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How to deal with a 7yr old that acts 16

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I was wondering if anyone had a 7 yr old that acted like they were already a teen? How do you deal with the every day drama?
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bush7105 View Post
I was wondering if anyone had a 7 yr old that acted like they were already a teen? How do you deal with the every day drama?
Do you play with him? Does he respond to the old feather on the stick or a laser light? Try to play with him every day, he will probably respond in some fashion and act like a younger cat.
post #3 of 26
Do you mean he's acting like a SENIOR cat?

I have an 11 month old - HE acts like a "teenager." Won't listen, gets into everything, uses the phone at all hours, invites his friends over - ok, I'm kidding about the last two, but adolescent behavior happens in cats under the age of 2-3.

What are you referring to when you say he's acting like a teen?
post #4 of 26
I'm guessing this is a human she's on about?
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosiemac View Post
I'm guessing this is a human she's on about?
I think so too
post #6 of 26
Er guys... I think the OP might be talking about a human child rather than a furry one?

Not that I can help with that but it makes the 'play with a feather on a stick' suggestion rather amusing, sorry
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosiemac View Post
I'm guessing this is a human she's on about?



A human? Oh boy did I read that wrong, then!

In that case, I would request a neuropsych eval through the school and get the kid some counseling - he may be acting out because he doesn't have the proper emotional tools to process what he's feeling inside.

I had to do this when my daughter started to act out as a youngster, got her into play therapy which really helped.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
Er guys... I think the OP might be talking about a human child rather than a furry one?

Not that I can help with that but it makes the 'play with a feather on a stick' suggestion rather amusing, sorry


I guess we get carried away with kitty thinking, but I assumed a skin-child too

What kind of behaviour? The moodiness? the slamming doors? the answering back? (OMG these are cat behaviour too )
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingersMom View Post
A human? Oh boy did I read that wrong, then!
Were not used to talking about the skinned variety are we
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
Er guys... I think the OP might be talking about a human child rather than a furry one?

Not that I can help with that but it makes the 'play with a feather on a stick' suggestion rather amusing, sorry
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
But I like the feather stick idea maybe I should try it He is just being a brat I am not sure if it is because he gets up at 6 am for the bus he goes to bed at eight if I sent him to bed earlier I do not believe it would be fair to him. He is just mouthy and he has a bad temper. He also is still throwing tantrums and it gets hard at times. (only so much one person can take ). I guess i should have let you know I was talking about my son not my cat huh (brain fart) sorry
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bush7105 View Post
He is just mouthy and he has a bad temper. He also is still throwing tantrums and it gets hard at times.
Nanny 911!!
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosiemac View Post
Nanny 911!!
Daddy 911 works (now I feel sorry for what I did to my mom growing up)
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bush7105 View Post
But I like the feather stick idea maybe I should try it He is just being a brat I am not sure if it is because he gets up at 6 am for the bus he goes to bed at eight if I sent him to bed earlier I do not believe it would be fair to him. He is just mouthy and he has a bad temper. He also is still throwing tantrums and it gets hard at times. (only so much one person can take ). I guess i should have let you know I was talking about my son not my cat huh (brain fart) sorry
Have you had him allergy tested? It could be something in his diet.
post #15 of 26
Drop food colorings, high fructose corn syrup and possibly milk from his diet. All those things set off my child.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by pee-cleaner View Post
Drop food colorings, high fructose corn syrup and possibly milk from his diet. All those things set off my child.
That's something I've noticed in kids (around them all the time, although I don't have one). The hyper/smart-alecky kids are usually the ones who are drinking sodas and winning over parents and grandparents to get candy. Not saying the OP is doing this... but something i've noticed.

Cut out soda/pop, only allow no/low sugar juices and water. This also means no Koolaid. I grew up on the stuff, but i also played outside constantly and was relatively active. I had an outlet for the hyperactivity. He may not have any outlets for his frustration. if he isn't already, get him involved in activities he wants to do (not that YOU want him to do)... for example: karate, swim classes, etc... if he likes the action of video games, then some form of martial arts may help burn some of that energy, give him some focus.

At this age, he's learning to find his identity, it's that in-between age... he's not a little kid (like pre-K) but he's not a teenager. You are not the only one he listens to anymore, he has school friends. His social circle is much larger now. Help him find some focus in his life, if he doesn't already... But don't over do it, either... Too many activities can make things just as bad... one or two is good... but let him have time to still be a kid.

