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HELP! URGANT! I adopted a dog....And it's not going well - Page 3

post #61 of 72
Thread Starter 
Thanks again everyone. I sent an email asking about her....we'll see what they say.

I do agree that if she is to be adopted out they need to tell the adopter what her history is. You can't say "she's good will all sorts of animals" when she really isn't. That's a very dangerous statement. I'm sure she would have killed Stuart had I not been holding the leash.

*my hand is still swollen where she bit me over a week ago* (by the way)
post #62 of 72
Hmmm....maybe that group listing her now was listing her as a courtesty previously & just never got notified to pull her off? Cuz the listing is exactly the same...

I tried calling yesterday but didn't want to leave a message.
post #63 of 72
Thread Starter 
You know, I never thought of that...... Does it say when they listed her by chance? I didn't see anything, but I'm not sure where to look either.

I keep forgetting to save your number to my phone! If I had thought about it I would have called you back! I was volunteering when you called, otherwise I would have answered anyway.
post #64 of 72
It doesn't say a date....but I keep going back to look at the petfinder listing & wondering about it.
post #65 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miagi's_Mommy View Post
I agree. I will be sick if she is pts because of lack of options for her. she shouldnt be pts, she needs some extra loving and I disagree that she would be better off being euthanized, she's only a puppy and probably bit out of fear and nothing else. I just pray she isn't euthanized and can be helped. they aren't out of options IMO.

she can be helped if they are willing to try, if not she will lose her life. you see, this makes me very, very upset because so many people think pit bulls are bad dogs, they aren't most of the time they just have bad owners. it just sounds like this dog bit out of fear and nothing else.

I hardly call her a hazard if she just bit out of fear, it can be helped with proper training methods. I am just so sorry it didn't work out for you, but I just hope she isn't put down because she bit out of fear.

Has anyone here actually owned a fear aggressive dog? I own one. She was never abused, she's just an innately shy dog; she was even shy as a puppy, its the temperament she was born with (if she had been better socialized with strangers it probably wouldn't be as bad as it is today, but it would still be there). She is aggressive to strangers who come on my property, regardless if we tell her they are ok or not. She likes my friend Maggie, but if anyone else comes over, we have to put her away in my room, or babygate her in the TV room. She is not aggressive to anyone in my immediate family, she really quite submissive in nature. If I take her off the property, she is fine meeting people, although shy.

But, it is not an easy feat at all to own a fear aggressive dog. Fear aggression is one of the hardest behavioral problems to deal with, even for the experts. Often dogs with fear aggression are unpredictable because one sometimes doesn't know what will scare them and prompt them to react. I know, for the most part, which situations will set my dog up to fail but I have been surprised a few times. Having a fear aggressive dog is constant management, constant vigilance. I have never known what it is like to have a dog that is friendly, I have never known what it is like to let my guard down and relax with my dog around people. Our first family dog was a chesapeake bay retriever who was also aggressive to strangers (it wasn't fear though, it was protective instincts gone awry. - my current dog grew up with him, I think he taught her the aggression to strangers thing).

If a fear aggressive dog is put down, that is sad, but it is often better that way. There are far too few experienced individuals qualified to handle such dogs, and far too many dogs who need help. Most people don't need or want a dog that in all likelyhood will never be 100% trustworthy.

Ok, end of long rambling post.
post #66 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet72947 View Post
Has anyone here actually owned a fear aggressive dog? I own one. She was never abused, she's just an innately shy dog; she was even shy as a puppy, its the temperament she was born with (if she had been better socialized with strangers it probably wouldn't be as bad as it is today, but it would still be there). She is aggressive to strangers who come on my property, regardless if we tell her they are ok or not. She likes my friend Maggie, but if anyone else comes over, we have to put her away in my room, or babygate her in the TV room. She is not aggressive to anyone in my immediate family, she really quite submissive in nature. If I take her off the property, she is fine meeting people, although shy.

