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What the current Administration thinks of the people's opinion

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Did anyone see this interview where Cheney was told the majority of the people in America think the war was not worth it and he said "so". then he went on to say that what the American people think is inconsequential.

I wouldn't have known about this if someone hadn't told me. I don't get cable news and I usually the CBS and NBC nightly world news because they are on at different times. I did hear anything about this.

http://thinkprogress.org/2008/03/20/perino-four-years/


Even China is reporting on it. I guess it supports their governmental view towards their own people too.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20...nt_7829907.htm
post #2 of 27
Here's a very interesting interview Lawrence Wilkerson, Colin Powell's chief of staff, just gave to SPIEGEL, one of the major German news magazines: http://www.spiegel.de/international/...542881,00.html
Please take note of this quote in particular:

Quote:
Wilkerson: I am convinced that the vast oil resources of Iraq weigh heavier for me now when I do the strategic analysis as reasons for the war than I thought back then.

SPIEGEL: Who do you mean specifically? George W. Bush?

Wilkerson: I am not sure. But I would be very interested to look at the documents chronicling Dick Cheney’s pre-war conversations with leading figures of the energy business and with oil magnates. Maybe one day historians will be able to get their hands on those documents and come to a judgment about that -- if and when the classified documents become open to the public.
Here an in-depth report on the source of the info, "Curveball", about "mobile labs", and the role Germany played : http://www.spiegel.de/international/...542840,00.html
post #3 of 27
After Enron was suspected of purposely causing the "rolling blackouts" in California, there was an attempt to get those documents released. Cheney claimed Executive Privilege. Eventually the truth of their complicity came out in other ways.

I'm still mad about that.
post #4 of 27
Similar thing happened in Australia with our former government. Really couldn't care less what the people of the country thought. That's why they got so utterly nailed at the last election. That kind of attitude tends to come back to bite people.
post #5 of 27
He's making a tremendous amount of money off the war. What does he care about? I'd be interested to know how much Halliburton (of which he is a major stock holder) has made for him.

I saw this last week and it's totally disgusting.
post #6 of 27
I doubt he's making any money on the war. He had to sell all his stock in Halliburton, and the remainder of his stock is in blind trusts.

However...while I think his choice of words were poor, I'm not sure I want another President who puts his finger in the wind before making any decision. Surely there must be a happy medium between the two poles.
post #7 of 27
They wanted to go into Iraq before Bush even took his oath. 9/11 gave them the opportunity to feed off of people's fear.

Leaders cannot lead by reacting to the opinions of the everyone, but have principles to guide them. Unfortunately for the Bush administration, it was so incompetent in executing his plans, we will never know if Iraq was a correct decision. I never agreed with the decision as I felt it distracted us from Afghanistan and crippling Al Queda. It gave Iran a dominant presence in the region which is more of a threat to us than Hussein's Iraq was at the time.

This was an administration that wants total secrecy and for us to just trust them. That in itself indicates that they do not believe we are deserving of consideration. We just wouldn't understand their superior thinking.
post #8 of 27
Elected officials who don't care what people think aren't doing their jobs. It's a representative democracy... I guess they just don't know what that means.

They've been elected to carry out the will of the people, not milk them for all they're worth.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrblanche View Post
I doubt he's making any money on the war. He had to sell all his stock in Halliburton, and the remainder of his stock is in blind trusts.
Take a look at this:
http://rawstory.com/news/2005/Cheney...last_1011.html
post #10 of 27
A stock option isn't anything, if it isn't exercised. And deferred income is just money that was previously earned but agreed to be received over time.

Believe me on this one: If there was anything illegal here, the Senate would have been all over it by now. Assuming, of course, that they haven't done the same thing. That's not possible, is it?

"It could be proven from facts and statistics that there is no native criminal class in America...except Congress." --Mark Twain

Analysts say that the Monica Lewinsky scandal is the only thing that kept Hillary from going to jail over her financial dealings. I'd call that wishful thinking, but it IS true that Hillary shorted pharmaceutical stocks just before announcing her health care proposal.

