or Connect
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › Which dog breeds are known to be good with cats
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Which dog breeds are known to be good with cats

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
Hello to everybody.

I have a two year and a half cat and I want to get a new dog.

I wish I could save a dog from a shelter but I decided that I will get it from a breeder.

Before I start looking for a breeder and a dog, I need to know what breed to look for.

I want a (1) medium to large size, (2) intelligent, (3) trainable, (4) dependable and (5) predictable dog that is of a breed known to be gentle and friendly to cats.

Suggestions? thank you !!
Ahem
post #2 of 41
Labrador - Keno adores cats. She's very good with them. Even raised a few litters of barn kittens. She's smart and well-trained.

If you go with labs, look for a breeder who breeds to the standard. Female labs should be 55-70 lbs when grown and males 60-85 when grown. There are too many lab breeders out there with labs OVER the standard!

Keno is maintained at 60-65 - perfect and proper size for a female.
post #3 of 41
Our shihtzu got a lot very well with out cats. And so did our great dane!
My best friends Sheltie gets a long pretty good with the cats, but she's a puppy and drives the cats crazy at times!

I know that a lot of our clients have dogs and cats and they get along great. I think almost any breed will get along with cats if you introduce them correctly and give everyone time to adjust. Also puppies are going to be very hyper for at least a year, so if you have a laid back cat, it might not enjoy having a hyper puppy running over it all the time.

Just curious why have you decided to go with a breeder instead of a shelter or rescue?
post #4 of 41
I do volunteer work with beagles and greyhounds and often foster dogs.I know several people with dogs and cats as well.I personally think ANY breed can get along well with a cat,as long as they are raised properly and given time to get used to eachother.
post #5 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by capt_jordi View Post
Our shihtzu got a lot very well with out cats. And so did our great dane!
My best friends Sheltie gets a long pretty good with the cats, but she's a puppy and drives the cats crazy at times!

I know that a lot of our clients have dogs and cats and they get along great. I think almost any breed will get along with cats if you introduce them correctly and give everyone time to adjust. Also puppies are going to be very hyper for at least a year, so if you have a laid back cat, it might not enjoy having a hyper puppy running over it all the time.

Just curious why have you decided to go with a breeder instead of a shelter or rescue?
Hi, thank you for your suggestion.
The cat is a persian so he is quite laid back. He is only two years and a half but he and I went through quite hard times already. It is only recently, really, that he is feeling better and is enjoying a more care free lifestyle. He is a very intelligent cat and a stunningly good cat - the good cat that does as you ask (like a dog that is well trained). I want a dog to get him company, to enlarge his mind, to mend to his curiosity and to see him less bored and really, to get him a friend. I would do ok witout a dog, but I don't want to create a problem - I don't want to stress him at all or expose him to the unknown and unnecessary risks (healthwise and behavioral) that I think would come with a dog from a shelter. Returning a dog to the shelter (or breeder) could never be an option, so I right now am trying to choose in a rational way that will be best for everybody. I hope this makes sense.
post #6 of 41
Actually, my dog came from a shelter.
Most shelters do temperment testing with dogs in a variety of situations before placing them for adoption simply to ensure a match is absolutely perfect.

He's 8 years old now and I have never had a problem with him around cats, dogs, infants, toddlers, adults or the elderly as he'd been tested in all those situations.
post #7 of 41
You also might look into specific breed rescues. They would have older settled dogs that would be tested regarding cats. And puppies are a lot more active then an adult dog. If you want a well-trained dog, its better to adopt an older one who's had training.

We got Keno at 14 months old - she was already well-trained. Pups are cute, but personally I'd adopt an older well-trained dog
post #8 of 41
I only want to point it out b/c you said you wish you could rescue a dog instead.

Most shelters extensively temperment test the animals to ensure their compatibility and safety with cats, or if they can't be placed with them. In addition to shelters, there are rescue organizations, in which case more often then not the dog is living in a foster home, and probably has for a while. The organization and foster families know these dogs inside and out. These organizations WANT these dogs to have forever homes, they do know what they are doing and they do it for the welfare of all the animals.

If you want a puppy and to go through the "puppy phase", there are often times puppies available through both avenues, shelters and rescue organizations.

Just an FYI in looking for a breeder, depending what breed you chose, you'll have to work to find a reputable breeder. There are many many many more irresponsible breeders out there then reputable ones. You'll want to look for a breeder that health tests and competes with their dogs (reason why you want a breeder that competes, to be reputable they will only selectively breed and to do so, they need to compete to determine what is breeding quality) Most repuatable breeders have waiting lists to get on b/c they won't breed more then one to two litters per year, depending on how many dogs they have, and generally the puppies are spoken for before birth. More then two though is a red flag more often then not. A reputable breeder breeds to better the breed. You'll want to see OFA records to ensure the proper health testing has been done to ensure your companion will be a healthy and hopefully problem-free one throughout it's life.

