TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › lovebirds/ single or a pair?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

lovebirds/ single or a pair?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
hello all, I am considering getting a lovebird. I have read conflicting things about keeping one bird only.
the one I am looking at is a baby and hasn't mated yet. I understand they mate for life.
most of the sites on parrot (lovebirds are a small parrot) keeping say that it is NOT necessary to have a pair.
That one bird will bond with YOU the human.

others say you have to have two.

does anybody know?

Thanks in advance, need advise asap
post #2 of 11
It is not neccesary to have two lovebirds.
In fact, while I was doing parrot rescue, I noticed that the majority of the LBs I rescued were happier to have a cage to themselves and the affection of a human.

Really, with parrots, unless you plan to breed or never interact with them, they do fine as single birds and most prefer it.


What species of LB are you considering?
post #3 of 11
Depends on how much time you will have to spend with your bird(s).

If you won't have much time, it's good to get two, so they have company, but get birds of the same sex, if you don't want babies. However, if you get two at the same time, they may be harder to tame, if you want to hand-tame them, unless you start them out in separate cages.

If you just get one, you'll need quite a few toys to occupy it's time while you're gone, then take it out and handle it, if you want it to grow up loving you and trusting you. =) And yes, a single bird will bond to YOU, whereas a pair will bond to EACH OTHER.
post #4 of 11
Whilst I agree with some of this, it's still very very possible to have 2 lovebirds that both bond to you as WELL as each other. They mainly bond to eachother but that doesn't mean that they can't be handtamed, if you're willing to put the effort in.

If you aren't going to take the bird out each day (if you get a single bird) and play with it for at least an hour or two (IMO) you should get two birds. It's not fair on a bird that needs to be bonded with someone to just leave it alone...
post #5 of 11
In my opinion, I think you should get two. They do mate for life, and they get used to each others attention, as well as yours.

I don't see any harm in it at all...it's worth a try!
post #6 of 11
There is no need to have a pair unless you can't dedicate the time to keeping a single one happy. Hand reared parrots of most species do not tend to take well to sharing with another bird, as they want to bond with a human. If you can provide that close bond, then that's great. If not, get 2 that are already paired - birds can be very very particular about who they will bond with (it is for life after all, not a decision to be taken lightly), and you can't make them like each other by putting them in the same cage, you don't want fighting.

Be warned that female lovebirds can be prone to overlaying!
post #7 of 11
Hi, I've never had a lovebird before but they are very cute little parrots. A bit fiesty and "high-pitched" for my tastes. Have you spent any time interacting with any before or been around them? Here is a good site with alot of general lovebird information.

http://www.africanlovebirdsociety.com/

http://tailfeathersnetwork.com/

The most commonly kept as pets I belive are the Peach-Faced, but Fischers and Black Masked are also available. There are other rarer species than those three.

Whether or not to get a pair is a decision that really depends on what you are hoping for. I think it is true that lovebird bond more closely to eachother than budgies, for example. So if you really want a tame pet it may be advisable to start off with one and form a bond with it before adding another. I know of people that have more than one that do not keep them in the same cage. Whether you are interested in getting a handfed (by humans) or parent-reared lovebird may also play a role in your decision. If you only have one you will need to be dedicated to giving it companionship and keeping its mind busy. I believe they can live as long as 25 years so take your time researching.
post #8 of 11
Unless you want to breed later, I would just get one. Single birds do fine as long as they have enough attention.

If you want another to keep the first happy, I would get 2, but ask that they both be DNA sexed so you can get 2 of the same gender: (I would get 2 males just so you don't have to worry about eggs and laying issues), that way you don't have to worry about mating and ending up with babies when you are not ready for all that comes with it.

Whatever you end up getting make sure its a tame bird that has either been hand raised or hand tamed. I would get one from a breeder and stay away from pet stores (pet store birds usually arn't tame or there is a risk of them being sick). Good luck!

http://www.tailfeathersnetwork.com/community/ is a good bird forum.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylacat View Post
that way you don't have to worry about mating and ending up with babies when you are not ready for all that comes with it.
I don't wish to offend anyone, but even if you get a male and female and they produce fertilised eggs, it is very very easy to make sure they don't hatch. You may have to be prepared and able to do this if getting a male and female, but it's really not complicated.
post #10 of 11
Not everyone believes in that...just like not everyone believes in abortion. And actually I meant babies...not eggs. Its just easier not to have to deal with egg laying issues in the first place.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaylacat View Post
Not everyone believes in that...just like not everyone believes in abortion. And actually I meant babies...not eggs. Its just easier not to have to deal with egg laying issues in the first place.
^ Agrees. =<

Not to mention, I wouldn't want to risk getting a female eggbound...=x
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cats and Other Animals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › Cats and Other Animals › lovebirds/ single or a pair?