TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › Advice needed on dog collars
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Advice needed on dog collars

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I have a 65 pound chocolate lab 4 years old. Sweetest thing in the world EXCEPT walking on a leash. She will pull my arm right out of it's socket. She chokes on the collars, coughs like she is can't get enough air. It's so bad I don't take her for walks anymore.

Kisses and I went to puppy training and obedience courses. She passed everything BUT the pulling when walking. Oh yes and the stay command. They recommended these type of collars. http://www.petsmart.com/product/inde...ductId=2751371

They just don't work with her and I feel awful using it.

Is there something out there that I can use that would be strong enough to help me retrain her without choking the crude out of her?
I've thought about trying this one. http://www.petsmart.com/product/inde...ductId=2753698
Any opinions?
post #2 of 24
that first one looks awful!!!

I think you're on the right track, Eva, a harness would definitely be the way to go
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Katie the first is awful! I hate it! It has never left any marks on her but dang it just isn't the most friendliest looking collar. Even my vet recommended it though.
post #4 of 24
Try a front lead harness. It works wonders for most dogs. My dog was a puller but that thing stop that problem.

http://www.bebopusa.com/dept/harness.html

most people who use these just use the harness for the walk, but I actually use the least to attacth the harness to the id collar my dog wears. This gives you complete control of your dog.

And it doesn't look scary.
post #5 of 24
have you ever tried a martingale collar?

http://shoredog.com/Collars.html

The first one in the picture (under where it says fabric collars) is a martingale collar. I guess it is the same concept as a choke chain collar, but it is fabric so it is much much kinder. These collars are usually used with greyhound type dogs because their heads are so slender that they can slip out of a regular collar, but they have caught on with many other dogs because they are kinder than a regular choke chain collar. The only thing is that you cannot leave it on all the time (you still need a buckle or tag collar) because if the dog is left unattended it could catch on something and choke.

I think this is a good option to try (and there are many others out there, try k9closet.com). I am not sure that harness work for teaching not to pull.

Hope I helped a little and good luck.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breal76 View Post
Try a front lead harness. It works wonders for most dogs. My dog was a puller but that thing stop that problem.

http://www.bebopusa.com/dept/harness.html

most people who use these just use the harness for the walk, but I actually use the least to attacth the harness to the id collar my dog wears. This gives you complete control of your dog.

And it doesn't look scary.
I've never seen those. I might just try that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2raven View Post
have you ever tried a martingale collar?

http://shoredog.com/Collars.html

The first one in the picture (under where it says fabric collars) is a martingale collar. I guess it is the same concept as a choke chain collar, but it is fabric so it is much much kinder. These collars are usually used with greyhound type dogs because their heads are so slender that they can slip out of a regular collar, but they have caught on with many other dogs because they are kinder than a regular choke chain collar. The only thing is that you cannot leave it on all the time (you still need a buckle or tag collar) because if the dog is left unattended it could catch on something and choke.

I think this is a good option to try (and there are many others out there, try k9closet.com). I am not sure that harness work for teaching not to pull.

Hope I helped a little and good luck.
I have tried the collars similar to the martingale. Actually I use one on my basset hound. She can slip a collar faster than I can put one on her.
Kisses just continues to choke herself with it though.

I going to go check out k9closet.com. Thanks!
post #7 of 24
I have to disagee TOTALLY here.

I use a collar like the one you first posted. Its a Prong Collar. The prongs are DULL. They dont hurt. The collar can NEVER close enough to hurt the dog if its the right size for the dog!

I use it with my Rottweiler that is 115 pounds. He LOVES it! its never hurt him, and he knows when i get that collar out, its time for a walk and play!

It closes just enough for them to get the hint there doing wrong, but it never will hurt them! Its NOTHING like a choke collar. This one is made to only get snug, never tight. Its one of the BEST investments i have made with my shoulder having a retorn rotator cuff.