All breeds have "breed clubs" or parent clubs, this is not AKC, that is simply a registry. For example, if you chose to go with a lab then - http://www.thelabradorclub.com/ in which case you can look up breeders listed in your local area -- http://www.thelabradorclub.com/breeders/

You will still have to do your homework and evaluate the breeder, just b/c it is listed on the parent club does not make them reputable, but it is a start.

You'll also want to do some research on what breed of dog you chose. I wouldn't just pick a breed based on compatibility with cats. You are stuck with this animal for even up to 12-15 years if you are lucky. But for example, a border collie is an active dog that needs a job and won't be happy just laying at your feet. Many are turned into rescue, along with labs, b/c they are so popular but people don't really know what they are getting into. I have an aussie that was abandoned at the pound b/c he was too hyper. He's great with me, he just wasn't given an outlet for his energy in his former home.

I do believe any dog raised as such, will be fine with your cats.

So just a few things to consider to get you started on the right track!
post #9 of 41
I'd suggest getting an adult shelter dog, too. Look for a shelter that has the facilities to visit extensively with the dog away from the pandemonium of the general shelter, and make sure to test the dog's response around children and adults of both sexes, as well as around cats. If you can take the time for a couple of long visits to spend some time with the dog first prior to adopting it, you'll reduce the chance of having to return it.

Our dog came to us as a young adult from a shelter - we specifically chose one with a very gentle temperament who was inquisitive & friendly to cats, but respectful of them if they didn't want to interact. She's a 'Heinz-57' dog, probably Lab/German Shepherd/Border Collie, and has done beautifully with our older cats, and even acted as a sort of 'foster mom' to a foster kitten we had for a while. She was about a year old when we adopted her, and we've had her for 5 years now, and have never had any trouble with her with the cats. She loves the one that is friendly to her, and leaves the ones who don't wish to be bothered alone. In adopting an adult dog, you can be sure of what kind of dog you'll end up with, while getting a puppy can be a bit of a chance.
post #10 of 41
Thread Starter 
I just wanted to thank to all of you who offered suggestions and advice. Shelter or breeder, I realize I have to do a lot of research. I will take on the suggestion to talk with somebody from a shelter, or rather - I will not dismiss the shelter idea, before I talk with them. I have experience with the selection process overall, none with the shelters though, and none with dogs. In either case, I prefer a puppy.

There isn`t much info out there though about dogs and cats together (apart that they get along well with proper introduction).

What I am not really sure is whether a dog is the best idea for my cat.

Will the cat be happier? (the dog will be since he will go out, play, do the dog things, etc). For the cat, will it really be that the addition of the dog will make him less bored? will he find interest in the habits and personality of the dog? will they communicate on a level more appropiate and more fun, for the cat? will it be exciting for the cat, in a good way? will they play? will he have companionship closer to his level of understanding? will the dog improve his life?

Lol, these are the questions ..
post #11 of 41
I have a boxer and she loves all my cats. None of my cats mind her but only 1 cat will actually play with the dog (and thats Veeshan, the ruddy Somali). I did have a Persian (died last year from heart failure). My Persian never played with the dog but didn't mind the dog either. My Persian loved other cats, he got along with all my cats.
post #12 of 41
Perhaps this article might help? Cats & Dogs:
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Con...=1&SourceID=47
post #13 of 41
I see people adopt dogs or cats as companions for the other species....and rarely do they actually become friends.

I reccomend a lab.
post #14 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post

Will the cat be happier? (the dog will be since he will go out, play, do the dog things, etc). For the cat, will it really be that the addition of the dog will make him less bored? will he find interest in the habits and personality of the dog? will they communicate on a level more appropiate and more fun, for the cat? will it be exciting for the cat, in a good way? will they play? will he have companionship closer to his level of understanding? will the dog improve his life?

.

There is really no way to answer this. It is such a case by case type of situation. Where some cats actually love and play with the dog/dogs they live with, some barely tolerate them. I'd venture to say most just co-exist.

Of my own 6 cats, 5 co-exist with the dogs. They have no problem being in the same room, and will happily try to bully my doberman aside to get to a morsel of food But have no interest at all with interacting with the dogs.

One of the 6, Keli, loves my aussie, Harley, but just co-exists with the other dogs. She sleeps cuddled up to him, and constant purrs and rubs on him. No clue why she has chosen him? LOL, she likes Harley more then me She didn't grow up with him, she was already 4 years old when we adopted Harley. And she wasn't an only cat, so it's not like it was just the two of them and they bonded.

