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To deCLAW or leave the CLAWS

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
...That is the question. Ok ...not sure if this question should go in this forum. But, I have a declawing question for you guys. I have NEVER had a cat declawed before and have always assumed it would cause the cat discomfort or infection. I'm sure this is not always so because alot of ppl do get their (indoor) cats declawed.
Well, because of my mom at home she would love to have Myla on her bed but Myla being the little playfull thing she tends to claw. PLus, like most cats, furniture is a fun thing to scratch. LOL!
Myla is now about 8 months old...what are you opinions on getting her declawed?
Thanx! <3333
post #2 of 29
me personally, i don't agree with it. one reason being, as you stated "to cause discomfort to the cat".
post #3 of 29
post #4 of 29
I highly suggest you do a search for declawing, there are quite a few threads about it. Also, TCS is a very anti-declaw site

Rule 3. This website considers declawing a drastic way to curb cat behavior. A painful ordeal for your kitty we would suggest that declawing never be considered for any behavioral issue. Health issues are entirely different. It is up to you as a responsible pet owner to explore all the different options available instead of declawing. Your cat is dependant on you to make wise choices for her, and not put her into any more stress or discomfort. Please be a responsible pet owner and research this subject thoroughly. Understand that if you are pro-declaw in your posts, you will encounter opposition. Please learn more about alternatives for declawing here in our forums as well as on our website itself. Declaw - More than Just a Manicure. Hopefully those of you with claw-related problems will find solutions by spending time in our Behavior Forum.

and you will find that many members are very passionate about not declawing, myself included. I believe your initial feelings about declawing, ie, it causing pain and discomfort, are spot on.

*REMINDER* please keep this discussion civil
post #5 of 29
Hi

So the kitten claws the bed? She will probably outgrow this, this is kitten stuff, being all wild and crazy all the time.
A better route would be to put soft paws on her (cheaper too) and then she can't harm your things. Also, redirect her to things she can claw on, like cat trees and fun things to cats that you have bought her to play with like toys, posts, and cat stuff
And get her used to clipping her nails. I clip my cat with claws once a week. You can wrap them up in a towel armed with treats and clip away, taking care not to cut the quick. I keep mines nails so short she can't snag her nails on anything either. She is great about only clawing her own things. She never hurts humans or claws us ever.

I hear declawed kitties will have behavioral issues from declawing, not all, but with my luck mine would be the one if I ever decided to declaw. There goes going in the litterbox (ew!) and being a sweet kitty.

Plus, I live with dogs and I want my kitty (indoor only) to have her claws if she ever gets outside by a freak accident and needs to use them for any self defense reasons. Plus, it is just healthier. If you watch cats they do like to stretch with their claws and paws, it is natural for the cat, the way it is suppose to be. Have you seen what they actually do when they declaw a cat? It makes my heart sink.
I think there are lots of better, more humane, safer options than declaw. I think you do too, otherwise you wouldn't have been concerned and asked here
post #6 of 29
The easiest way to explain why declawing is inhumane is to look at your fingers. Cats claws are in essence located where our fingernails our - attached to the first joint. Declawing removes not just the claw but also the finger all the way to the first joint. This understandably is painful to walk on, especially for cats who walk on their toes to begin with.

The more humane thing to do would be to accustom her to getting her claws trimmed early on. Its a pretty easy thing to do - all you have to do is grab a little paw and put some pressure near the toes - claws should extend enough for you to just snip the end off with trimmers that you can buy at the pet store.

Much nicer to their little toes and yours too!
post #7 of 29
My cousin's cat Bosco was a ferral cat and didn't adjust well to being kept inside the vet recomended to them that they have him declawed. Which they did... I can't say I agree with their decision because Sibohan was a wild cat also and has ( with time) adjusted well to indoor living and trimming of claws.

I believe it is EXTREEMLY important to weigh all of the information. Cats can have severe problems after a declawing includeing but not limited to constant pain, psycological problems such as loss of bladder control etc. Thankfully that didn not happen with Bosco but he is not in the majority.

If you look on a lot of sites like "Craigslist" and the sort you will see many more declawed cats looking for new homes.... ever wonder why? possibly because of the outbursts they have had since their declawing!?

