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Metacam question

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone have or had their cat on Metacam?

We have Beauty and Patches on it right now for arthritis relief. I noticed diarrehia once in the downstairs litter box and decided to keep watch on the box. Haven't seen any since.

Then today while the litter box was being cleaned a nice big pile of diarrihia was waiting for me outside where it normally sits. Seriously it was a lot for any of our cats.

I haven't noticed any in the upstairs litter box where Patches goes...Beauty mainly uses the downstairs box. Just curious if anyone has experienced this. I'm calling the vet about it on Monday since its twice in 2 weeks.
post #2 of 16
We used Metacam for Much's arthritis - she didn't have diarrhea but she threw up a lot. She's always had a sensitive stomach and this didn't go well for the long term. We've had better results with Cosequin.
post #3 of 16
Liquid metacam has some controversy surrounding it. There are sites that claim that it causes renal failure. There are others that adamently deny this claim. When you do a lot of digging and research on the topic, the truth falls somewhere in the middle. There have been cases with cats predisposed to renal problems having difficulty with it. There are documented cases where some cats have died from acute renal failure while taking it. But its like most medications. There will always be some one that has a bad reaction to it.

If you give it, watch your cat very closely and get to a vet if you see any odd signs at all.
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany View Post
Liquid metacam has some controversy surrounding it. There are sites that claim that it causes renal failure. There are others that adamently deny this claim. When you do a lot of digging and research on the topic, the truth falls somewhere in the middle. There have been cases with cats predisposed to renal problems having difficulty with it. There are documented cases where some cats have died from acute renal failure while taking it. But its like most medications. There will always be some one that has a bad reaction to it.

If you give it, watch your cat very closely and get to a vet if you see any odd signs at all.

I was going to post the very same caution!
I would only use Metacam short term, and only after I had done a baseline bloodwork for renal function. Of course, I have two cats with CRF, so I tend to be a bit paranoid. I think Metacam is good for acute pain, such as spay surgery, or, God forbid, declaw... where it is used short term, and usually on young, healty cats. Whatever you decide, do your research, so you know what to look for.


Unfortunately, I've also heard that Cosequin can cause diarrhea also. My mother cannot take glucosamine/chondroitin because of severe diarrhea, and she's tried many different brands.

It could just be a transient thing. You might want to try canned pumpkin, babyfood squash or peas, or adding Benefiber to the food, to help with the diarrhea short term. Good luck. Let us know what you find out at the vets!
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yes! Thanks! Our vet did warn us about Metacam not given the "A-OK" for us on cats. They are monitoring the metacam and noticed that her liver levels were mildly increased. However since the med is helping her its a "side effects outweigh the benefits" situation.

Like I said though I'm still calling the vet monday to get her opinion.

Unfortunately the Cosequin just isn't enough at least for Beauty. She's on both the Cosequin and the metacam....
post #6 of 16
Definitely call the vet as soon as possible. Raven was on Metacam (long enough to find out he couldn't handle it) for pain for his cancer. If we saw diarrhea or vomiting we were to call the vet right away. He had vomiting, and the Metacam gave him an ulcer.
post #7 of 16
Coco had the Metacam Shot last Nov and was ok but I would not use the Oral. She Hissed at me and screamed and she never does that. Her arthritis was hurting her very bad that day. I got scared after she had the shot because I read alot of bad post about Metacam.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Just an update for everyone - Beauty is physically OK. The vet checked her heart, organs, and did an anal exam on her.

I get to monitor the litterbox and watch for anymore diarrehia (yae) for the next few days and they're following up.
post #9 of 16
There's been another thread about Metacam...
http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=161497

Thought I'd mention it here so that anyone who participated in this thread may get the updated info.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany View Post
Liquid metacam has some controversy surrounding it. There are sites that claim that it causes renal failure. There are others that adamently deny this claim. When you do a lot of digging and research on the topic, the truth falls somewhere in the middle. There have been cases with cats predisposed to renal problems having difficulty with it. There are documented cases where some cats have died from acute renal failure while taking it. But its like most medications. There will always be some one that has a bad reaction to it.