So while I'm sure you would be able to introduce a dog into your home, there is no way of knowing whether your cat would actually become bonded and interact with it, or merely live with it. I'd venture to guess if you bring a puppy in the house, chances are the cat would be rather disgusted with the activity level of a puppy and would be more likely to bond with a quieter adult.

Good luck
post #15 of 41
Thread Starter 
More background: I arrived to the idea of a dog because my cat (1) looks unhappy - or rather bored and (2) does not do the `cat` things that would make me think is content with cat life and (3) I want to give him a good life

Now details
re (1): he is young and should be banging with energy and he is not and has never been; medical reasons have been ruled out by many doctors; he is courious but gets bored with everything very fast so i can`t provide unlimited new things for him; he is more interested in people than toys, more interested in other animals than in people; he is not neutered so this is not hormonal; he has no restrictions in the house (other than window guards and front door)
re (2): he is not `stuck` to me, maybe he is just the independant type; he is not sleeping in the bed, not in my lap; but he trusts me and comes for belly rubs to me and sits on his back on my desk and purrs so I am content though he does not look so. Maybe somebody else (a dog) will fulfil his emotional needs more/ better? he seems happy when he watches other animals, birds and when his curiosity is satisfied.

I don`t want to force cat happiness onto him, but shouldn`t he be having more things going? I hope a dog will engage him and excite him and even upset him a bit. I would not mind if he created some mayhem if he looked happier.

I should have kids like this, not cats like this.

Anyway .. is a dog a good solution?
post #16 of 41
He *may* be better of with another cat honestly now that you've given a little more of your concerns with him. The chances of him bonding with another cat and playing (ie getting more active) are much much greater then with a dog.

It still is a type of situation where there is no way to tell until you are in it, but with him being an independent type, I just don't see him getting active with a dog or especially a pup.

With him not being neutered, there is always the concern of getting territorial and spraying with the introduction of another animal. Not a hard and fast rule, just wanted to give you a little FYI b/c it can happen. Any particular reason to keep him unneutered? Health benefits to neutering are vast.
post #17 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelicat View Post
He *may* be better of with another cat honestly now that you've given a little more of your concerns with him. The chances of him bonding with another cat and playing (ie getting more active) are much much greater then with a dog.

It still is a type of situation where there is no way to tell until you are in it, but with him being an independent type, I just don't see him getting active with a dog or especially a pup.

With him not being neutered, there is always the concern of getting territorial and spraying with the introduction of another animal. Not a hard and fast rule, just wanted to give you a little FYI b/c it can happen. Any particular reason to keep him unneutered? Health benefits to neutering are vast.
Hi. Interesting what you say, that he might be bored even with a dog. I fear that.
He is not neutered because when he was 10 months he was in the hostpital with a severe infection, and any unecessary operation was out of the question in the months after he recovered. It took him another year anyway to regain is pre-hospital weight. Actually he was happiest when he came from the hospital, and as he recovered he became more bored. Anyway, the tests and xrays show now that he is ok or at least he does not have a detectable clinical condition nor was the infection with lasting consequences. Since he is not spraying and not going outside, neutering is no necessity for now. When this will change, it will become an issue of consideration. In any case pure breeds mature sexually much later, so I am not concerned that he is not spraying the walls yet. I would not risk to harm him if there was no clear benefit. I thought is relevant to mention that he is not neutered so as not to associate his boredom with the post-neutering decrease of activity which would be otherwise expected.
I dislike the idea of getting another cat because that increases even if marginally his health risks, would likely make him spray and he`ll likely loose his balls and I think it would bring him competion rather than excitement. Also considering space and a need for felxibility, I could probably handle the addition of a smart dog on a leash much easier than of another cat in a carrier.
I thought about this quite a lot .. it seems it comes to adding a dog or getting a cat shrink or adding nothing but a shrink for me.
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post
I thought about this quite a lot .. it seems it comes to adding a dog or getting a cat shrink or adding nothing but a shrink for me.

Nice I think we've all felt this way a time or two! Good luck in however you go :-) Keep us updated.
post #19 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelicat View Post
I'd venture to guess if you bring a puppy in the house, chances are the cat would be rather disgusted with the activity level of a puppy
This is pretty much how all the adult cats I've had (with dogs) viewed puppies.

ahem, unless I misread (I scanned through so it's possible), you have a persian? Unless I'm mistaken, I thought persians where supposed to be laid back and quiet cats? Maybe your cat is just extra kicked back? I have a cat that is quite happy laying around doing nothing all day.

