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polygraph test

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
So what your opinion on polygraph test? i have to take one for work on saturday morning,(if i remember to get out of bed).

I see them as a waste of time, i have had them before for a job long time ago, then later when money was stolen 20 years ago or so.
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
So what your opinion on polygraph test? i have to take one for work on saturday morning,(if i remember to get out of bed).

I see them as a waste of time, i have had them before for a job long time ago, then later when money was stolen 20 years ago or so.
Well, IMHO, from the limited studies I've read, they don't work well.

It's a power trip that's for sure.
post #3 of 26
I don't know what I think about them. I can see the need for them in certain instances. What are the stats on how reliable they are, anyone know?
post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
So what your opinion on polygraph test? i have to take one for work on saturday morning,(if i remember to get out of bed).

I see them as a waste of time, i have had them before for a job long time ago, then later when money was stolen 20 years ago or so.
NOWADAYS, they work GREAT!!! They are very reliable and good tool for technology. We use them even though they are not admissible in court (archaic laws ). If the defendant passes, the DAs will often back down; if the defendant fails, it is a valuable tool in helping him/her decide what kind of plea deal to accept.
Please let us know what it was like - I'd like to take one myself but it's too expensive, even though I could get one at the "public defender" rate. What an adventure
post #5 of 26
I think they're only as good as the polygraph operator. I had one years ago when I had to be bonded for a part-time job. The guy who gave it to me turned out to be the father of a girl I'd gone to high school with, so he actually showed and explained the results to me. It was pretty interesting.
post #6 of 26
JCat makes a good point. Our polygraphers come with a great circum vitae, which is why we use them. And the equipment gets better & better all the time.

here's a link that talks about polygraph testing from their national association:
http://www.polygraph.org/faq.cfm
post #7 of 26
Why would your employer make you take a polygraph? That just seems like a human rights violation to me.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadie's Mom View Post
Why would your employer make you take a polygraph?
That's what i was wondering. I can understand drug screenings/etc...but a polygraph?
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadie's Mom View Post
Why would your employer make you take a polygraph? That just seems like a human rights violation to me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
That's what i was wondering. I can understand drug screenings/etc...but a polygraph?
Employees working with money are often bonded, and the insurer usually requires a polygraph test before agreeing to insure the employer against loss caused by the employee.

IT professionals might also be viewed as "potential security risks", as are, for instance, teachers in some places. I had to undergo a complete background check before being allowed to teach at a state-accredited junior college in Baden-Württemberg. I've actually witnessed colleagues being fired soon after being hired because of their political/religious affiliations, i.e., don't bother to apply if you're a member of a neo-Nazi group, the Muslim Brotherhood, KKK, Scientology, or the like. I have a rather delightful colleague from South Africa, who taught in the U.S. for several years, and then moved to Germany. As he puts it: "Trust me - the FBI and the BKA (the German equivalent of the FBI) can vouch for me!"

It's a nuisance, but...
post #10 of 26
Personally I don't put any stock in their reliability. Good luck to you - hope you pass!

http://antipolygraph.org/lie-behind-...e-detector.pdf
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by catcaregiver View Post
Personally I don't put any stock in their reliability. Good luck to you - hope you pass!

http://antipolygraph.org/lie-behind-...e-detector.pdf

I think they are lying.
post #12 of 26
Tricia has it right on. You're handy-dandy IT Person (called formerly as a System Administrator) has rights to just about anything you can think of the network. Your employment information, possibly social security #s, etc. There are many cases of IT people getting irritated at the place they word at then planting software bombs on a server (that basically delete everything on the server) and also identity theft.

In short they're usually underpaid and overworked. Businesses really don't "vest" much into the IT person other than "Make sure it keeps working". About 5 years ago an IT person was RARELY screened.

Now thanks to laws & standards like HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, ISO, etc, that incorporate IT into their audits, by placing a few CEOs into orange jumpsuits really made business open their eyes and realize that IT can be a huge liability (i.e. when I started my last job as a System Admin, I didn't have a background check or anything done on me. The same week I started they gave me the code to the safe were all the rifles and bullets were stored).

[/hijack]

Anyhoo, like Tricia said, they're only as good as the polygraph operator. I've only been told of stories from government polygraphs in which the person(s) questioning you will ask you the same question 5 times but in 5 different ways...so it messes with your head
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadie's Mom View Post
Why would your employer make you take a polygraph? That just seems like a human rights violation to me.

Cause someone walked out with computer hardware worth about 8,000 dollars.