Before i tried that collar, i tried the harnesses, and other types of collars, but they always broke! this one is great!

I suggest before you pass it off, go to the store, check it out. you will find that the prongs are really rounded, and it dosent chinch!


Good Luck with finding a collar that works!
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2raven View Post
have you ever tried a martingale collar?

http://shoredog.com/Collars.html

The first one in the picture (under where it says fabric collars) is a martingale collar. I guess it is the same concept as a choke chain collar, but it is fabric so it is much much kinder. These collars are usually used with greyhound type dogs because their heads are so slender that they can slip out of a regular collar, but they have caught on with many other dogs because they are kinder than a regular choke chain collar. The only thing is that you cannot leave it on all the time (you still need a buckle or tag collar) because if the dog is left unattended it could catch on something and choke.

I think this is a good option to try (and there are many others out there, try k9closet.com). I am not sure that harness work for teaching not to pull.

Hope I helped a little and good luck.
We used these with all of our Borzoi (Russian Wolfhounds) and they worked wonders. Made training a whole lot easier on the dogs and us.

As far as a the prong choke collar goes, I've used them and found them to be very effective without hurting the dog. I've only used those on big fur type dogs, though (Alaskan Malamute and Great Pyr). So, my experience with these is somewhat limited.
post #9 of 24
I agree with Liza24 and Endorphins, that the prong collars definitely have their uses. They don't hurt, but you also have to remember that that is not why you're using them. You never pull it tight and hold. Just a quick jerk on the leash to get their attention.

But, they're not for everyone. I know a lot of my K9 SAR (search and rescue) team mates had dogs like yours. To train them, they need to be super excited and want to play the game, so they didn't want to diminish that drive with a prong or choke collar.

So, this is what a lot of them used:

http://www.sitstay.com/dog/supplies/...FQoDGgods1ApeA

I've never used it myself, but they seemed to like it!
post #10 of 24
A Prong collar works if used properly - however, on some dogs it simply does not work at all! You most likely used it right if shown how to by a trainer, but some dogs simply just don't get a prong collar. Martingale collars don't work for strong pullers, they work best for dogs who slip collars.

I like something like this, found in Wal Mart. It's a Sporn harness, I believe.
http://www.smartpakequine.com/images...arness_Red.jpg

Tried this one also, but didn't work so well because I hated getting it on right.
http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/holt-no-tug-dog-harness

Or else a Halti/Gentle Leader.

The Pro Stop one didn't hold up here. I've tried a bazillion types of no-pull harness, choke chains, prong collar, halti, etc. The Easy Walk Harness, I've got one I can mail to you if you wish to try it. I HATE the blasted thing. The front sags down, and it doesn't work for me. Actually, I could probably mail you a billion different types of harnesses & such that didn't work for my dogs to try. I've tried most all of them.

I highly suggest avoiding collars all together, as if a prong doesn't work for Kisses, then most collars are simply going to be ineffective, esp. if she's choking herself.
post #11 of 24
I use a Spoorn No pull harness on Bear.


Liza24:
You are right, prong collars are dull, but they do indeed hurt, they are designed to give a sharp pinch as a correction.
They work for the right dog, but for strong pullers, they are really painful and simply not worth it.
post #12 of 24
I have to agree with Natalie...

I used a prong collar with great sucess but ... since that didnt work for Ben either

The sporn was recommend by the pro trainer..... if you want a collar look at a slip lead( feed store

turned out Ben needed just some patience
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlyn View Post
I use a Spoorn No pull harness on Bear.


Liza24:
You are right, prong collars are dull, but they do indeed hurt, they are designed to give a sharp pinch as a correction.
They work for the right dog, but for strong pullers, they are really painful and simply not worth it.

i have to disagree. My rottweiler is a VERY strong puller, at 115 lbs, hes ALL MUSCLE. Once i started training him with that collar and treats, he was fine. Its more in the ability to train, then the collar i would say. a dog that dosent listen and keeps doing what HE/SHE wants, wont do as you want in ANY type collar. They need training first and formost.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liza24 View Post
I have to disagee TOTALLY here.