But, it is not an easy feat at all to own a fear aggressive dog. Fear aggression is one of the hardest behavioral problems to deal with, even for the experts. Often dogs with fear aggression are unpredictable because one sometimes doesn't know what will scare them and prompt them to react. I know, for the most part, which situations will set my dog up to fail but I have been surprised a few times. Having a fear aggressive dog is constant management, constant vigilance. I have never known what it is like to have a dog that is friendly, I have never known what it is like to let my guard down and relax with my dog around people. Our first family dog was a chesapeake bay retriever who was also aggressive to strangers (it wasn't fear though, it was protective instincts gone awry. - my current dog grew up with him, I think he taught her the aggression to strangers thing).

If a fear aggressive dog is put down, that is sad, but it is often better that way. There are far too few experienced individuals qualified to handle such dogs, and far too many dogs who need help. Most people don't need or want a dog that in all likelyhood will never be 100% trustworthy.

Ok, end of long rambling post.
Thank you for your great post. I whole heartedly agree with you. If someone who knows dog aggression very well adopted her, she would be fine. But how many people can adopt an agrressive dog and be sucessful. I don't want a dog I have to worry about, for those of you who own a dog like that thank you, but it's not something I could do. I don't know what the dog would really need and I would worry too much for the sake of other people. I would be terrified if one of the young neighbor kids ever came over to pet her while I was working in the yard not paying attention.
post #67 of 72
She is gorgeous, but I think you should take her back.. Her behaviour is not in keeping with her description so they'd understand.

My only concern is that she might be put to sleep if you admit that she bit you. Maybe just tell them that she tried to attack the cat, and that she really meant it, was in a frenzy. Then they'll be sure to rehome her to someone who has no other pets.

That or you could contact that guy who does 'The dog whisperer programmes' on Cable, he works magic!

Good luck whatever you decide, though I think your cats should come first, it is their home after all.
post #68 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by joyzerelly View Post
She is gorgeous, but I think you should take her back.. Her behaviour is not in keeping with her description so they'd understand.

My only concern is that she might be put to sleep if you admit that she bit you. Maybe just tell them that she tried to attack the cat, and that she really meant it, was in a frenzy. Then they'll be sure to rehome her to someone who has no other pets.

That or you could contact that guy who does 'The dog whisperer programmes' on Cable, he works magic!

Good luck whatever you decide, though I think your cats should come first, it is their home after all.
The dog got returned over a week ago.
post #69 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by joyzerelly View Post
My only concern is that she might be put to sleep if you admit that she bit you. Maybe just tell them that she tried to attack the cat, and that she really meant it, was in a frenzy. Then they'll be sure to rehome her to someone who has no other pets.
I'd just like to say....from the point of view of a person working at a humane society....not telling them a dog bit you puts the facility at liability, not to mention risks people's lives.

You surrender a dog....for whatever reason, and don't disclose the dog has bit someone, then the people won't be extra cautious around the dog. If the dog has bitten before, no one from the general public is allowed to handle the dog here. If we don't know the dog has bitten, we might send it on a walk with a family....what if it bit a kid in the face? The facility is liable (and could be shut down). In our case, if the facility was shut down, all stray cats/dogs would be euthanized after 5 bussiness days with no chance at finding a home.

Yes, I realize that telling a facility the dog has bitten often results is the dog outright being euthanized....but sometimes it has to be done. A lot of people will hate me for saying that....look at Jack in my siggy. He was euthanized for aggression. The person never told us he was aggressive, and he was placed in a home where there were two children under 12 years old visiting. He could've potentially done serious damage. It broke my heart to have to euthanize him....but if an animal can bite a person, they're a hazard and sometimes need to be euthanized.
post #70 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
I'd just like to say....from the point of view of a person working at a humane society....not telling them a dog bit you puts the facility at liability, not to mention risks people's lives.

You surrender a dog....for whatever reason, and don't disclose the dog has bit someone, then the people won't be extra cautious around the dog. If the dog has bitten before, no one from the general public is allowed to handle the dog here. If we don't know the dog has bitten, we might send it on a walk with a family....what if it bit a kid in the face? The facility is liable (and could be shut down). In our case, if the facility was shut down, all stray cats/dogs would be euthanized after 5 bussiness days with no chance at finding a home.