Quote:
Originally Posted by catcaregiver View Post
Personally I don't put any stock in their reliability. Good luck to you - hope you pass!

http://antipolygraph.org/lie-behind-...e-detector.pdf
oh i am not worried about that, they have never been able to get a baseline, on me. which means they cant tell anything.

which is why i dont think they work at all.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
oh i am not worried about that, they have never been able to get a baseline, on me. which means they cant tell anything.

which is why i dont think they work at all.
It's just the company's way of saying "hey we're exercising due diligence"
post #15 of 26
Moment of Truth

Here you go, a reality show with a lie detector. You knew it had to be coming.
post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
lol hate reality TV, but they said example of questions are
Example questions include:
Have you ever lied to get a job?- of course
Do you find any of your spouse’s friends attractive?- yep
Do you like your mother-in-law?-dont have one
Have you ever stolen anything from work?-nope
Would you cheat on your spouse if you knew you could get away with it?-Nope * lol i am to lazy to cheat.

not hard questions to tell the turth to
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Employees working with money are often bonded, and the insurer usually requires a polygraph test before agreeing to insure the employer against loss caused by the employee.

IT professionals might also be viewed as "potential security risks", as are, for instance, teachers in some places. I had to undergo a complete background check before being allowed to teach at a state-accredited junior college in Baden-Württemberg. I've actually witnessed colleagues being fired soon after being hired because of their political/religious affiliations, i.e., don't bother to apply if you're a member of a neo-Nazi group, the Muslim Brotherhood, KKK, Scientology, or the like. I have a rather delightful colleague from South Africa, who taught in the U.S. for several years, and then moved to Germany. As he puts it: "Trust me - the FBI and the BKA (the German equivalent of the FBI) can vouch for me!"

It's a nuisance, but...
I've been bonded at jobs before and never had to take a polygraph test.

They do a criminal background check, that's all. Never heard of having to take a polygraph test before.

It must be some kind of policy in the US, because I sure don't think they do that in Canada.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
lol i guess this no longer matters since i wont even be in the US come saturday

hmm so does this make me look gulity
post #19 of 26
I would refuse to take it. There is a reason they are inadmissable in court - because they are not accurate, not good as evidence and are misleading and can lead to prejudice. My brother (crown prosecutor) strongly advised all of us that if we ever were in a position where we were asked to take one - to refuse under any and all circumstances. They are pointless, a waste of time and highly unreliable. And should be illegal IMO.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunasmom View Post
It's just the company's way of saying "hey we're exercising due diligence"
No kidding... also, the honest people who take them have a tenancy to get REALLY honest. It scares them that they are hooked up to a machine and that can mess with it too.

I think if Bruce refused to take it they'd most likely fire him, so if you really like your job you may want to go a head and take it.

I took one in college as part of an experiment in the Psychology Department. The operator put a cuff around my upper arm and it slid off. (my arms are really narrow and skinny) He said: "Oh! Time to break out the kids cuff!"

Kids. Cuff. That was a sad moment in my life.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
I think they are lying.
hahahaha
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
I've been bonded at jobs before and never had to take a polygraph test.

They do a criminal background check, that's all. Never heard of having to take a polygraph test before.

It must be some kind of policy in the US, because I sure don't think they do that in Canada.
I simply think it was company policy, because I had other jobs where I was bonded, and didn't have to take a polygraph. All employees of that particular convenience/deli store chain had to be vetted in that manner. It may have had something to do with the extremely high turnover; we were certainly robbed often enough.
post #23 of 26
I read somewhere that polygraphs can make an innocent person look guilty, and a guilty person look innocent...
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
I think if Bruce refused to take it they'd most likely fire him, so if you really like your job you may want to go a head and take it.


If he refused, that just says to management I have something to hide and automatically becomes suspicious (unless he has medical reasons not to be hooked up to one...can't think of any though)

Anyhoo, it's best just to take it and get it over with. Well, once you get home.
post #25 of 26
I don't think it says that at all. By refusing, he may well just be saying `I don't think this is fair or even legal, so I won't do it'. I think that forcing an employee (note I said `forcing', not `asking', because there doesn't appear to be much choice here) to take a polygraph test is a violation of their right to privacy, as an employee. Goodness, these days you can't even ask someone their date of birth or their marital status. And yet a polygraph is ok? Goodness - I would feel as violated being asked to do that as I would being asked to go have sex with the boss to keep my job. I think it's disgraceful. It presumes guilty until proven innocent. Unacceptable.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Employees working with money are often bonded, and the insurer usually requires a polygraph test before agreeing to insure the employer against loss caused by the employee.

IT professionals might also be viewed as "potential security risks", as are, for instance, teachers in some places. I had to undergo a complete background check before being allowed to teach at a state-accredited junior college in Baden-Württemberg. I've actually witnessed colleagues being fired soon after being hired because of their political/religious affiliations, i.e., don't bother to apply if you're a member of a neo-Nazi group, the Muslim Brotherhood, KKK, Scientology, or the like. I have a rather delightful colleague from South Africa, who taught in the U.S. for several years, and then moved to Germany. As he puts it: "Trust me - the FBI and the BKA (the German equivalent of the FBI) can vouch for me!"

It's a nuisance, but...
Thankyou for the explination That makes sense now!
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