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Should we neutur our cat?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
We adopted a 5 yr old male from the Humane Society 2 weeks ago and was told he was neutured. We found out today that he's NOT neutured. I feel we need to have this done, however, my husband says that since he is not an "outdoor" cat, we have nothing to worry about. Also, I've also heard that they should be neutured when they are young and he's already age 5, is he too old? If we don't have him neutured, what type of potential problems could be caused? As always, thanks in advance. We know little to nothing about cats and it's really nice to be able to chat with all you guys for advice.
post #2 of 21
Yes, most definitely. Spraying is a very undesirable behavior that unneutered males may have. Here is a short article:

http://www.thecatsite.com/Care/177/S...Your-Cats.html

Glad you are finding the site helpful.
post #3 of 21
Even though he's an indoor cat, it is best to have him neutered. Because you adopted him declawed, it is especially important that he never escape outside - but he'll be less prone to behavioral problems in the house from passing cats and strays if he doesn't have those hormones driving his behavior.

There are also health benefits down the road to having him neutered. He doesn't have any emotional attachment to his "bits," and everyone - including him - will be happier.

Here is a list of links that will take you to many articles on reasons why to spay and neuter: http://www.savesamoa.org/html/spay_neuter.html#Why

Laurie
post #4 of 21
I'm very surprised that the shelter told you he was neutered when he was not - its pretty obvious in a male. If you don't neuter him he WILL spray if he hasn't already - and that means marking furniture, carpet, clothes, walls, etc. - tom cat urine is very strong and sometimes you can't get it all out (especially on wood floors or carpet).

Not neutering puts him at a higher risk for cancers. And sooner or later when cats come in heat outside your cat will find a way out - which puts him at risk for fights with other toms (and more medical bills), exposure to FELV or FIP - both are not curable.

So if you love him, then get him neutered. A cat is almost never too old to be neutered - he's still young at 5 yrs old.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
I appreciate the replies and it confirmed what I already believed, now I need to convince hubby. Also, we've already learned the hard way about "spraying", we thought it was just part of the adjustment period in a new home.
post #6 of 21
There are health benefits for the cat, too, such as less risk of certain tumors and cancers.

http://www.sniksnak.com/benefits.html
http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/neutering.html
http://maxshouse.com/spaying_and_neutering.htm
post #7 of 21
I would tell you to suprise the hubby by getting him nuetered but that sure wouldn't be nice! hehe, Im sure you can talk him into it once you tell him the great advantages of having them fixed! It is weird that he's declawed and not neutered tho.... Good Luck to ya! There is some stuff that can get the smell of spray out too, I have some but for the life of me can't figure out what it is since I havn't used it in forever! Anyone else know what that stuff is called??
post #8 of 21
Eric doesn't get a choice in the matter in this house. Everything with 4 legs gets spayed or neutered immediately.
post #9 of 21
Yeah, I dont give my DH the option either!! Its benificial to everyone in the long run!!
post #10 of 21
Yeah, that's not the sort of thing I would even talk to my husband about. It's just a non-issue in my mind: every furbaby gets spayed/neutered, that's what a responsible pet owner does. If $ is the issue, go back to the humane society and ask if they can neuter him (since you did adopt him under the impression that he was). Another option is to find a low-cost spay/neuter clinic to do it (the one by me does male cats for $28).
post #11 of 21
If he's already started spraying as you imply, why would your husband even debate this? Doe he like the smell of unneutered cat pee? Some people think mistakenly that its unnatural to fix an animal. Quite the contrary is true - its unnatural to have un-fixed animals in your home.

Domestication is a 2 sided idea. We make a deal with our animals: In exchange for their companionship we provide food, shelter, and health and companionship as well. A domesticated cat has no need whatsoever to be sexually available. It makes no sense.

There are approximately 36 species of cats in the world. Many of them are endangered, none have large populations with the exception of one, the domestic house cat. Domestication is a survival strategy that allows for rapid and massive population growth. Domestic cats no longer need unfettered reproduction as a survival tactic.

Unneutered males are routinely kicked out of home because they smell. Then they inseminate females and contribute to the gross overpopulation of the cat population and this in turn contributes to the death of millions of cats every year.

Save a cat's life, save *many* cats lives: get your male fixed.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by labronner View Post
I appreciate the replies and it confirmed what I already believed, now I need to convince hubby. Also, we've already learned the hard way about "spraying", we thought it was just part of the adjustment period in a new home.
If you haven't already, make sure you neutralize the odor where ever he has sprayed. I have had good luck saturating the area with plain white vinegar and allowing it to dry on its own. Nature's Miracle and a product called Anti-Icky-Poo also seem to work well, they are enzymatic cleaners and can be found at pet stores.

