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Cat Peeing

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
My cat has done this on occasion with different items that he likes and I want to find a way to stop it from happening again.

Most recently, tonight, my cat was playing with the rug by the front door. He often rolls all over it for some odd reason but he does this every night and he just likes it. Tonight I saw him playing there and then he was sitting or almost sitting down. suddenly he jumped away and I glanced over and noticed a medium to large sized darker spot. I went over and sniffed and sure enough, he peed on it. He's done the exact same thing before with a few of my shoes, rolls all over the all the time and then one night/day decides to pee on them. This has also happened a few months ago with a rug that I had in the living room. How can I prevent him from doing this to objects that he likes? I can't afford to keep replacing things.

Also, would getting him neutered help? He's probably about 6 or 7 years old now so I'm not sure this would be beneficial. He's an indoor cat completely, has never gone outside so you'd think that "marking" his territory wouldn't be necessary. I thought that when cats wanted to mark something that they'd spray, not pee. I'm getting quite frustrated because this particular rug isn't even mine, it's my roommate's.
post #2 of 11
Well, maybe w/ the rugs and your shoes he's not rolling around b/c he likes them but b/c he smells other scents on them and is trying to put his own scent on top of it and thus pees on it...

I have a pee-problem cat (I hate to call her that, but it is really starting to be a huge problem) and someone recommended Comfort Zone diffuser w/ Feliway. It seems to work on her to an extent and I've heard that a lot of other ppl have had great success w/ it. You could always try that. It makes them calmer and they feel more at home. Maybe if he is smelling some other cat/animal, the Feliway would help....I'm not sure, that's quite a wierd problem though. GOOD LUCK!!
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by miao_kitty View Post
Well, maybe w/ the rugs and your shoes he's not rolling around b/c he likes them but b/c he smells other scents on them and is trying to put his own scent on top of it and thus pees on it...

I have a pee-problem cat (I hate to call her that, but it is really starting to be a huge problem) and someone recommended Comfort Zone diffuser w/ Feliway. It seems to work on her to an extent and I've heard that a lot of other ppl have had great success w/ it. You could always try that. It makes them calmer and they feel more at home. Maybe if he is smelling some other cat/animal, the Feliway would help....I'm not sure, that's quite a wierd problem though. GOOD LUCK!!
Before this you need to have him neutered! This is the major factor behind this kind of behavior.
post #4 of 11
Um yes definitely neuter him, it isn't just for behavior reasons, it is for his health too, do it before it is too late and he ends up with cancer. That is the first step here, I wouldn't even try anything else first.
post #5 of 11
Not to sound rude or anything, but all the emphasis put on spaying/neutering your cats kind've angers me. Two of my cats have not been fixed (one is, because we adopted her from a shelter), and we've actually never had a problem with urination or behavior from either of them. Surprisingly, it's the one who is spayed that causes the trouble. I don't think spaying/neutering is the first and definitely not the only solution to these problems... try the sprays, etc... they're cheaper and if they work, great. People say that spaying/neutering your cats can eliminate health problems such as cancer, etc... but that's like telling a man he needs to be castrated because he might someday have health problems. I don't think it's fair.
post #6 of 11
I can't believe you have a nonneutered cat indoors for 7 years!
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abstract View Post
Not to sound rude..... People say that spaying/neutering your cats can eliminate health problems such as cancer, etc... but that's like telling a man he needs to be castrated because he might someday have health problems. I don't think it's fair.
I think it might be unfair to either have your cat populate the neighborhood with unwanted kittens, or worse yet, allowing that they be intact with all their natural instincts, but not allowing them to act on it.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abstract View Post
Not to sound rude or anything, but all the emphasis put on spaying/neutering your cats kind've angers me. Two of my cats have not been fixed (one is, because we adopted her from a shelter), and we've actually never had a problem with urination or behavior from either of them. Surprisingly, it's the one who is spayed that causes the trouble. I don't think spaying/neutering is the first and definitely not the only solution to these problems... try the sprays, etc... they're cheaper and if they work, great. People say that spaying/neutering your cats can eliminate health problems such as cancer, etc... but that's like telling a man he needs to be castrated because he might someday have health problems. I don't think it's fair.
Are you serious? Have you visited any shelters lately that are just overflowing with cats and kittens because people leave them intact? There are so many other problems with leaving a cat intact then cancer. Females can get pyometra where the uterus walls builds up with fluid (more and more with every heat cycle) and becomes infected and the only way to fix this (if she doesn't die first) is to spay her. This is almost guaranteed to happen if a female is left intact forever and never reproduces.

Plus it is just mean to let them go on WANTING to reproduce but not letting them. That would drive a cat crazy. Better to speuter and have a healthy happy cat then to have one risking becoming ill and getting all antsy and crazy cooped up in a house not being able to reproduce when that is all that is on their minds. The world has way too many cats in it for this to happen.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abstract View Post
... but that's like telling a man he needs to be castrated because he might someday have health problems. I don't think it's fair.
They're not psychologically attached to their sexuality, like we are. So it doesn't bother them to be neutered.
post #10 of 11
I also wanted to agree with the above poster and add that fact. Comparing animals to humans is absurd. They do not think like we do, they do not have the ability to think about the consequences of what they are doing, reproduction is instinct, they cannot put any thought or emotion into it like people can. They will harm themselves to get to females in heat, to mate with every female they can regardless of consequences, regardless of whether or not they are healthy or carrying diseases. Males will harm each other to get to females in heat, etc. Animals and humans are incomparable.
post #11 of 11
Neutering can help, as long as the habit isn't terribly ingrained in them. Some cats will simply urinate to mark and not do the traditional spray marking. When you have him at the vet, have him checked out for a urinary tract infection (UTI) also. I had an odd case of a neutered 4 year old that started to pee in the empty dog food bowls. He first tested negative then later positive. He completely stopped the behavior when we cleared up his UTI.
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