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Petey is in danger of being declawed... - Page 2

post #31 of 40
I read that Petey is only clawing the back of the sofa. Is it possible to move the sofa so the back of it is against the wall, and he can't get to it? Then, try spraying the rest of the sofa with Feliway to discourage him from "re-marking".
post #32 of 40
Cassi used to claw up the corner of our loveseat.
It immediately stopped (with no training) the very second I put a sisal scratching post in the livingroom.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pami View Post
I dont understand what you are saying. Once you declaw him, he is declawed you can then decide you would rather train him with a scratching post.

Declawing should never be an option. The least option shouldnt be considered. Hopefully, anyone who doesnt know or understand what declawing entails would do a thorough search of it and understand it fully, the pain and the mutilation that is causes to cats.
Pami, the other poster was saying if people were told by the vet that declawing their cat would cause them drastic and destructive personality changes that would magnify if not introduce new problems, they might change their tunes about "not wanting to try this other stuff that might or might not work". But some vets conveniently neglect to point that stuff out to people, because declawing is an expensive procedure in that it requires an overnight stay, so doing both procedures at the same time means the vet earns a lot more money.

The lady who runs the rescue group that my cat came from gave me some excellent advice when she brought him home to me: "If your vet ever mentions declawing as an option for any behavioral problem, you should just politely say that you'll think about it and get back to him/her and then get busy finding a new vet. That vet should know better, so if s/he is disregarding all the complications that can arise due to declawing, that vet does not practice for the love of animals, but is in it for the money. You and your cat can do better." Our vet is one of the good ones, but I appreciated her warning just the same.
post #34 of 40
I feel I should add my two cents as I was very much in a debate of what to do with our kitten. He is the first cat I've ever owned or been around really. My husband said first thing that Jack needed to be declawed (he had lived with someone who had a cat that ripped his things to shreds). I had set up the appointment and everything. Then I read more information and understood what it involved and told my husband I wouldn't do it. Jack was young and I knew that we could teach him what was right and have it stick. My husband doubted me, and he still may have a little doubt but not what it used to be.

We've had Jack since October 31, Halloween and I know that I made the right choice. Once a week Jack gets his nails clip and he no longer scratches the couch. He actually has many places he likes to scratch--he's not picky (cardboard boxes, plain pieces of wood, and sisal rope).

Surprisingly my dad was the most happy we choose not to declaw. He has never owned a cat or lived with a cat (maybe some barn cats) and he has strong opinions about declawing being horrible. I think he was proud I put my foot down with my husband and made a good decision.

Leslie
post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 
My mom actually talked to our vet about declawing Petey. The vet said that in his experience, behavioral problems from declawing are extremely rare. This made me afraid that my parents were going to go ahead and declaw Petey, but my dad decided he didn't want to! So for now Petey gets to keep his claws, and I will keep working on teaching him that the couch is not a scratching post! I'm going to look at cat trees at Petsmart tomorrow. Petey doesn't claw anything else, just the couch, and I think a cat tree will help because he'll have something fun to run and jump and play on!
post #36 of 40
Since I assembled my new cat tree last weekend, neither one of my cats (both are about 8-9 months old) have clawed my couch, chair, or hung off of the bathroom doorframe.

CR40
post #37 of 40
Little Forrest had started to scratch on the back of my living room chairs and couch. We have a tall cat tree and 4 scratching posts. He'll use the scratchers but preferred the chairs and couch After a few weeks of daily spraying of Feliway on the furniture he finally stopped scratching them.

He did try scratching on different furniture that wasn't sprayed with Feliway and so I had to spray them also. It cost me a fortune for all that Feliway but it saved my furniture.
post #38 of 40
My cat used to scratch the couch whenever I walked in the door, but after I grabbed him and put him by the scratching post enough times, he finally learned where he is allowed to scratch.....and that he gets a big hug when he scratches the right place (he likes hugs, so it's a good reward for him). Just be persistent (and patient)!
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet72947 View Post
My mom actually talked to our vet about declawing Petey. The vet said that in his experience, behavioral problems from declawing are extremely rare. This made me afraid that my parents were going to go ahead and declaw Petey, but my dad decided he didn't want to! So for now Petey gets to keep his claws, and I will keep working on teaching him that the couch is not a scratching post! I'm going to look at cat trees at Petsmart tomorrow. Petey doesn't claw anything else, just the couch, and I think a cat tree will help because he'll have something fun to run and jump and play on!
Well I have to say that I've had the same experience. I grew up with four cats, all declawed and they were the best cats, no behavior issues at all. They all lived long and healthy lives (one is still alive and one just passed last week at 18 years old). I have two 8 month kittens myself who are declawed and they have been just fine ever since I brought them home. I know most folks are so opposed to declawing, but I've never had any issues with cats who have gotten the procedure done. That's not to say it doesn't happen, but I've never seen it myself.
post #40 of 40
Not having it done is not just about them having behavioral problems afterwards, its about it being cruel to the cat. If you research what the procedure consist of you will understand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orltwa View Post
Well I have to say that I've had the same experience. I grew up with four cats, all declawed and they were the best cats, no behavior issues at all. They all lived long and healthy lives (one is still alive and one just passed last week at 18 years old). I have two 8 month kittens myself who are declawed and they have been just fine ever since I brought them home. I know most folks are so opposed to declawing, but I've never had any issues with cats who have gotten the procedure done. That's not to say it doesn't happen, but I've never seen it myself.
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