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New Dog IF you can PLEASE assist

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am asking for help from those who know large HOUND dogs ... I have adopted a likely purebreed 8 yr old Red bone coonhound( HS called him a ridgeback lol ,,, I thought shep cross of some sort ) .... He look s exactly like a red bone and acts like one according to the sites I have read ... PLEASE help with any training tips... I have had mostly herding dogs ( ie off leash trained) and my yorkie who is very well trained ... Ben JUMPS things and DESTROYS toys .... I am getting a 8*8* 16 kennel for him so he can play safely in the yard ...
post #2 of 10
Hounds tend to be one track minds - they are hunters and will follow a scent for miles. Its not unusual for him to jump the fence and take off. They are also mouthy (howling) and tend to dig too. So if he doesn't jump the fence - he may dig under.

I'd get him into a basic obedience school/classes asap to help with the commands and for him to be better behaved. You'll have to really be the one in charge.
post #3 of 10
No ideas for you but I do want to say congratulations on your newest family member, Ben.
I hope that you get him calmed down soon.
Woof
post #4 of 10
Oh young hounds - a young hound is a wild child! Firstly, give him lots of exercise. Walks, runs, playdates with other dogs. Secondly, hounds usually love food, so grab some treats and keep training sessions short and to the point, because hounds have short attention spans. Always end training sessions on a positive note. It make take a longer for hounds to learn commands, but its not because they aren't intelligent. Hounds were bred to be independent thinkers out on the hunt, they don't wait for a human's commands, they simply track the quarry. You must be firm, but kind with a hound dog. You many never have an obedience champion, but you should be able to have a well-behaved dog that listens to basic commands.

I do know of a black and tan coonhound who excells at obedience trials, but he is atypical for his breed.
post #5 of 10
We've had 3 hounds, 2 of them greyhounds and the other was a scent hound (mix). The scent hound was very strong willed, very intelligent and always tried to do what she wanted to do. We used a very strong reward system for things she did good, and a tremendous amount of discipline when she did something wrong. I think the love controlled her better than the discipline.
post #6 of 10
Ear plugs?

I fostered Mandy the coonhound x......lots of walking & exercise. Keep him occupied with things like treat balls & kongs. Have him drag a leash when loose in the house.
post #7 of 10
Oh dear.....My step mom has a coon hound.....I don't have much advice other than, DO NOT let that dog do ANYTHING unless you ok it! That dog has gotten away with far too much and now she WILL kill anything smaller than her.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnzoLeya View Post
Oh dear.....My step mom has a coon hound.....I don't have much advice other than, DO NOT let that dog do ANYTHING unless you ok it! That dog has gotten away with far too much and now she WILL kill anything smaller than her.
If you are referring to smaller animals, it is typical of a hound to be prey driven, since they have been bred to hunt. If you are referring to human aggression, however, this is very atypical of a hound. Hounds are supposed to be very sweet and even tempered with humans.
post #9 of 10
At the age of 8 he'll be more a product of is training (or possibly lack of it) than any breed-specific traits I would think.

Normally like GoldenKitty said they'll take off to follow a scent. They need plenty of exercise - on the leash unless you have a large fenced in area.

You might have fun developing his nose for scent training:
http://www.flyingdogpress.com/scntgame.html
he should be a natural!
post #10 of 10
Hounds frustrate me, such stubborn dogs. You could try looking for hound enthusiast sites and forums, surely there would be great training tips there. I second getting him kongs and other tough toys. Since you've had herding dogs, a high energy dog that wants to go, go, go, shouldn't be too new to you. You have rabbits, correct? ... if so keep him away from them. He may have a higher prey drive then you're ready to handle and it wouldn't be something to risk. Crate him or lock door to the room they're in when you're away - same if you ever have young kittens (he may play too rough or accidentally step on one).

At age eight, he'll be considered older for a large dog. You know all the senior pet care requirements of course, but also keep an eye on his hips.

Good luck. It sounds like you'll have a handful, but I honestly believe you can train him. Let us know how it goes.
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