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Want to save endangered species? Eat them.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
This NY Times article makes a fantastic point. If we want to save native species of plants and animals we really should be eating them. A demand has to be created for people to save things. Besides that watermelon pictured looks darn tasty. I want to grow it.
post #2 of 9
Yea, that is true.
however some things, i have stopped eating sea bass.
cause there has been sooo much illegal fishing of them, that you cant tell what is legal and what is not anymore.
post #3 of 9
I noticed that one of our local grocery stores has been putting the country of origin on all its products displayed in the meat cases, as well as whether it was farm-raised or wild-caught. It's amazing how much comes from SE Asia. Like, for example, they had some huge, juicy-looking scallops from CHINA!! Boy, I don't know, since seafood is often eaten after only minimal cooking, I'd be leery.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
So the picture of the purple watermelon disappeared. Sorry about that.

I'm more inclined to do this with produce, simply because it would be easier to grow in my backyard (once I have one) and then eat at my dinner table. I'd also like my neighbors to peer over their fence and ask, "Hey, what's THAT?"

It would be a lesson in local preservation.
post #5 of 9
Pass the ketchup!


Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
I noticed that one of our local grocery stores has been putting the country of origin on all its products displayed in the meat cases, as well as whether it was farm-raised or wild-caught. It's amazing how much comes from SE Asia. Like, for example, they had some huge, juicy-looking scallops from CHINA!! Boy, I don't know, since seafood is often eaten after only minimal cooking, I'd be leery.
Seafood isn't as regulated by the FDA like beef and chicken is.
post #6 of 9
It's sad to know that's what it takes to save things in our world
post #7 of 9
Problem is that a lot of endangered animals are worth more dead than alive.

I've said it before and I fully believe it.

I don't know that eating them necessarily is the end all be all solution, but with the way the laws are, the only easy way to get products from these animals is illegally.

First we'd have to re-evaluate the laws that allow people to raise non-native/endangered/threatened wildlife in captivity before we should ever attempt to make products derived from these animals commercially desirable.

Something has to change. The current laws have been on the books for decades, and only in a handful of cases was there ANY measurable improvement. Most species at the least have not benefitted, many have declined. The system in place currently is failing, and recent years the attempts to patch it have only continued to make it harder to protect many species.

*shrug*
post #8 of 9
True - that is the reason for "Ducks Unlimited", "Quail Unlimited" and "Deer Unlimited". Sad that we can't appreciate a species unless it's used for food and/or sport
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme View Post
True - that is the reason for "Ducks Unlimited", "Quail Unlimited" and "Deer Unlimited". Sad that we can't appreciate a species unless it's used for food and/or sport
I don't think its so much that we don't appreciate the animals, but that many are worth more dead than alive. If we allowed properly managed, captive farming of some animals the ultimate end would be their death yes, but keeping them alive and healthy for a time becomes equally as important, and keeping a genetically diverse and healthy population becomes just as important. Make them have a value to being kept alive.




In Florida and Georgia the hunting season for Deer is a few months long, and has varying limits each year. The limits are established based on populations, and what the Departments of Wildlife deem necessary. Generally its 10 or so deer per hunter max. Some years they restrict it tighter, other years its an open season. Lately they've been restricting by gender more so than total number. Most hunters do not hit the limit, and even with the high limit. The states have been contracting individuals to cull populations more in certain areas. We've killed off most of the natural predators of these animals, and without that to check them, their population is growing beyond what the areas can sustain.

There are a lot of states that have restrictions on how many animals can be taken in a season, sometimes as low as 1 per hunter. In many of these states with low limits, the deer populations have grown so far out of control that entire populations are becoming disease ridden and the herd is suffering WAY more than they would if their numbers were better managed. Despite pretty solid evidence that increasing hunting in these areas to reduce the population, the various Departments of Wildlife continue the tradition of short/low count hunting seasons.

Again half the problem is that the animals that were predators to the Deer etc, have been essentially exterminated from the areas with population problems. Wolves/Cougars/Jaguars/Ocelots/Birds of Prey/Bobcats/Lynx/Coyotes/Foxes etc. Most of these animals were flat out eliminated by people that just did not understand how to coexist with them.

Whats worse is for areas like parts of California or British Columbia where the game populations have been pushed towards extinction, the predators have nothing to hunt and are becoming more and more aggressive towards people and pets. Which only makes people act irrationally in areas where the predators would thrive.

For animals that are endangered etc due to commercial desirablity of parts/peices of them. Creating captive farms of these animals, with health care standards etc would be the best method we have to both satisfy demand for them and protect the wild populations. Not much different that was done for Buffalo or fish.

If done properly the animals would not suffer unnecessarily and the world would not face losing them.

Attempts are being made by some folks, but are being met with a lot of resistance from people that just can't or won't accept that what has been Standard Operating Procedure for decades is not working, and we have to try something different. Restricting movement of these animals more and more is only exacerbating the problem.
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