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Bruce has diarrhoea

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Bruce has had diarrhoea since Sunday morning. He is only going once or twice per day, but his stools are extremely runny, and the last one had a tiny bit of blood in it (I am guessing just from straining?).

He is a 15-month-old Mine Coon and appears otherwise to be in good condition (eating, drinking, urinating and playing as normal). His sister Sheila is fine.

They are free-fed Royal Canin Maine Coon dry food, and they are also fed wet food twice per day (normally Bozita, occasionally Animonda, Science Plan or Applaws). They also have cat grass, but we don't give them any titbits at all. They are indoor cats.

We have been using the 10kg bags of the dry food, and we were getting towards the end of a bag which had been opened for about 3 months (though airtight). I did wonder whether it could have been going a bit rancid, so as soon as I noticed his diarrhoea I chucked the rest out, sterilised the bowls and opened a new bag.

The other thing I wondered about was worms. They were last wormed in December (Stronghold). I have only been giving them their worm/flea treatment every three months as they are indoor cats so I perceived the risk of infestation to be reduced.

Does anyone have any suggestions? Should I take him to see the vet? Or just continue doing what I'm doing and only worry if he develops any more symptoms.

Many thanks

Bruce&Sheila
post #2 of 10
If you haven't changed their food and this is a recent happening, I'd certainly advise getting a vet check, especially with the blood in the stool. For sure take a fresh stool sample with you to the vet.

As for worming meds, I don't believe in worming every few months because it's a poison so unless they need it, I wouldn't give it to them. Did you recently worm him before this started?

At any rate, it wouldn't hurt to have a vet visit to rule out any serious problems.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your response!

My husband did the litter tray this morning, and said that there was no blood this time, though otherwise there was no improvement.

We did wonder whether he's trying to pass a hairball? He's been enjoying his cat grass more than usual, though there has been no vomiting. Is a hairball a possible/likely culprit? If so, is there anything we or the vet can give him to help him expel it?

I will ring the vet - no harm in a check-up just to be on the safe side.

Bruce&Sheila
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce&Sheila View Post
Thanks for your response!

My husband did the litter tray this morning, and said that there was no blood this time, though otherwise there was no improvement.

We did wonder whether he's trying to pass a hairball? He's been enjoying his cat grass more than usual, though there has been no vomiting. Is a hairball a possible/likely culprit? If so, is there anything we or the vet can give him to help him expel it?

I will ring the vet - no harm in a check-up just to be on the safe side.

Bruce&Sheila
I am no expert of course, but I cannot imagine a hairball causing diarrhea. One thing you can try while you are waiting for a vet visit is to try giving him some canned pumpkin, either by itself or mixed with his food (about a Tbsp/meal). Do not use the canned pumpkin PIE stuff, just the regular canned pumpkin. This should help firm up his stool.

When kitties do anything outside the norm, a vet visit is always a good idea since cats are very good at hiding pain. It's what they would do in the wild so as not to draw the attention of predators.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I called the vet this morning, and the nice vet nurse suggested that we offer him a 'light' diet for 24 hours, consisting of scrambled egg, cooked white fish or cooked chicken, and if he's no better in the morning, bring him in to see the vet.

Obviously Sheila is also on this 'light' diet! They are not enjoying it - they have strewn the scrambled egg all round the conservatory - anywhere but in their mouths! They have ignored the fish. I am saving the chicken for their tea in the hope that they will appreciate the change.

Regarding pumpkin, I'm doubtful that they would go near it - I have in the past fed them the Applaws chicken and pumpkin (which is just cooked chicken, cooked pumpkin, 1% rice and water) but they always liked it the least of all the flavours. But I could try it tomorrow if today's endeavours don't work.

He's still cheerful! I hope he genuinely isn't feeling any pain, rather than hiding it as you quite sensibly suggest.

Thanks for your help.

