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Chronic constipation

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Tink is a blue point siamese and I know that constipation is common in that breed. He's been on Science Diet (bad food but I didn't know it back then), which gave him very serious bouts of constipation (had to have enemas), Natural Balance (more frequent constipation but self-correcting), and now Wellness (canned), which this this is the first bout since changing food last June (which, is actually pretty good, considering how frequent (every 2 weeks) he had it before). On the Natural Balance, we tried the kitty treats with papain and pumpkin, which did nothing. (Pet-a-malt doesn't work either). I like the Wellness. Overall, he does well on it--good coat, good energy, bright eyes, good weight ... and he likes it! But I would like to see him have NO constipation....the muscle spasms that go with it are painful (although with the Wellness, he just seems to be uncomfortable, it is better) and he does have a water fountain.

Has anyone been able to prevent constipation? What did you do?
post #2 of 14
We have 2 blue points and have not experienced constipation with either so I am no help to you. Hopefully someone will be along soon with some answers for you.
post #3 of 14
SOUBLE fiber ... I am a human with it and have a dog with it ...

pumpkin , squash are mainly insouble great for the GET OVER THIS and can be used in moderation long haul/...

talk to your vet about veggies ... carrots , brocoli ... baby foods that are free of anything but the veggies are a good start

slippery elm (I use powder on food).... probiotic s and pre biotics ..... apple pectin ( got capsules at the health food store) ....

I use a green supplement , slippery and apple daily ... BUT WORK with YOUR VET
post #4 of 14
Did you try mixing actual canned pumpkin into the food? That might be more effective than treats with some pumpkin in them. And the more moisture, the better. One tablespoon a day is a good amount to try.

If it's that persistent and none of the usual methods are working, he should probably be seen by a vet. The condition may be serious enough to require treatment or medication.
post #5 of 14
My mom's cat Jesse had to be hospitalized for severe constipation recently. He was completely impacted with "cement-like" stool and had to be put under sedation and manually "cleaned out". We don't know for sure if this is the start of a condition called megacolon, or if it was just a one-time really severe constipation (he was adopted in September, after spending six months in rabies quarantine with his rescuer. She found him as an injured stray).

Right now, we are giving him canned pumpkin (this can be mixed in food, but Jesse really likes it, and will eat it plain), a medication called cisipride (helps with motility--the colon's ability to contract and move stool), and 1/4 tsp of Miralax, an over the counter stool softener. He was on lactulose, a prescription stool softener, but it's very syrupy and sweet and was difficult to get him to take it. Miralax is an OTC powder, and he is fine with eating it mixed in a bit of his Wellness.

Like your cat, Jesse was also on Science Diet dry when we adopted him. Looking back, his poop was small and very dry from the start, even after we switched him to an all-wet, high quality canned diet. Now he is pooping normally and we are crossing fingers that it continues.

It isn't clear from your post whether you tried actual pumpkin, or if it was a treat containing pumpkin. I'd try adding a TBS or so of pumpkin to his diet per meal and see if that helps.
post #6 of 14
Buster was diagnosed with megacolon in March and suffers from chronic constipation. He has a very strict regimen consisting of Cisapride twice daily followed by Kristalose and Senna herbs mixed in his food. His condition has progressed to the point where he can't poop at all unless he is loaded up on medicine. Otherwise, he just strains in the litter pan. We tried everything but the herbs seem to work the best. I got a prescription from an alternative vet, who did acupuncture. It was the best decision despite the high cost.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
I have worked with the vet closely and we've gone thru all of her suggestions. The pumpkin was real pumpkin (first canned, then I bought one and cooked it (more fiber that way) but it didn't work. Tink doesn't have mega colon (thank God)...the Miralax sounds promising, I'll ask the vet about it, the slippery elm and the apple pectin.

The vet and I are trying to avoid medicating Tink because he won't take pills. At all. Not crushed, not hidden, not gently placed in his mouth--the last time he was pilled (tape worm), the vet, 3 assistants, and a pill gun were unsuccessful. (The vet--a really wonderful woman--has told me she would rather put her eyes out than try to give Tink another pill). But a small amount of powder in his Wellness is worth a shot.

This bout only lasted a day and self-corrected. We're hopeful that it was something he caught and ate (although he's the world's worst hunter (and yes, I have a secure back yard that Tink can't escape from and pet doors)...Thank you for helping! And if you think of anything else to try, please let me know
post #8 of 14
When this first started happening, the vet also suggested pumpkin. However, it didn't do anything either for Buster. We tried all sorts of bran products but to no avail. A lot of vets, including my own, think that bran is counterproductive for chronically constipated cats. In other words, high fiber tends to get very bulky and get stuck; thus unable to pass. Now I keep Buster on a low-fiber diet because it will make his poop smaller and easier to pass. The vet suggested Prescription Diet I/D but my other vet thinks it's too bland.