After he is neutered, the spraying behavior should taper off as the hormones leave his system.
post #13 of 21
I just want to say that I second the use of Nature's Miracle. I catsat an intact male once who definitely sprayed the room, but the Nature's Miracle took the smell right out! You might also invest in a handheld black light that you can buy at pet stores. Urine glows under the light, so you can find the trouble spots faster.

Good luck convincing your husband, but I'll bet that it won't take long before the smell makes him cave!
post #14 of 21
Just to pick up on a point that was made earlier... How old is too old for a spay? My inlaws have a 10year old female with some weird personality issues who seems to permanently be in heat. Ive been trying to talk her into getting her spayed, but shes adamant 10 is too old and too dangerous. Opinions? I was planning on asking my vet next time I see him anyway
post #15 of 21
On a 10 year old, have them do the preop blood work and talk to the vet about what kinds of anesthetics they would be using. There are some anesthetics available that are safer to use in older cats, like propofol and isoflurane or sevoflurane. Additional fluids before or during surgery and monitoring (blood pressure especially) are a must for the older kitties. My older kitties all had anesthesia for dentals and other issues and came through them just fine. In fact, your inlaws may want to do a dental at the same time to avoid having to put her under twice. A cat isn't too old for spaying, though they can eventually get too sick if they aren't likely to survive surgery. If their cat is basically healthy, then there shouldn't be a problem. Besides, unspayed cats are at risk for uterine cancers and pyometra, both of which would be treated by surgery plus medicines (chemo, antibiotics, etc.). It's a much better bet to do the surgery now, when she's healthy, rather than wait until she gets an infection or cancer.
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sakura View Post
go back to the humane society and ask if they can neuter him (since you did adopt him under the impression that he was). Another option is to find a low-cost spay/neuter clinic to do it (the one by me does male cats for $28).
Have you contacted the shelter you got him from to inform them of their error? I'd think if they are a responsible shelter that they'd neuter him for you at no additional charge since they led you to believe he was neutered in the first place.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by twstychik View Post
Have you contacted the shelter you got him from to inform them of their error? I'd think if they are a responsible shelter that they'd neuter him for you at no additional charge since they led you to believe he was neutered in the first place.
I second that! I'm sure the shelter will do it for you whether at a minimal charge or nothing at all. You SHOULD let them know that you adopted a neutered male who is not neutered. That's a big OOPS. How could they miss that one?

Good luck with your kitty and welcome to the cat world. It is a very dangerous world, this one. My husband told me yesterday, we started with one kitty in June of '06 and now we have 3. How did that happen? They're just so darn cute!!!
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by merlynn's mom View Post
That's a big OOPS. How could they miss that one?
I wonder the same thing. Like someone else said... it's usually pretty evident if a boy kitty has or has not been neutered.
post #19 of 21
Isnt it out of context for a humane society to adopt out a cat that is not spayed or neutered? All of the ones from my area wont let you adopt one unless it is done.They either have it done before they go home or they give you a piece of paper to take to the vet to have it done for free to control the pet population. I would definately have it done tho. I think he will be much more comfortable and happier. It would help keep you from becoming upset with him when he sprays things.
post #20 of 21
Well, it could be that the cat has unusually small bits. That and a really inexperienced volunteer, and I guess it could happen. When you get him neutered, do make sure the vet checks to make sure the testicles have descended properly--otherwise they could miss one and have to put him under again to get it. (It doesn't often happen, but since the shelter missed your cat's, I'm wondering.) It could just be that they assumed he's neutered because he's declawed.

<rant>
And what were his previous owners thinking, anyway! They declawed him, but didn't neuter him, so when he wants to fight for females, he'll get ripped up by the other tom! Just plain mean. Not to mention the usual risks of declawing. At least he's got a good home now, poor guy.
</rant>

In my area, the Humane Society gives low income people vouchers to take to their vets so they can get their animals neutered. My Tiny got his neuter for only $20, though it did cost extra for the rabies shot I got him at the same time.

Before his neuter, Tiny was much more skittish and aggressive than afterwards. During the month after his neuter, Tiny settled down a great deal, relaxed, and became more playful. (He also lost a bit of weight, but only about half a pound, nothing dangerous. He's eating fine now and he's slender but muscular and healthy. Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if he's back to his previous weight by now.) Now, a few months after his neuter, Tiny's really beginning to overcome his history as a stray. For the first time, he's sitting on my lap and purring--though he's still tense while he does it. I imagine he'll be rather a snuggler when he gets to be five or six; but now he's only a year old and still very energetic. You should see the kitty crazies at 3 a.m.... just stay out of the way!
post #21 of 21
I think the shelter might take care of it if you tell them about it! Even if they won't you can get it done for a fairly good price. We just got Stuart done and it was $75 total (small town). It's a very important thing. If he keeps spraying every cat you get will probably pee in those spots he sprayed.
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