I later explained it to my cousin that declwing was like having your fingers amputated at the first nuckle... she was shocked. So I say Read the information provided on this site and others and think... if you were your cat's pet would you want it done to you?
post #8 of 29
I personally do not agree with declawing any cat, but if it is the differnce between a good home or no home that's differnt. I would think that 8 months is too old. I know vets will still do it, but the heavier they get the more painful. If the main situation is clawing when on the bed with your mother, why not invest in some soft paws? That should work to stop the issue without causing pain to the kitty.
post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
Wow...BIG THANX to each and every one of you guys for confirming my decision here.
MYLA WILL KEEP HER PRECIOUS LIL CLAWS!

I am really glad I had made a thread inquiring about the subject before I went ahead and doing it. I'm glad to hear I wasn't the only one who was pretty much against it. I luv my lil Myla and the last thing I would ever want is to cause her any type of discomfort. She alread went through that while she was at the shelter.

Thank you again!!
post #10 of 29
Very glad to hear it!
post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rang_27 View Post
I personally do not agree with declawing any cat, but if it is the differnce between a good home or no home that's differnt. I would think that 8 months is too old. I know vets will still do it, but the heavier they get the more painful. If the main situation is clawing when on the bed with your mother, why not invest in some soft paws? That should work to stop the issue without causing pain to the kitty.
"soft paws" ...interesting. Please explain.
post #12 of 29
Soft Paws are little plastic caps that go over the cats nails. You have to replace them about once a month, but they make it so the cat can't scratch anything. I'll post a link for their page. Also, it's not difficult to cut a cats nails. If you are unsure of how to do it, ask your vet or a groomer to show you. I cut my cats nails weekly and they are so dull they can't scratch anything.

http://www.softpaws.com/
post #13 of 29
I'm so glad you changed your mind. In fact I had never heard of declawing cats until I started researching how to hand raise a kitten. As far as I know its either illegal or never been done in Australia. And we don't have soft paws either. You'll have a much happier, healthier kitten.
post #14 of 29
NO NO NO. Many declawed cats suffer physical or emotional problems after a declaw. If not done right, you risk the deformed claw growing back and requireing another declaw surgery. Some cats don't walk right after and cannot climb or jump as well as before.

The emotional problems are far greater (IMO). They can start to bite more in self defense, hide out of fear or the worse one, decide not to use the litter pan cause it hurts their feet and instead choose your clothes, rugs, carpet, or bed to pee/poop.

Instead of resorting to an inhumane thing try:

1. Clipping the nails at least once a week - clip and check as needed.

2. Use Soft Paws nail caps.

3. Get a good treehouse (minimum of 4 feet tall) for the climbing and scratching exercise.

Declawing is like cutting off the 1st joint of your fingers - not just taking the fingernails off !
post #15 of 29
Very glad to hear you won't declaw her
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
NO NO NO. Many declawed cats suffer physical or emotional problems after a declaw. If not done right, you risk the deformed claw growing back and requireing another declaw surgery. Some cats don't walk right after and cannot climb or jump as well as before.

The emotional problems are far greater (IMO). They can start to bite more in self defense, hide out of fear or the worse one, decide not to use the litter pan cause it hurts their feet and instead choose your clothes, rugs, carpet, or bed to pee/poop.

Instead of resorting to an inhumane thing try:

1. Clipping the nails at least once a week - clip and check as needed.

2. Use Soft Paws nail caps.

3. Get a good treehouse (minimum of 4 feet tall) for the climbing and scratching exercise.

Declawing is like cutting off the 1st joint of your fingers - not just taking the fingernails off !

Again i'm so very glad I came to you guys for advice on the subject.

Now I do have a question on the nail clipping. Personally, i'd be afraid to do it myself for the fact of possible cutting her skin or harming her. Would it be best to take her to a groomer?
post #17 of 29
Its not hard to trim the claws yourself. Here is a great site that explains how, with pictures showing where to cute.

http://www.catscratching.com/htmls/article.htm
post #18 of 29
Bea thanks you for not declawing. Put her name in the search & take a peek at her threads.

As for nail clipping. Many vets will show you how to clip nails. What I did was have the vet show me the first time. The second time, I cut some of the nails myself with his assistance. From then on, I've been successful at doing it myself.
post #19 of 29
You can take her to a groomer or your vet and ask them to show you how to trim nails. Its not hard and once you establish a routine, they get used to it.