Bruce&Sheila
post #6 of 10
OK, I may be a little late in this response but did you first try pulling all food for 12 hours, then feeding a bland diet for 24 hours? I would take a stool sample to the vet. A fecal is not that expensive. I use chicken baby food for a bland diet. Cats can develop sensitiy to their food at any time. I had my cats on Wellness when Levi & Jordan were young. They did great for a couple months, then Levi developed terrible dirreha.
post #7 of 10
One thing you'll need to watch carefully is his hydration. Cats with diarrhea or vomiting can very quickly become dehydrated.

I would put some extra water containers around - in "different"/strange places...different kinds of containers too, as the curiosity/novelty often "inspires" extra drinking. If you're able to leave a faucet dripping from time to time - that may do the same.
post #8 of 10
I agree that a vet visit is a good idea, but if there's no clear diagnosis from the vet and it doesn't clear up after a day or two of light feeding, I'd try a probiotic. Lacto B is very good and I've found it effective in firming up runny poo

http://www.vetuk.co.uk/index.php?mai...81906afd7f0684
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. I fed Bruce a light diet for 36 hours (he did eat the cooked chicken, thankfully) and then reintroduced the wet food on Saturday and then added the dry on Sunday, and he's back to normal! He was drinking loads of water (and eating grass) throughout the episode so I wasn't too concerned about dehydration in his case.

Just to add some things to the discussion, my breeder suggested the following things to help cats with digestive problems, and I wonder whether anyone has any comments on their suitability and effectiveness:

* Tree Barks Powder from Dorwest Herbs (also called Slippery Elm - a natural product)
* Pro-Kolin (puts back the good bacteria in the gut)
* Goats milk yoghurt (also puts back the good bacteria)

She also said that some people she knows feed Iams Hairball variety dry food for cats prone to diarrhoea. I am not keen on the Iams brand in principle, but would consider it if Bruce developed a sensitivity to other food. I just wondered whether anyone else would recommend it, or what other dry/wet food (available in UK) I ought to consider trying if the problem crops up again?

Thanks again for all your advice over the last week or so.

Bruce&Sheila
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce&Sheila View Post
... my breeder suggested
* ....Tree Barks Powder from Dorwest Herbs (also called Slippery Elm - a natural product)
* Pro-Kolin (puts back the good bacteria in the gut)
* Goats milk yoghurt (also puts back the good bacteria)...
...some people she knows feed Iams Hairball variety dry food for cats prone to diarrhoea. I am not keen on the Iams brand in principle, but would consider it if Bruce developed a sensitivity to other food
Slippery Elm Bark...a definite YES! http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.ph...em=slipperyelm
Slippery Elm Bark Cautions:
Do not give Slippery Elm Bark at the same time as any other medications or supplements - it can inhibit the absorption of the medications. It is best to give it an hour before or after any other medications (especially antibiotics), and ideally on an empty stomach, although it is safe to sprinkle it on food if you wish.
Slippery Elm Bark also contains calcium, so it is probably safer not to use it if your cat has hypercalcaemia. http://www.felinecrf.org/holistic_treatments.htm#SEB

Pro-Kolin...sounds OK, a combination of what, in NA, is commonly known as Kaopectate (the old formula!), and a probiotic http://www.hyperdrug.co.uk/prodinfo.asp?number=PROTEXPK

Goat's milk Yogurt...I'll pass judgement.

Iams Hairball.....while there are advocates, I wouldn't bring it into the house! (This particular variety was the subject of a USFDA-ordered formula change in the Fall (I believe) of 2006, not long prior to the massive NA food recalls. The ingredients are hardly species-appropriate and, IMO, this 'hairball formula' isn't more than a slick advertising handle.)

I am not familiar with any of the other foods you've listed.

If asked, I would recommend the highest amount of wet, grain-free food you can provide and, (only if necessary) the minimalist quantity of grain-free dry food, so that the total quantity of food you are providing meets the required caloric intake of the cat. It sounds complicated, that last part, but...if you are willing to learn about feline nutrition, this article by a prominent Veterinarian will tell you all you need to know.
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