We also used Dulcolax for awhile, which worked, but I stopped because I was worried about the long-term consequences. Definitely ask about Miralax but I wouldn't use it long-term because it could cause dependence.
post #9 of 14
Actually, Lactulose and Kristolose both carry the exact same warnings about long-term use and dependence as Miralax. Miralax is also an inert, undigestible osmotic (draws water into the colon), and it's been approved for safe use in children.

If Kristolose is working for you, there's certainly no reason to switch. We may end up with it ourselves, but for now, the Miralax and pumpkin, along with the cisipride, is working well.

Have you ever checked out the Yahoo Feline Megacolon group. It is for owners of cats with chronic constipation as well as those with a megacolon dx. I got a lot of great info and support there. My vet had never heard of Kristolose or Miralax, but when Jesse had to be syringed (with much vigorous protestation) for the Lactulose, I mentioned it and she did some research and approved the Miralax.
post #10 of 14
Our vet suggested switching to Hill's rx w/d, but I really don't like the ingredients (it's basically very expensive garbage).

Jesse seems to be doing well with the Wellness and Eagle Pack holistic, along with the added fiber from pumpkin, but should a low-fiber diet become necessary, several posters on the Yahoo Feline Megacolon group mentioned Eukanuba low-residue. It's not on the level of Wellness, but the ingredients are better than the Hill's prescription foods, and it seems to be more palatable.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sablemerle View Post
Our vet suggested switching to Hill's rx w/d, but I really don't like the ingredients (it's basically very expensive garbage).

Jesse seems to be doing well with the Wellness and Eagle Pack holistic, along with the added fiber from pumpkin, but should a low-fiber diet become necessary, several posters on the Yahoo Feline Megacolon group mentioned Eukanuba low-residue. It's not on the level of Wellness, but the ingredients are better than the Hill's prescription foods, and it seems to be more palatable.
W/d is a wt control food //// look at other wt control foods and there fiber levels/// when it comes to MAJOR and ON going health issues I put ingrediants behind results... WORK with your vet... ie take in food you like and discuss
post #12 of 14
work with our vet. I assumed it goes without saying that *all* treatment and diet decisions for a cat with a chronic condition should be run by your vet.

Jesse came to us obese (not unusual for an emaciated stray who was free-fed as a foster). Since going on a canned diet, he has been slimming down at an acceptable and safe rate.

One of the things I love about our current vet is that she is the first to admit that she didn't get the most in-depth training on feline nutrition in vet school, and she is eager to read and review any research paper I bring to her attention.

Prescription diets are great, but not much use if the cat won't eat it.
post #13 of 14
Like Blast-Off-Girl, my cat has been diagnosed with Megacolon after 2 years of chronic constipation. She is overweight, which doesn't help. We've tried everything, and I mean EVERYTHING suggested by the vet and the good people here. Increased fiber made it worse, switching from dry to all wet food made it worse too. The only thing that worked for us is a diet of grain-free dry food (Orijen) and Lactulose (a prescribed liquid stool softener) twice a day. She has been constipation free since August (which is very good!) and has not even strained in the litterbox once.

This is an issue you need to keep a very close eye on. Once you hear her straining or notice no poop in the box, it's time to do something quick. Don't wait and hope it gets better on it's own because it usually won't and the vet bills can get quite costly.

I have some feline enemas on hand just in case of an emergency, but haven't had to use them and hopefully never will.

I know what you're going through and it's no fun at all, for you or your kitty. I'm so glad mine is pain free and poops every day!!!!

Feel free to PM me if you want... I'll listen and try to help. Good luck!
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sablemerle View Post
Actually, Lactulose and Kristolose both carry the exact same warnings about long-term use and dependence as Miralax. Miralax is also an inert, undigestible osmotic (draws water into the colon), and it's been approved for safe use in children.

If Kristolose is working for you, there's certainly no reason to switch. We may end up with it ourselves, but for now, the Miralax and pumpkin, along with the cisipride, is working well.

Have you ever checked out the Yahoo Feline Megacolon group. It is for owners of cats with chronic constipation as well as those with a megacolon dx. I got a lot of great info and support there. My vet had never heard of Kristolose or Miralax, but when Jesse had to be syringed (with much vigorous protestation) for the Lactulose, I mentioned it and she did some research and approved the Miralax.
Thanks for the tip regarding the Yahoo Group. I was always thinking that there should be group dedicated entirely to feline megacolon since it seems to be such a common problem and major headache for cat owners. Glad to know there is a group specifically for that purpose!

Honestly, I am not sure whether Buster fully meets the criteria of megacolon. We never did the x-rays because I couldn't afford it. Another vet thinks that muscle atrophy is causing the constipation.

Unfortunately, Buster's constipation has reached the point where he can no longer poop at all without the aid of intervention. That's why he is so dependent on laxatives now.
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