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My Grandfather's painting...long vent.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
This really bothers me, and I know its stupid but I can't help it. My grandfather (passed away 2004) was a very talented painter. He only painted for pleasure but he was VERY good. When I was growing up I remember him painting a fall scene of a local bridge and fell in love with it, so for my high school graduation he painted another one just for me. I was the first person he ever actually painted a painting for. After that, it became a tradition and he painted a picture of each of the other grandkids graduation or for wedding presents (some graduated before me). After granddad passed away, his paintings were distributed among the kids and grandkids (he had about 10 hanging around the house)

That painting is now haning above our fireplace mantel and looks beautiful. The funny thing is, Memorial day we had friends over for a cookout, and they said they saw a painting just like it in an art store downtown selling for $150.00. They said it was labled "from a local artist" but couldn't remember the name. As soon as I said my granddad's name, they said "That's it!". They were amazed after I told them it was my grandfather and showed them another picture I had from him that went to my mother.

Now, this means one of my aunts or cousins didn't care enough about my grandfather to keep this. And that REALLY bothers me. Especially since they are selling it in granddad's home town. They all live away from here, so why couldn't they try to sell it in their OWN town so I didn't have to know. I just feel like they are betraying him, or cheapening his work, which is stupid I know. I know you can't keep everything and lord knows I got rid of a lot of my parents' stuff but this isn't like getting rid of his favorite chair or something...this is something he created from his heart and can never be replaced. I've been tempted to call my aunt who handled his estate and ask who got that painting but I figure that would be opening up a can of worms.

It just makes me sad. If they didn't want it, why didn't they offer it to someone else in the family instead of selling it for a buck? I actually think my friends are going to go back and buy it and I'm glad. They appreciated it when they saw it, and now that they know who painted it, it means something to them.

Anyway, I just had to vent. Sorry this is so long.

BTW, here's a pic of his painting. The pic is pretty bad (cheap digital camera) but the painting is awesome in person!

post #2 of 11
That's sad, but like you said "you can't keep everything". You have the painting you liked the best. And once a person has possession of something its up to them what they choose to do with it.

I do agree, that maybe they should have asked other family members first before they sold it, but what is done is done. I don't really see how it would cheapen the artwork and saying its from "a local artist" - maybe someone in town has admired your grandfather's paintings too. I would let it go and don't worry about who in the family did it - you have your painting
post #3 of 11
cool painting!
post #4 of 11
You're right... whoever did that just doesn't get it about personal history and respect for family. He or she did not deserve to be entrusted with your grandfather's work.

But there seems to be someone like that in every family. The one in ours apparently sold off my grandfather's World War I uniform, my great-grandmother's beautiful old black Singer sewing machine, countless old records from the 1920s, and a number of clocks and paintings and other decorative items. These things weren't worth that much monetarily, but held a great deal of sentimental value for the rest of the family. All gone now.

I love to wander antique stores and junk shops, and so often, I find old photo albums for sale -- wonderful old photographs, some pre-1900, and pressed flowers and little locks of hair and delicately-penned love notes... all abandoned, and no one left who even knows who those people were. It's so sad.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
You're right... whoever did that just doesn't get it about personal history and respect for family. He or she did not deserve to be entrusted with your grandfather's work.

But there seems to be someone like that in every family.
You're right, and I'm pretty sure it went to one of my cousins...and while I know they loved our grandfather, it wasn't the same because they didn't live in the same town and saw him every week. They only came in a few times a year (if that), and the funeral was the first time a few of them had seen him in 5 or more years, so he wasn't a big part of their lives.

I can't really say anything...I got rid of a lot of stuff after my mom passed that now I'm kicking myself for, but we had to sell the house so everything had to be gone through so fast...or at least before I was ready. And, there's also a lot of things I kept and now think "why in the WORLD did I keep that???"

It had just been on my mind all week, and I guess it kept building and I finally had to vent.
post #6 of 11
My grandfather died when I was 10. He was a very experienced, albeit amateur photographer. His camera equipment was supposed to go to my mom according to his will. One of her brothers, who she trusted, asked to borrow the camera. He had it for a few months, then my great-uncle (ny grandma's brother) asked if he could borrow it. My mom said okay. He is a priest in Hong Kong and one of his parishoners was in need of a camera, so he just gave it to the guy! My mom was annoyed, but tried to not be mad at her uncle- he didn't do it to be malicious, he just didn't have the sentimental value to it and because of his lifestyle doesn't have the same mindset where he is attached to material objects. He's devoted his life to religion and his parishoners and gives them anything they need that he's able to. Plus he travels a lot so he tries not to collect many personal items.

I didn't find any of this until I was in high school and took up photography. I think I was more p-o'ed about it than my mom- sure would have been nice to have grandpa's camera!
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lsanders View Post
My grandfather died when I was 10. He was a very experienced, albeit amateur photographer. His camera equipment was supposed to go to my mom according to his will. One of her brothers, who she trusted, asked to borrow the camera. He had it for a few months, then my great-uncle (ny grandma's brother) asked if he could borrow it. My mom said okay. He is a priest in Hong Kong and one of his parishoners was in need of a camera, so he just gave it to the guy! My mom was annoyed, but tried to not be mad at her uncle- he didn't do it to be malicious, he just didn't have the sentimental value to it and because of his lifestyle doesn't have the same mindset where he is attached to material objects. He's devoted his life to religion and his parishoners and gives them anything they need that he's able to. Plus he travels a lot so he tries not to collect many personal items.

I didn't find any of this until I was in high school and took up photography. I think I was more p-o'ed about it than my mom- sure would have been nice to have grandpa's camera!
Awww, I can understand why your mom was annoyed and you were upset. "Borrow", to me means that you will get it back! But, at least it went to help someone.

It's funny...my grandfather was also into photography. In fact, mom inherited all his photography equipment. I have NO idea what I'm going to do with all that. Right now, it's stored in the shed probably getting ruined. But, my very first camera was my granddad's old brownie (at least, that's what I think it was...you looked down at the camera for the lens?). It took decent pictures for a 6 year old.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
You're right... whoever did that just doesn't get it about personal history and respect for family. He or she did not deserve to be entrusted with your grandfather's work.
I agree. No, you can't always keep everything, but you'd think they would want to keep something like that around. I completely see where you're coming from when you say it bothers you.

It's a very nice painting, also.
post #9 of 11
Oh my goodness! I can see why you are upset! I would be too! How awful they didn't just give it to someone in the family! A picture isn't hard to put in the closet or some place out of the way if you don't want to hang it. Shamefull.

He was a marvelous painter!
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post

I love to wander antique stores and junk shops, and so often, I find old photo albums for sale -- wonderful old photographs, some pre-1900, and pressed flowers and little locks of hair and delicately-penned love notes... all abandoned, and no one left who even knows who those people were. It's so sad.
I'm the same way...it always makes me sad thinking that nobody wanted these photographs and mementos. I always leaf through the albums and read the postcards, and acknowledge that the person existed, you know?
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by clixpix View Post
I'm the same way...it always makes me sad thinking that nobody wanted these photographs and mementos. I always leaf through the albums and read the postcards, and acknowledge that the person existed, you know?
Yes, exactly! I even bought one of those photo albums once, back when I had money.

But the most touching thing I've ever seen is an old postcard that I bought about twenty years ago and framed. It's a sepia-tone photograph of the back of a train disappearing between two big piles of rock in Indiana, and in very neat old-fashioned script, it says:

Can't tell when I will be home
Papa
It was mailed in 1916 to someone named Elizabeth in Massachusetts. So sad!
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