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Feeding Strays and TNR - Page 2

post #31 of 51
This is actually the first time that I have ever heard someone say it would be cruel to feed them without getting them fixed. I don't agree with that because I don't agree with letting any living creature starve....but I can see where you are coming from with it.

Do I try to practice TNR? Yes. Do I get every single stray cat that comes around fixed. No. It just isn't possible because by the time you have finally gotten off the waiting list to have help with getting them fixed..some are gone.

I have gotten 1 feral female fixed and 1 stray female fixed (2 counting Molly..but we ended up falling in love with her during her healing process), we were supposed to get 3 more fixed that time but they weren't around when it came to the time we could get them in. I have also sadly had to have 2 male strays put to sleep. Right now, we are going to try to get the new stray female that adopted us spayed and get the 3 stray males fixed also. Pease send vibes that 2 of them will be around when the time comes...I know Pumkin (semi feral) will be.
post #32 of 51
It isn't possible to get everyone, the difference is you try to get them speutered. But when people feed animals, they mark that it is a safe place for shelter and food and then you can end up with a lot of ferals. The more you get in one yard, the closer the contact is between groups and the more little feral kittens you have running around.

As for comparing animals to humans, I don't feel that it is the same thing at all. People make the decision to mate knowing that it can result in children, cats do not.
post #33 of 51
TNR is against the law where I live. You can also get fined for feeding strays. That said, I couldn't turn a hungry, starving cat away from my door knowing I always have canned and dry food on hand. I wouldn't be able to live with myself.

Usually we've only had friendly cats come around, and we found someplace for them.

I didn't vote as I'm not feeding anyone right now. Though I always travel with cat food in our car, one of the rest stops on the way back from Minneapolis always has stray cats that are foraging for food.
post #34 of 51
I just don't understand how people afford it If there were strays where I live (which there aren't)..I would feel bad, but there is no way I could afford to go around speutering them all. That part of it confuses me..do members that TNR have no problem paying for all of that?

As far as feeding them, I think I don't understand something..how does feeding them cause them to procreate more than if you aren't feeding them? Is it just because they will gather around more and "get to know" eachother more than if you weren't feeding them?

I am all for TNR by the way
post #35 of 51
Lucky for me I do not have a stray cat problem in my neighborhood.

However this did not stop me from trapping my next door neighbors cat and getting him neutered. If you are going to let your cats outside, I don't have a problem with them in my yard..Just make sure their neutered.


I do believe in TNR. I feel this is a viable option. Feral cats are territorial, so if you get rid of some..more will come in their place. So by trapping, fixing and releasing. You are still keeping more cats at bay without over population to the area.
post #36 of 51
You don't have to speuter yourself, there are TNR groups everywhere that can help, financially or by taking them and TNRing them to colonies they maintain. Some people do pay a lot of costs themselves however, but many of them apply for charitable status to write it off against their tax return to help offset the costs.

As far as the relationship between feeding and procreating: They are healthier as they are well fed, you have more cats in one area and the female cats are more likely to not abort the kittens due to illness or hunger.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
many of them apply for charitable status to write it off against their tax return to help offset the costs.
If there's a way to do that as an individual, please share! I would love to be able to take all the money I spend on strays/ferals as a tax deduction. The only thing I'm aware of is applying for a 501(c)3 and that is not for individuals.
post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 
If you're in the States, the cost of registering a company isn't so bad, though it varies from State to State. In NJ it cost less than a spay. And applying for the 501(c)3 is more time consuming that anything - and it's really just waiting for them to get back to you. Then you have the organization file for charitable status. You have to keep track of the accounts - but anything you would spend on the cats, you donate to the organization first.

Laurie
post #39 of 51
I really wish I could afford to TNR this last group but I can't. I have no excuse just no money. Yes I do feed them. If I didn't I have no idea what would become of them and 2 of them are tame. In my neighborhood a stray/feral cat is open season for whatever anyone wants to do. People know I feed this group and that's what keeps them safe (and also invites drop-offs.) I have searched for TNR groups near me but there are none that I've found. I was told that our local pound would just put them down if they were turned in there and the pound uses clinics as a way to find the strays to put them down. And, no, I don't put this past them.

The cheapest vet in my area charges $125 for spay and $95 for neuter with no payment plans and no discount. Not that I can get either of those anyway for altering.

The option we're looking into and working on is before Spring they will be in a fence and seperated while we work on altering. So, if not TNR'ing but still feeding and yet trying our best to what's best for them with a limited budget makes me heartless then so be it.
post #40 of 51
If you go to http://search.petfinder.com/awo/inde...ction=location and type in your area code you can find shelters near you that may be willing to help you with the costs of TNR. We have a great group here that helps and I am very thankful for them.
post #41 of 51
I want to do TNR but unfortunately I can't afford it... I did it with one cat though. I thought he might not be feral because he was sleeping on my porch every day. I trapped him in hopes of being able to find him a good home, but he turned out to be very feral. I was able to find a shelter who would give me their neuter rate for low-income people this one time, and so got him neutered and vaccinated and tested for diseases and I tried to socialize him for several months but he just got more and more wild and unhappy so finally I had to release him because he was just getting more crazed and uncomfortable.
post #42 of 51
if you're in the Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Florida or Oregon area, there is the Neuter Scooter http://76.12.58.134/ns/index.cfm?fa=c.home There's not too many places they'll be right now, but I imagine that's cause of winter. A friend of mine got 2 of her cats done thru this and they were fine. Also, if the cat is a true feral, it's only $20! still only $40 if it's just a stray