If you give it, watch your cat very closely and get to a vet if you see any odd signs at all.
chilli was on metacam post surgery, he was unable to urinate.
post #11 of 16
In the UK, Metacam has actually been licenced for use in cats. I am debating it with a couple of my cats, just waiting to hear back from the vet. I have used it in senior cats before wiht no issues (and bloods taken after they had been on it showed no issues)
post #12 of 16
Hey, Villy my 10 y/o was prescribed Metacam for her arthritis, and I've tried it a couple of times, but each time she got a huge rodent ulcer on her lower lip / chin. I guess it's just really not for her. She has cosequin now, 1 capsule per day.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
In the UK, Metacam has actually been licenced for use in cats.
"In June 2007, the oral form of Metacam was licensed for cats for longer term pain management e.g. for use in cats with arthritis. The new feline version of Metacam is a 0.5mg/ml oral suspension compared to the canine version which is a 1.5mg/ml suspension...
Unfortunately meloxicam is nephrotoxic, i.e. toxic to the kidneys. In fact, it can cause permanent damage to the kidneys (papillary necrosis), with the result that a number of cats seem to have developed acute or chronic renal failure after taking meloxicam. I am therefore mystified as to why the drug has been approved for ongoing use in cats in Europe...."
http://www.felinecrf.org/causes_of_crf.htm#metacam

The European Medicines Agency http://www.emea.europa.eu/vetdocs/PD...-033-PI-en.pdf states (P36) "do not use in animals suffering from gastrointestinal disorders such as irritation and haemorrhage, impaired hepatic, cardiac or renal function." It also says (P103) that the use of Metacam should be avoided in dehydrated animals "as there is a potential risk of renal toxicity", and warns that the oral form of Metacam should not be used following use of the injectible form. http://www.felinecrf.org/causes_of_c...#metacam_links

Note that the concentration of the European feline "version" of Metacam is one-third that of the canine.

Quote:
I have used it in senior cats before wiht no issues (and bloods taken after they had been on it showed no issues)
What we pet parents need to be aware of is that blood chemistry testing after the use of Metacam may simply reveal that the damage has already been done. Secondly, once the kidneys are damaged, there's no going back. Kidney tissue can not regenerate, unlike, for example liver tissue. Thirdly, statistics for the occurrence of kidney disease in the general feline population run at about 30%. Given that fact alone, I am at a loss to understand why the drug would be used at all in young healthy cats.

Personally, I would "think long and hard" before using Metacam in a senior cat. I would have to have tried every other appropriate analgesic and pain relief treatment available before taking one step towards using it. I fully understand its use in terminally ill cats (e.g. cancer pain relief), and have personally seen the beneficial effects in such cases.

One further point - "most" pet owners have absolute faith and trust in their Veterinarians and will simply leave the choice of medication and other treatments to the Vet. Example: the cat becomes sick or is injured overnight - this is discovered in the morning - the cat is taken to the Vet and left for "appropriate treatment" - the cat is picked up after work, the bill is paid and the cat is brought home. I wonder, in how many of those cases is the pet "owner" contacted and told 'the Doctor wants to give your cat a drug called Metacam...the FDA states that this drug is not for use in cats...the Doctor believes the benefits outweigh the risks...can we have your permission to use the drug?"

Let me go one step further. Use the same scenario but, the pet parent is one of us here who has read through and given some thought to the information in this thread. It would seem that all of us here believe we do our "homework" and that we are more knowledgeable than the "average pet owner" who doesn't participate in a community such as CatSite. We are advised by our Veterinarian that our cat is in pain and that she/he would like to use a pain killer called Metacam on an off-label basis, that there could be side effects BUT that the Doctor will do regular bloodwork to monitor for any untoward consequences. For those us us who had previously accepted that there are serious concerns about such use of the drug, would we feel comfortable enough to decline out Vet's request? (Perhaps the whole issue of "intimidation by authority" is cause for a new thread?)