I use a collar like the one you first posted. Its a Prong Collar. The prongs are DULL. They dont hurt. The collar can NEVER close enough to hurt the dog if its the right size for the dog!

I use it with my Rottweiler that is 115 pounds. He LOVES it! its never hurt him, and he knows when i get that collar out, its time for a walk and play!

It closes just enough for them to get the hint there doing wrong, but it never will hurt them! Its NOTHING like a choke collar. This one is made to only get snug, never tight. Its one of the BEST investments i have made with my shoulder having a retorn rotator cuff.

Before i tried that collar, i tried the harnesses, and other types of collars, but they always broke! this one is great!

I suggest before you pass it off, go to the store, check it out. you will find that the prongs are really rounded, and it dosent chinch!


Good Luck with finding a collar that works!
I agree the prongs are dull, they don't leave any marks on Kisses. Believe me I have checked. BUT just pulling back to get her attention to slow down doesn't work with her. She pulls me when we walk, which chokes her the whole time. There isn't a time she isn't pulling.

It was recommended that I take her for a walk until she quit pulling. Just walk her until she is plum tuckered out. I walked from my house to my Mothers one day and back again. A total of 5 miles both ways. She pulled the entire time. No joke. Now when we arrived home and I put her through her clicker training. Sit, shake, speak and stuff. I really have her undivided attention.

I was once told that labs don't mature or settled down until they are 2 years of age. Kisses is 4 and still just as wild as the day I brought her home. I love her like crazy but I've really given up trying to take her for walks.


Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
A Prong collar works if used properly - however, on some dogs it simply does not work at all! You most likely used it right if shown how to by a trainer, but some dogs simply just don't get a prong collar. Martingale collars don't work for strong pullers, they work best for dogs who slip collars.

I like something like this, found in Wal Mart. It's a Sporn harness, I believe.
http://www.smartpakequine.com/images...arness_Red.jpg

Tried this one also, but didn't work so well because I hated getting it on right.
http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/holt-no-tug-dog-harness

Or else a Halti/Gentle Leader.

The Pro Stop one didn't hold up here. I've tried a bazillion types of no-pull harness, choke chains, prong collar, halti, etc. The Easy Walk Harness, I've got one I can mail to you if you wish to try it. I HATE the blasted thing. The front sags down, and it doesn't work for me. Actually, I could probably mail you a billion different types of harnesses & such that didn't work for my dogs to try. I've tried most all of them.

I highly suggest avoiding collars all together, as if a prong doesn't work for Kisses, then most collars are simply going to be ineffective, esp. if she's choking herself.
Thanks Natalie. Whatever I try it really needs to be thick and strong. I don't want it cutting into her. I've tried so many different ones that I'm now going to the expensive "training" harnesses used by the professionals.
post #15 of 24
I highly reccomend going to Wal Mart to get their no-pull harness to start. It's $10 or less, and works for me, so might be worth a shot!
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liza24 View Post
Its more in the ability to train, then the collar i would say. a dog that dosent listen and keeps doing what HE/SHE wants, wont do as you want in ANY type collar. They need training first and formost.
Well that just sucks because that means nothing is going to work for Kisses.