I start trimming nails on kittens at 3-4 weeks of age
post #20 of 29
At least on my cats, its pretty easy to see the quick, where the blood vessels and what not are. Its no problem to clip their claws, and I've never once nicked them. But that might depend on each cat, and especially how squiggly they are!
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oOoMissEoOo View Post
PLus, like most cats, furniture is a fun thing to scratch. LOL!
Regarding scratching furniture, we bought a product called Sticky Paws. It's similar to double sided tape and safe to use on furniture. It worked very well for our situation. Here's a link so you can check it out: http://www.stickypaws.com/
post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
WEll, I just took Myla to our vet to get those lil claws trimmed. She's doing great! Thank you guys again for the wonderful advice. And it only cost me $12. They told me they should be trimmed about every 3 weeks.
post #23 of 29
i am so so so glad that u decided not to declaw your kitty.


Quote:
Originally Posted by oOoMissEoOo \t\t\t\t\t \t\t\t\t
\t\t\t\tPLus, like most cats, furniture is a fun thing to scratch. LOL!
regarding to the furniture, i think you can put one/some scratching post/s near/around your piece of furniture. it would even be better if you can put some catnip/ catnip spray on the scratching post. for my babies , they choose scratching post but not my sofa in general. i personally think cats scratching sofas since they like the location ( since we are always there ). they probably prefer scratching post if it's near where the sofa is .

good luck!!! i hope you can find a to safe your sofa !!!!
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oOoMissEoOo View Post
Wow...BIG THANX to each and every one of you guys for confirming my decision here.
MYLA WILL KEEP HER PRECIOUS LIL CLAWS!

I am really glad I had made a thread inquiring about the subject before I went ahead and doing it. I'm glad to hear I wasn't the only one who was pretty much against it. I luv my lil Myla and the last thing I would ever want is to cause her any type of discomfort. She alread went through that while she was at the shelter.

Thank you again!!
fantastic news! you have certainly made the right decision for myla's health and happiness!
post #25 of 29
Even though the vet says "every 3 weeks" - cats nails grow fast and if you check them and clip as necessary once a week, they get used to clipping. By trying to do them every 3 weeks and not bothering to play with the feet or check things, you will run into more problems clipping those nails! Believe me!

My guys get checked weekly, but may not be clipped every week. They are used to it and would be ok to go longer - I just do it as a routine and don't have them make a fuss when its time.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sibohan2005 View Post

I believe it is EXTREEMLY important to weigh all of the information. Cats can have severe problems after a declawing includeing but not limited to constant pain, psycological problems such as loss of bladder control etc. Thankfully that didn not happen with Bosco but he is not in the majority.

If you look on a lot of sites like "Craigslist" and the sort you will see many more declawed cats looking for new homes.... ever wonder why? possibly because of the outbursts they have had since their declawing!?
So true. And you'll find a lot of declawed cats in shelters that have been abandoned as well. Usually because the cat turned into a biter, is aggressive or has litter box issues after being declawed.

I'm am very anti declaw. I feel it is unnecessary and cruel to cut down to the first knuckle on a cats toes just for the convenience of humans. Kittens will be kittens. You could try soft paws nail caps for kittens and nail clipping is a must. For cats there are soft paws, scratching posts and indoor cat trees along with nail clipping. Good luck convincing your mom! I hope it all works out!
post #27 of 29
I don't think I'd ever want to declaw. Though I haven't been placed in that situation before either.
post #28 of 29
The kitties are always great at the vet or groomer for us because they're so scared they just sit there. But at home when we first started to clip their claws, they would protest and squirm.

So the way we "trained" them to get their claws clipped by us was we did one claw at a time while they were asleep. We'd have the clippers ready (we just use regular large toe nail clippers), grab a paw, push down on one of the toes and the claw pops out and SNIP. Make sure you have treats ready and put two or three down. We just kept rotating and did one claw every day (or night). Within a couple of weeks (or months), they figure out clipping means treats and that you are not trying to kill them!

Laurie
post #29 of 29
When I first started trimming them, I was really conservative (barely taking the sharp point off) and checked them more often. Now that they are using their scratching posts, I tend to forget until I get scratched or poor Much is either clicking on the floor or gets hers caught in a blanket or something.
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