What the others have suggested is true, if the dog has been around cats and knows how to behave itself there won't be a problem on that end. A puppy that has never been around cats may be extra excited over this "new creature" and bark/generally annoy your cat. But the question is, has your cat ever been around dogs?
Mine have only seen dogs from a distance and based on their reactions (furious growling) I would never let a puppy near them - they could quite possibly seriously injure or kill a puppy even if it were a few months old. Bites and scratches can get infected in just a few hours.

People often forget that cats can and will defend themselves, and can be a threat in their own. You have a responsibility to care for and protect any animal you bring into your home, not just your cat.

Breed wise, I grew up with pits and pit mixes. My mother would call the cats "babies" and tell them to be gentle... this resulted in cats having to endure many baths curtsy of a "motherly" dog - no matter if the dog was male. I wish I had pictures of the poor slobber covered cats.
post #20 of 41
My friends adopted a ~4 month old puppy from the city pound a few years ago. The cats who already lived there didn't really care for him, but then they don't like my dog either (I visit with her) and my dog is very gentle and calm... Anyway, they got another cat later who was an adult when he literally showed up at their door, and that cat LOVED the (now teenaged) puppy. The two would play like crazy, the cat would pounce on the dog's face, the dog would mouth the cat's head and they just had a lot of fun pouncing and wrestling and playing.
post #21 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelicat View Post
Nice I think we've all felt this way a time or two! Good luck in however you go :-) Keep us updated.
Now what YOU say is funny.
post #22 of 41

i thought that pug dogs where most nice to cats but i was wrong thank you for leting me know.

post #23 of 41

LABS,. LABS AND LABS........

post #24 of 41

Well, I recommend testing the cat. My cat came to us so not sure. We already had a lab and a Yorkie. They mixed just fine. They sleep together, play together and are just fine. But it also depends on the temperament of all animals involved. I recommend letting them visit. Not every cat will like dogs or other cats and the same goes for dogs. My cat doesn't like my sister in laws Yorkie, but tolerates it just fine.

post #25 of 41

I know this is an old thread, but I had to put in my two cents worth in case any one is asking themselves this question four years later:

I really depends upon the dog + cat.  Trysh and I have been trying to socialize a feral cat for almost a year.  We moved Mystique into Trysh's Cattery with the goal of socializing her enough to be able to adopt her out into a Forever Home.  She is still quite skittish; we'd not been able to pet her.  (The other four cats we moved into her cattery over this past year have been adopted out.)

One day last week Trysh decided to let Mystique and "Dougal" see each other.  Mystique absolutely fell in love with Dougal, head butting him, laying next to him, weaving in between his legs, playing.  For the first time, Trysh was able to pet Mystique when Mystique was engaged with Dougal.  For the first time, Mystique laid down with a "soft eyes" expression.  This morning when I played with Mystique, she seemed calmer, more at ease.

Dougal is a tall, pure-bred Vizsla, less than a year old, well behaved, not neutered (she is showing the dog).  Mystique will fit underneath Dougal's legs when he is standing. Size doesn't necessarily matter.

I'd go with an slightly older shelter dog; their personalities are more known to the volunteers.

post #26 of 41

Please do not get your pets from a breeder.  Adopt from a shelter.  Most dogs and cats are neutered or spayed, housed trained, and vaccinated.  Put breeders out of business!  Their animals wind out in shelters anyway.  So why give them the business?  Do you research as to what type of breed are cat-friendly and TAKE YOUR TIME.  I have three cats:  two seniors and a one year old.  I was thinking about committing myself to a dog, too.  I'm looking at shelters and foster sites.  Petfinder.com appears to be a great choice to conduct your search and it is loaded with information that will help you make the right choice.  Please do not give breeders any more business.  They are the reason our local shelters and Animal Control are congested with unwanted pets.  These poor creatures are being euthanized for no fault of their own.  They didn't ask to be bred.

post #27 of 41

I have three cats and most of the time, all they do is sleep.  :) 
 

post #28 of 41

Question:   did you train your Boxer to like your cats?  I'm thinking about adopting a medium size dog.  I realize there may be some time taken into Introducing the dog to the cats (I have three - 2 are seniors (9 yr olds) and 1 - one yr old).

post #29 of 41

i was wondering if you could help me find a good dog that will be good with my two cats and is a good watch dog

 

we just had an breakin and my moms a bit scared now but we will not give up our cats 

one of my cats actually stayed scared 

post #30 of 41

Of course you can't judge a dog solely on the breed it would be good if you could find a dog that has been around cats to know for sure.  I don't know how big you want to go with a dog but mastiff type dogs usually do well with cats and tend to be laid back and easy going with the family.  They usually aren't known for being attack type dogs but they are watchful and will do what is necessary to protect. Their size is enough to intimidate.  The one drawback is that they have the loose jowls on their mouth which means they are droolers.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cats and Other Animals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › Which dog breeds are known to be good with cats