I do know that my ability to train her isn't the best but the teacher of the obedience class a few years ago had the same problem. She would always use Kisses as an example. Her advise was keep trying, keep trying.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by snosrap5 View Post
Her advise was keep trying, keep trying.
Please DO keep trying! You've been successful (it sounds) in other training areas, keep trying until you find something that works or it just "clicks." It obviously means enough to you to put this much effort into it - the rewards of your hard work and loving commitment will be worth it.
post #18 of 24
I have a 65 pound black lab and although she's 14 now and quite subdued, we always always used a roman style harness on her and it got her to stop pulling... I will never walk a pet on a regular around the neck collar... my neighbor's have a big golden retriever pup (about 2 or 3 years old) and he was a HUGE puller, so they got a head collar like the gentle leader and he does AMAZINGLY on it
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzbyJLC10 View Post
I have a 65 pound black lab and although she's 14 now and quite subdued, we always always used a roman style harness on her and it got her to stop pulling... I will never walk a pet on a regular around the neck collar... my neighbor's have a big golden retriever pup (about 2 or 3 years old) and he was a HUGE puller, so they got a head collar like the gentle leader and he does AMAZINGLY on it
I've tried the roman style harness and I think she feels like a sled dog. It doesn't slow her down a bit.

I google gentle leader and I haven't tried those yet. Thanks.
post #20 of 24
I heard martingles are better or a gentle leader collar or harness works wonders. I think prong collars are good too. Choke chains are horrible when it comes to training, IMO they aren't exactly humane.. martingles definately are but only use them for training/walking not to wear around the house.
post #21 of 24
I really like the Easy Walk Harness myself, though I've had the same problem as white cat lover. The one that fits properly around her body is a little big across her chest. They make in-between sizes that are supposed to help with this problem, but they don't sell them at any of the pet stores here, and I'd hate to order one online and it not fit. She has been trained not to pull, but if she sees a rabbit or something while we're out, oh boy! That training goes right out the door.

Have you tried the "be a tree" type method of training? Assuming you can physically hold still against the dog's pulling, that is. What you do is stand still, do not move, until the dog stops pulling. Then take a step, stop immediately if this makes him pull again. It can be incredibly frustrating at first. The first time I did it with my family's insane little dog, our walk was mostly done in one-step increments. But once he got the idea, it worked wonders.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
I use it with my Rottweiler that is 115 pounds. He LOVES it! its never hurt him, and he knows when i get that collar out, its time for a walk and play!
'

I am sorry but I really have to LOL at this comment.

Your dog loves going for walks, not the collar. Your dog associates the collar with going for walks. Hence the excitement.

My dog sees me grab my MP3 player and immediately get's excited thinking he is going for a walk. I wouldn't say he loves it.


I think prong collars are only okay if a person knows what the heck they are doing. Half the people that use them don't. I have to shake my head in discust everytime I see a dog come in as a stray to the shelter wearing a prong collar. tisk tisk.
post #23 of 24
I know it's a bit late. But I have a 60 lb Golden Retriever puppy (9 months old) and shes' terror to walk. We at first had her on a choke-type collar, except with fabric and chains. Didn't work AT ALL. Then we got the halti; it goes around the mouth and stops pulling. Worked well, but a hassle to get on and dumb people were afraid of her because they thought it was for biting. Finally we have a gentle lead and it's perfect, but she still cannot walk without it.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by K.J. View Post
I know it's a bit late. But I have a 60 lb Golden Retriever puppy (9 months old) and shes' terror to walk. We at first had her on a choke-type collar, except with fabric and chains. Didn't work AT ALL. Then we got the halti; it goes around the mouth and stops pulling. Worked well, but a hassle to get on and dumb people were afraid of her because they thought it was for biting. Finally we have a gentle lead and it's perfect, but she still cannot walk without it.
I'm going to pick up the gentle lead this weekend and give it a go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wishiwas View Post

Have you tried the "be a tree" type method of training? Assuming you can physically hold still against the dog's pulling, that is. What you do is stand still, do not move, until the dog stops pulling. Then take a step, stop immediately if this makes him pull again. It can be incredibly frustrating at first. The first time I did it with my family's insane little dog, our walk was mostly done in one-step increments. But once he got the idea, it worked wonders.
I've never heard of this but I'm willing to try anything. If I'm not strong enough I might have DH give it a try. He isn't as patient as I am though.
We may not even make it out of the yard.

Thanks everyone for the help. I will let you know how it goes.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cats and Other Animals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › Advice needed on dog collars