The main thing I've learned over the last 7 years is that there are just as many "conspiracy under every rock" radicals on the left as there are on the right. And I guess that's probably normal, and nothing much to worry about.

By the way...did you know that Bush's current approval standings and Truman's in 1952 are almost identical? And for the same reasons?
post #11 of 27
I had three extremely Republican people last night tell me that they regret voting for Bush because of his refusal to abide by the countries requests. All I could do was sigh.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
I had three extremely Republican people last night tell me that they regret voting for Bush because of his refusal to abide by the countries requests. All I could do was sigh.
And I had Democratic friends tell me the same thing about Bill Clinton at the end of his term.

I'm an independent, personally, but I do know this: However you may feel about Bush, others felt just as strongly about Clinton. Try to keep that in mind. And however you felt about Bush being elected, there are others who are just as honest, just as well-informed, just as much in love with their country who felt the same way when Bill Clinton was elected, and probably will be if either Clinton or Obama is elected.

That's the hard thing about our current politics. People have forgotten that you can disagree without being disagreeable, and you can be opposed without necessarily being wrong.
post #13 of 27
I think I may be tempted to ditch Dana.

Cheney just says what he feels. And NO ONE can say the American Public
isn't FICKLE.

Personally I always thought we should have come down harder, much harder on Sadaam when he tried to assassinate an Ex-President of the United States.
But I guess the POTUS at the time didn't really think that was to big of a deal.
post #14 of 27
Try looking at it this way. All that money that Cheney has made on this war has come directly from the pockets of the American taxpayers.

Kenneth Starr tried really really hard to find something to stick on the Clintons and he failed. And at that, it's not the same as starting and continuing a war that is lining your own pockets. War profiteering is making money from the death and destruction of other human beings.

The reason Congress has not come down on these guys is that the American public just shrugs their shoulders and says "whatever." We get what we want and what we deserve.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie=^..^= View Post
Kenneth Starr tried really really hard to find something to stick on the Clintons and he failed.
There's a reason Bill Clinton is also known as Slick Willy, and it wasn't because of what was going on with Monica Lewinsky. There were bunches of scandals with the Clintons, most of which had to do with money, not sex or perjury. But they were never able to prove criminal wrongdoing. Was that because there wasn't any or because they were smart and powerful (slick) enough to cover their tracks? I don't think we'll ever know the real answer.

While I am glad that Gore and Kerry weren't President, I can't say that Bush has been a good president. I have disagreed with his stances almost as much as I disagreed, ideologically, with Clinton. The 2004 election, I think, really was a "devil you know or devil you don't" election. There wasn't a good choice, just a less bad choice (as seen by either side).

For those of us with true traditional conservative beliefs (not the idea of socially "conservative" based on religious belief, which goes against the idea of getting the government out of the individual's business as much as possible), this administration has been a disaster, but I think we're really just starting to realize how bad it's been. Call it rose colored glasses or blinders, but it's getting pretty clear now.

If Republicans really thought Bush was doing the right thing for the bulk of his 2 terms, would we have voted to nominate McCain, who is SO different from Bush and has gone up against Bush numerous times?
post #16 of 27
http://www.commondreams.org/views05/1117-22.htm

This is a longer article about the war-profiteering of Cheney. No wonder he doesn't care what the American people think. He does whatever he wants to either way.

The last two paragraphs of this story are in a previous link.

Remember that this is American taxpayer's money going to Halliburton and the other companies like Blackwater, etc. that are being contracted by the U.S. Government.