Yes, I realize that telling a facility the dog has bitten often results is the dog outright being euthanized....but sometimes it has to be done. A lot of people will hate me for saying that....look at Jack in my siggy. He was euthanized for aggression. The person never told us he was aggressive, and he was placed in a home where there were two children under 12 years old visiting. He could've potentially done serious damage. It broke my heart to have to euthanize him....but if an animal can bite a person, they're a hazard and sometimes need to be euthanized.
I do agree with you, we once adopted a dog from a sanctuary who bit me, nastily, and we later found out he had been to several other families before us and that he had bitten them all too.

However, this is a puppy, so a different circumstance I think. Also, once you had told them that the puppy had attacked a cat and recommended that she should only go to an experienced home, it is very unlikely she would be sent to a home with children with these tendencies. I think it would be very unfair for her to be killed without being given a chance when she's just a baby. I do see your point though...
post #71 of 72
i adopted a staffy/english bull terrier mix a few years ago. daley was 2 years old and we were told that like inky, he was great with all other animals and brilliant with people.

we had another dog leo, and 5 cats, one of which was a 5 month old kitten at the time.

apart from some mass destruction that him and leo did to my sofa, that i'm convinced leo instigated, daley was a perfect pet. we could take him anywhere and he was lovely with the kids.

2 weeks later, my partner picked up the kitten from the floor and out of nowhere daley flew at him and bit his hand. i saw this happen and was convinced that he was actually after the kitten. we were stunned as this was completely unprovoked.

my daughter was about 3 years old at the time and forever picking the kitten up. i dread to think what would have happened if she had been the one picking her up that day.

we had to make a decision for my daughters safety and the safety of all our cats.

the bite was bad enough to break the skin and if he had have caught the kitten then, well. it would have been the end of her.

we took him back to the centre the next day and made it very clear what had happened.

i was so sad as he was a beautiful dog and so friendly.

the centre acted responsibly and we later heard that daley had gone to an older couple, no kids or other pets, and with a long history of owning bull terriers. a good outcome for him.

i'm so sorry that you have been through this. we take these animals on as we want to improve their lives and give them all the opportunities they deserve, but sometimes through no fault of our own this goes wrong.

you did the right thing. i'm sorry your hand is still sore but thank goodness it was not worse. i don't need to spell it out.

as whitecatlover said, you are amazing for taking on a mix that so many people will pass by. get the right one and they are so wonderful to have.

inky is a product of her past, i just hope her previous owners don't have any more pets and that she gets a good outcome, whatever that may be.

for you.
post #72 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tab View Post
i adopted a staffy/english bull terrier mix a few years ago. daley was 2 years old and we were told that like inky, he was great with all other animals and brilliant with people.

we had another dog leo, and 5 cats, one of which was a 5 month old kitten at the time.

apart from some mass destruction that him and leo did to my sofa, that i'm convinced leo instigated, daley was a perfect pet. we could take him anywhere and he was lovely with the kids.

2 weeks later, my partner picked up the kitten from the floor and out of nowhere daley flew at him and bit his hand. i saw this happen and was convinced that he was actually after the kitten. we were stunned as this was completely unprovoked.

my daughter was about 3 years old at the time and forever picking the kitten up. i dread to think what would have happened if she had been the one picking her up that day.

we had to make a decision for my daughters safety and the safety of all our cats.

the bite was bad enough to break the skin and if he had have caught the kitten then, well. it would have been the end of her.

we took him back to the centre the next day and made it very clear what had happened.

i was so sad as he was a beautiful dog and so friendly.

the centre acted responsibly and we later heard that daley had gone to an older couple, no kids or other pets, and with a long history of owning bull terriers. a good outcome for him.

i'm so sorry that you have been through this. we take these animals on as we want to improve their lives and give them all the opportunities they deserve, but sometimes through no fault of our own this goes wrong.

you did the right thing. i'm sorry your hand is still sore but thank goodness it was not worse. i don't need to spell it out.

as whitecatlover said, you are amazing for taking on a mix that so many people will pass by. get the right one and they are so wonderful to have.

inky is a product of her past, i just hope her previous owners don't have any more pets and that she gets a good outcome, whatever that may be.

for you.
Thank you.
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