One thing I have done to (hopefully) ensure that this drug/class of drugs are never given to my cats inadvertently, is to have 2 notes put in the "Allergies" section of my cats' Vet files. These are: 1. "Metacam"...and 2. "ALL NSAIDs".
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAISE View Post
I fully understand its use in terminally ill cats (e.g. cancer pain relief), and have personally seen the beneficial effects in such cases.
That was the reason it was tried for our cat. We knew we didn't have a lot of time left, so the vet was thinking of the cat's quality of life. He reacted badly to it, so it was discontinued immediately.
post #15 of 16
I have only ever used it in senior cats (I only adopt senior cats), and i was aware of the risks - with the last cat who had it, it was the only thing that could manage her pain (suspected tumour - she had sickle cells in her knee joint, but as they couldn't treat it if it was, I opted not to go through with the biopsy), and sadly when she refused to take it, we didn't have long left as she wouldn't eat due to the pain. So yes, I am glad I used it, and she had bloods both before (as I do yearly bloods on mine) and during. IT was also the only thing that helped another cat I had iwth a leg issue (she ended up having an amputation), again, she had had routine bloods done before, and also ended up having them after.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAISE View Post
For those us us who had previously accepted that there are serious concerns about such use of the drug, would we feel comfortable enough to decline out Vet's request? (Perhaps the whole issue of "intimidation by authority" is cause for a new thread?)
Interesting...

I know when Zoey was recently put on Metacam, I had concerns after reading the warnings of members on this board (and other website, boards). However, when I called to discuss this with my vet, he assured me that:

- they have used metacam for several years, on thousands of cats
- it is approved for use in cats now (not sure if this is true or not in Canada - I can't find any recent documentation)
- he does not know of a vet in the area who does not use metacam
- he has never had any difficulty with the use of metacam in cats
- he uses a very small dose (Zoey is 3 lbs and on 1 drop daily) and most problems that he has heard of is caused by overdosing - people think if a little helps, then a lot will help even more
- the other doctor at the clinic will often prescribe 3x the dose that he does...but still has never run into any difficulties
- on the first sign that the cat isn't handling the drug well (is. vomiting, bloody diarrhea), he advises owners to immediatly stop treatment with the drug - many just wait it out
- every drug has risks

I can't say that I'm still not concerned (although the paranoia has weakened), but I felt that I really should trust his professional and clinical experience. Upon talking to him, I had to remember the thing about the internet - you can find a theory about anything, and 5 theories about everything. You read a couple dozen horror stories about cats who have reacted badly to the drug (or so is thought). You don't see the thousands of accounts about cats who used metacam and had no troubles at all - because using a drug that works is what is expected.

However, your "intimidation by authority" comment is interesting. I've been to the other vets in town. Their service, their treatment of myself and Zoey, and their expertise seems to pale in comparision to this vet. Did I succomb to fear of alienating the only vet that has tried to help us? Maybe a little. But, the thing is...when someone posts a medical concern on this board, posters may give some advice, but all advice is usually followed by a very strong direction to seek the advice of a vet. So, one gets the advice of the vet, brings it back to this board, and then is told to ignore the advice. It's a difficult place to be in. Those on the board have a lot of experience dealing with cats and illnesses. The information they can provide by sharing their experiences can be very valuable. But, in the end, they are not vets (maybe one or two are?).

Then again, not all vets are created equal. If I didn't recognize this, and hadn't done my own research, little Zoey...who is now walking around and meowing like crazy (for attention, not because she's in pain)...would have been put to sleep a week ago.

In the end, informed pet owners are in a real dilemma on who's opinion to trust the most.
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