Did you know that Blackwater provides security for high-ranking Americans who visit Iraq? Instead of American military with the American flag on their sleeves, it is private companies doing much of this work.
post #17 of 27
Blackwater are a bunch of rogue cowboys. Yeah, the majority of them are ex-special ops people but from what I've been hearing the military hates them. There have been a few instances of Blackwater firing at our troops, and of our troops returning fire against them.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie=^..^= View Post
Did you know that Blackwater provides security for high-ranking Americans who visit Iraq? Instead of American military with the American flag on their sleeves, it is private companies doing much of this work.
Much of the war has been outsourced to private companies. This leads to a lot of problems because their legal status and responsibilities have not been defined. They are not accountable to the military chain of command and it is questionable where they fall under the Geneva convention.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Essayons89 View Post
Blackwater are a bunch of rogue cowboys. Yeah, the majority of them are ex-special ops people but from what I've been hearing the military hates them. There have been a few instances of Blackwater firing at our troops, and of our troops returning fire against them.
One of the reasons that our military hates Blackwater so much is because they make somewhere in the neighborhood of 200k when they are over there. An E-5 Sergeant that's an MP (that's what my husband did) would make 32k. That's a huge difference for doing the EXACT SAME JOB.
post #20 of 27
I know I'm stepping into the quagmire here, but when I saw this article, it reminded me WAY too much of this. Cheney just said it more clearly than Hillary, but the substance is the same.

Clinton says: Pledged Delegates are Up for Grabs

Quote:
"And also remember that pledged delegates in most states are not pledged," she (Clinton) said Monday. "You know there is no requirement that anybody vote for anybody. They're just like superdelegates."
She wasn't as direct as Cheney, but she says the same thing, if not worse - what the people voted for doesn't matter, the delegates should just choose me anyway.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb View Post
I know I'm stepping into the quagmire here, but when I saw this article, it reminded me WAY too much of this. Cheney just said it more clearly than Hillary, but the substance is the same.

Clinton says: Pledged Delegates are Up for Grabs



She wasn't as direct as Cheney, but she says the same thing, if not worse - what the people voted for doesn't matter, the delegates should just choose me anyway.
Which brings me back to why I don't like the whole idea of the Electoral College!

At least U.S. citizens have some choice of candidates in the primaries; in Europe, the individual parties dictate "lists".
post #22 of 27
Clinton is wrong, and her desperation is painfully apparent. Hopefully she regains some grace any second now.

Saying that pledged delegates can change their mind is an miscarriage of the entire primary system.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
One of the reasons that our military hates Blackwater so much is because they make somewhere in the neighborhood of 200k when they are over there. An E-5 Sergeant that's an MP (that's what my husband did) would make 32k. That's a huge difference for doing the EXACT SAME JOB.
One thing is the same though: It's the U.S. taxpayer footing the bill.

All these private contractors are being paid for with our money.
post #24 of 27
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/...in575356.shtml

Gee, this tells a different story



Quote:
Originally Posted by katie=^..^= View Post
http://www.commondreams.org/views05/1117-22.htm

This is a longer article about the war-profiteering of Cheney. No wonder he doesn't care what the American people think. He does whatever he wants to either way.

The last two paragraphs of this story are in a previous link.

Remember that this is American taxpayer's money going to Halliburton and the other companies like Blackwater, etc. that are being contracted by the U.S. Government.

Did you know that Blackwater provides security for high-ranking Americans who visit Iraq? Instead of American military with the American flag on their sleeves, it is private companies doing much of this work.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
Yea, it adds more proof that Cheney is benefiting from the war.
post #26 of 27
Yup I heard it, am I surprised.... No! The Bush Administration has been taking this "I do what I want" attitude since they came into office. Why would they stop now?
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
Yea, it adds more proof that Cheney is benefiting from the war.

I guess you totally ignored the fact that Cheney is giving profits from the stock he holds to charity (and getting no tax benefit) and the fact that he is no longer receiving the deferred salary. Or maybe you didn't notice the article is from 2003 when he was still receiving a salary (which is something he elected to do before he became VP and before the war).

Maybe this article explains it a bit better.
http://www.factcheck.org/kerry_ad_fa...lliburton.html
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