when she's bigger
post #17 of 26
She's beautiful Not an Oriental Shorthair, but I would say has a bit of an Oriental look to her
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
post #19 of 26
I'll have to revise my color - thought it was brown at first, but she probably is a dark Blue Mackeral Patched Tabby/White.

I didn't know she had kittens! Was assuming you have gotten her spayed long ago.
post #20 of 26
She's a Blue Cream Mackeral Tabby and white or for Americans a Blue Tortoishell Mackeral Tabby and white. As a kitten she looked to have a bit of silver in her, but I'd say no looking at her all grown up. I also wouldn't say dark blue, that's a fabulous shade.

She's essentially the same colour as my Exotic, Flutterby - except Flutterby is silver!







Flutterby has been mated to two studs (one silver, one not) and has produced 8 out of 11 kitens that have been silver/smoke, although she is low grade herself.
post #21 of 26
Well some of the blue color looks dark, some light. I could tell better in person
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
She had the kittens last night

I think its better to let cats have 1 litter before having them done
post #23 of 26
For future reference, cats do not need to have a litter before being spayed. It's best to get them done before their first heat cycle, kittens can be done once they weight 2lbs at around 8-10 weeks old.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
i know they dont need to have kittens but i think its better for the cat

in the same way that its better for a woman to have a baby before
being spayed
post #25 of 26
Shonk, it isn't better for the cat, and could be worse - she could have problems giving birth, and you are letting her go through the pain of mating, pain of giving birth to take them away from her. They dont have maternal instincts like we do, so dont feel the need to have kittens. I have had so many mum cats who have been so much happier after the babies have gone and they have been spayed.
post #26 of 26
Aww those cats are all so cute. Very beautiful colors.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding