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Why do you brown a roast?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am interested in everyone's opinions on this matter. My hubby likes it when I cook a roast in the crockpot. I have tried browning it first, and I have tried not browning it first. Why do the recipies call for browning? I didn't really notice much difference when it wasn't browned. What do you do?
post #2 of 18
my husband is the roast cook in our house and he always browns it. I think (and could totally be wrong) that browning it helps hold in the juice and flavor.
post #3 of 18
I didn't know you were supposed to brown it first I always just stick it in the crock pot
post #4 of 18
Browning is really more for cooking a roast in the oven. mom2raven is right, though, browning is used to help seal in the juices and flavor of a meant when it is going to be cooked in a manner that may cause it to become dry. It can also be used to add flavor to a meat.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
I didn't know you were supposed to brown it first I always just stick it in the crock pot
I didn't know there was another way
post #6 of 18
You sear in the juices first. Makes for a more tender & juicy roast.
post #7 of 18
Ooh ooh ooh, I know the answer. I researched this a couple years ago when I was trying to get my roast to taste like the one's my mom used to make.

Browning the roast used to lock in the roast's flavor. But, over the last few years, our health conscious society has caused a change in the beef industry, where changes have been made in feed, pasture and processing of beef where it has less that 1/4 of the fat content that it used to have.

With the decreased fat content, searing no longer works. So, you won't notice much of a difference.

The browned fat also made any potatoes cooked with the roast a nice, deep golden brown, but that doesn't work very well anymore either
post #8 of 18
Browning seals in the juices and also adds some colour and flavour to the meat.
post #9 of 18
browning makes it more tender and holds juices in better but also helps produce a gravy from the juices mixed with the flour you browned it with.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by badninjakitties View Post
Browning is really more for cooking a roast in the oven. mom2raven is right, though, browning is used to help seal in the juices and flavor of a meant when it is going to be cooked in a manner that may cause it to become dry. It can also be used to add flavor to a meat.
It tastes so good.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippymjp View Post
Ooh ooh ooh, I know the answer. I researched this a couple years ago when I was trying to get my roast to taste like the one's my mom used to make.

Browning the roast used to lock in the roast's flavor. But, over the last few years, our health conscious society has caused a change in the beef industry, where changes have been made in feed, pasture and processing of beef where it has less that 1/4 of the fat content that it used to have.

With the decreased fat content, searing no longer works. So, you won't notice much of a difference.

The browned fat also made any potatoes cooked with the roast a nice, deep golden brown, but that doesn't work very well anymore either
This has been my experience also, with browning roasts.
post #12 of 18
I always brown my roast. I find that it gives better flavor to the gravy when it's made from the cracklings.
post #13 of 18
I like browning because I make a gravy or au jus or wine sauce from the stuff that left in the pan after browning.
post #14 of 18
I also brown mine, but I do not cook in the crockpot...I sold the thing since I never used it! I can't seem to cook without wanting to stir something! .... anyways, it is to seal in the juices.
I brown it, cook it in a bullion type broth with onion, after it's cooked for about 3-4 hrs or so, I make a brown gravy to add to it and add some canned whole tomatoes and cook another hour probably. The tomatoes really add a great flavor. My mom used to cook it pretty much dry with carrots and potatoes around it, but I prefer my veggies as sides cooked seperately.
post #15 of 18
Am I allowed to disagree??? I always have the opposite result when browning a roast, It always gets dry and tough! I always find that if I let it cook without browning it first it is falling apart tender!!
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by glitch View Post
Am I allowed to disagree??? I always have the opposite result when browning a roast, It always gets dry and tough! I always find that if I let it cook without browning it first it is falling apart tender!!
I haven't tried it without browning for a long time....now you've got me wondering and I'm gonna have to try it next time!
post #17 of 18
RaggieKitty~ Yup, mine always turn out better when I dont brown them! Dont know why, but they do!! If it gets tough no one will eat it and it goes to waste!
post #18 of 18
I want to know what the heck is browning a roast?????? I know searing before you cook it, but browning? I always sear my roasts, stews, especially before the crock pot.
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