I've also heard where groups arrange to have the neuter scooter come to them, so If anyone has a large feral/stray population, it could be worth the group's time to come to you
post #43 of 51
I think that TNR is great - if you know for sure that it is a Feral cat. The part that I have difficulty understanding is how do you identify if the cat is feral or is just a neighboorhod cat belonging to someone locally? My girls are indoors-only but I would be majorly ticked off if someone took it upon themselves to trap and neuter (or euthanize) my cat. Where is the line between a good deed and property theft?
post #44 of 51
Thread Starter 
Sorry - if you let your cat roam and it's on my property, it gets spayed or neutered. I'm sorry you'd be upset if someone fixed one of your cats - but if someone isn't responsible enough to get their animals speutered or to keep an intact animal inside, then I don't care if they get made at me. People shouldn't let their kitties roam without being spayed or neutered.

They can get as mad as they want. If there's a fine for theft of scrotum or ovaries, I'll pay it. Sorry if they're pissed - but I'm pissed anyone would be so irresponsible.

If you had a pure bred you were breeding for blood lines, I doubt very much you would let this kitty roam, and no other cats have any business breeding.

Laurie
post #45 of 51
Thread Starter 
I should add - that for friendly cats, we do attempt to locate the owners.

Strays are pretty identifiable from ferals if they're currently owned. Strays will revert to feral behavior if they've been on their own. And if it's a stray that's acting like a feral, then kitty isn't being properly cared for with its current owners. Sometimes it was an unwilling separation - but if it's been that long that kitty is acting feral, the likelihood of finding the kitty's original home is pretty low.

Laurie
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDG View Post
I should add - that for friendly cats, we do attempt to locate the owners.

Strays are pretty identifiable from ferals if they're currently owned. Strays will revert to feral behavior if they've been on their own. And if it's a stray that's acting like a feral, then kitty isn't being properly cared for with its current owners. Sometimes it was an unwilling separation - but if it's been that long that kitty is acting feral, the likelihood of finding the kitty's original home is pretty low.

Laurie
you can definitely tell the difference between ferals, strays and indoor-outdoor cats in most cases.

Where I live we have a bylaw that states all cats must be microchipped so I check them for chips before bringing them in, if I find a chip, I contact the owner and let them know to pick it up.
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by WELDRWOMN View Post
I think that TNR is great - if you know for sure that it is a Feral cat. The part that I have difficulty understanding is how do you identify if the cat is feral or is just a neighboorhod cat belonging to someone locally? My girls are indoors-only but I would be majorly ticked off if someone took it upon themselves to trap and neuter (or euthanize) my cat. Where is the line between a good deed and property theft?
Well, this will probably upset some people but I can't honestly say I care if the cats I trap belong to somebody. It is legal for me to trap cats that come onto my property and if they're letting their cats run loose then it's a chance they take (I have probably done some people a favor). I spay/neuter every cat I trap. Their outdoor unaltered cats create more cats and if I can nip the process in the bud I will. I have payed to spay/neuter/vet/feed enough cats. I don't need more!
post #48 of 51
Both my girls are spayed and indoor only. I just was playing devil's advocate because I see a lot of neighborhood cats roaming around, but I know that they aren't ferals so I don't mess with them.
post #49 of 51
Thread Starter 
Feral or not, if they're not spayed or neutered they can contribute to the cat overpopulation problem. I'd really rather NOT have to pay for what somebody else should. I really agree with CatCareGiver - I look at it more like we're doing someone a favor.

Laurie
post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by WELDRWOMN View Post
I think that TNR is great - if you know for sure that it is a Feral cat. The part that I have difficulty understanding is how do you identify if the cat is feral or is just a neighboorhod cat belonging to someone locally? My girls are indoors-only but I would be majorly ticked off if someone took it upon themselves to trap and neuter (or euthanize) my cat. Where is the line between a good deed and property theft?


If you don't want terrible things to happen to your pet, keep them indoors.

My neighbors cat was spraying in my garage and around my house. If my neighbor wasn't going to do fix him, I would and did. I had left spay/neuter coupons on their door. I waited 2 months for them to fix their cat. Didn't happen. ( Might I add that these coupons were for 10 dollars to fix a cat, they were through my work)

So one day, Mr. Orange tabby came to work with me. His cat doesn't wear a collar ID tags, nor did he have a microchip. What I did was completely legal. And that's all that matters. Now Mr. Orange kitty comes over and get's loves and pets. My garage is happy as well.
post #51 of 51
When I first started feeding, I had no idea what TNR was. Oh, yeah, it's the band playing in the club on the strip!

When I discovered the program, I tried. I borrowed a trap from my vet. Then she gives me all HER rules. She only takes 2 ferals a day. You have to make an appointment a month in advance since she is so busy. If you miss your appointment because the cat won't cooperate, you pay for it anyway. Spay or neuter, it is $100.00. FORGET IT! None of the cats would cooperate and I catch a possum that scared me speechless when I saw him in the trap! I cancel the appointment and decide to look elsewhere.

That's when I met Mercedes. She's the Animal Control officer in my town. She lends out traps, takes the cat from you, and gets it neutered. She used her contacts to find a vet willing to do it extremely cheap providing she brings the cat that morning, and it spends the night recouping at her house.
She also socializes feral kittens trapped by her contacts. With Mercedes help, I've gotten all of my females spayed and 6 kittens adopted out.

So there are programs out there! And the females left in my colony (just 2 left out of the 6 I started with.) are healthy and don't leave the yard.
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