Of course, maybe he just wants your attention... go to the park and play with him... not just watch him play...

Here i go writing a darn book again... I really should try to stop talking so darn much...

I'm not just pulling things out of thin air... watching SuperNanny gives me some of this... also knowing lots of people with kids of varying ages (best friend has two teenage daughters-watched them grow up)... I'll shut up now... I have no idea what you already do with him, so I'm just throwing things out there...

A.
post #17 of 26
Oh my, I understand about the drama; I thought girls were worse than boys. You should see some of my daughter's 9 and 10 year-old friends.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pee-cleaner View Post
Drop food colorings, high fructose corn syrup and possibly milk from his diet. All those things set off my child.
That's always an excellent idea! Definitely get rid of artificial colors, artificial sweeteners, and artificial flavors. It's proven that they contribute to ADHD or ADHD-like behavior. Plus, they are poisons that nobody should be eating.

And high-fructose corn syrup is a fast slide to diabetes, and it's in tons of processed foods, even those that aren't supposed to be sweet. Check the labels.
post #18 of 26
One other sugestion: Talk to your pediatrician about your son's behavior - keep the doc in the loop - they may be able to assist you as well.
post #19 of 26
tie him to a bicycle and make him run a couple times around the block :P

but seriously...tucker him out, he'll be too tired to fight.
post #20 of 26
My oldest daughter used to have horrible tantrums, through the process of elimination, and help with a peditrician, we found out it was yellow food dye #5 also called tartrazine. It is very common for it to cause behaviour problems, it is also known to cause cancer, it is in an amazing amount of foods, taking it out of her diet almost eliminated her tantrums. of course now she is 17 and everything is a drama
post #21 of 26
I'd like to add that his behavior might be completely age-appropriate (you didn't go into details).

Say things to him to give him something to live up to, if you don't do this already. Something like, "You're such a nice kid, I want everyone to know the real you," or "I'm so surprised to see you doing/saying that," or "I'm sure you didn't realize it, but that hurt my feelings." Or whatever, start with the positive.

Don't say, "What's wrong with you?" I've done that a few times and it doesn't help things at all!

And, good luck!
post #22 of 26
I would agree with the advice to get him evaluated physically. Also, was he a problem child when littler than this? Is there a change in behavior? Is he just spoiled? (Sorry, had to ask b/c giving in when kids are very small only lead to big problems as they age.)

He made need an emotional eval also, but start with the pede.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bush7105 View Post
I was wondering if anyone had a 7 yr old that acted like they were already a teen? How do you deal with the every day drama?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bush7105 View Post
But I like the feather stick idea maybe I should try it He is just being a brat I am not sure if it is because he gets up at 6 am for the bus he goes to bed at eight if I sent him to bed earlier I do not believe it would be fair to him. He is just mouthy and he has a bad temper. He also is still throwing tantrums and it gets hard at times. (only so much one person can take ). I guess i should have let you know I was talking about my son not my cat huh (brain fart) sorry
Well, I guess you can't say "I'm gonna call your Uncle Jamie!!"
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thank You all for the advice
post #25 of 26
how are things for him at school? I know that my grandson puts up with teasing & other misbehaviors from the kids who have their own problems at home (dads in prison for gang-related killings; in foster care, etc) not to mention the drama-queen girls who love to torment the boys knowing that the boys can't really retaliate When my grandson was in 2nd grade, I was a volunteer & some of those girls were MASTER MANIPULATORS - they were so sneaky at provoking the boys, and invariably the boys would get the blame for reacting
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme View Post
how are things for him at school? I know that my grandson puts up with teasing & other misbehaviors from the kids who have their own problems at home (dads in prison for gang-related killings; in foster care, etc) not to mention the drama-queen girls who love to torment the boys knowing that the boys can't really retaliate When my grandson was in 2nd grade, I was a volunteer & some of those girls were MASTER MANIPULATORS - they were so sneaky at provoking the boys, and invariably the boys would get the blame for reacting
Exactly what I was going to say!! You should talk with his teacher. My daughter started the same thing at the same age and after having a talk with her teacher, I realized what was going on! She had an overbearing teacher and a few cruel kids in her class. And when I say overbearing, I really mean cruel. One of those teachers that would jerk them out of line by their arms and sling them around and belittle them in front of the rest of the class. I saw it first hand.
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