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Just HORRIBLE... - Page 2

post #31 of 41
I personally dont test or vacc mine for FeLV, and when I had to deal with a locum vet, I had to explain myself, she disagreed with me, but did accept that they weren't getting vacc'd, my personal vet is fine with it. As my own cat isn't tested, i dont test fosters either. I do disagree with FeLV testing as being preventative medicine though - all it tells you is that they have it (and the test that was done on these is very inaccurate in teh UK, 42% of positives are false), you can't prevent them getting any of the illnessess associated with FeLV. I am always with mine for bloods, I left one of mine and it was a nightmare, I said then I would never do that again.
post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
Actually, most pets are better without their owners, especially owners who are stressed and can't handle the procedure. Veterinary staff are generally calm, quick, and gentle, and the procedure is much more safe and stress-free in the back room.

In fact, my dogs got their kennel cough boosters without me this week for this exact reason. I dropped them off at the clinic, went to work across the hall, and the community practice docs did their thing without one word from me... and they didn't do anything other than give them the vaccination I asked for either.
Well, that may work for you, but I don't believe that the majority of pets are better without their owners when strangers poke and prod at them. My cat, Possum, comes to me for comfort and buries his head in the crook of my arm when we got to the vet's. I'd rather be there for him.

There are only 2 reasons I would let a vet take my pets to the back where I can't see them, and one is completely selfish. 1)surgery/operation; 2) when they express the anal glands. As someone who almost got sick just from hearing about it on the phone, I'm just going to let them do that far away from me. Actually, I kind of feel sick just thinking about it right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
Docs know more than I do, I tend to listen to mine, as well as see him regularly.
Anyway, I'm glad you go to your doctor regularly, but you probably shouldn't think that they always know more than you. I've told my doctor about things he's never heard about that I have.

It's good that you listen to your doctor, but I would also like one who listens to me. My previous doctor, before the wonderful one I have now, chose not to listen to me when I told her about something it had taken me months to gather the courage to tell her about, which set me back another 3 years. It's pretty crushing when you're a desperate 15-year-old.

If my vet refused to listen to me, I'd change vets.

Tricia
post #33 of 41
I can understand being upset about not finding the vein and bad bedside manners. And I can understand not wanting to vaccinate for FeLV...but I don't understand why you don't want them tested. I have watched a kitten die from FeLV (my uncle had a kitten that had it). It's horrible. My Mom lost a whole colony of barn cats (all but 1 died) to FIV. The barn cats roamed in a suburban area, as it was a hobby farm. If you have other cats in your home, it's sure unfair to them to expose them to such contagious deadly diseases.

I admit I never had Raven and Nabu tested. But the clinic had their histories from the previous owner and didn't ask me to do that. When we adopted Stimpy, he was tested for FeLV/FIV before being allowed to mingle with Raven & Nabu.

For most shelters who do not test for FeLV/FIV, it's a funding issue. If they have the money, shelters will test. It's heartbreaking for an owner to take home a new kitten, only to get it tested and find out they have FeLV or FIV.
post #34 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
I am surprised nobody picked this out. If you didn't get them tested and they got sick THEY would suffer the consequences.
Leslie
I am surprised you did not read the rest of my post. Vaccines do not protect everyone or everything. Studies show that even vaccinated animals and humans can and do still get the disease they were vax'd against even though they have been vaccinated. Some suffer serious ill health after vaccine induced reactions.
Walking around feeling smug that your cats are safe because you vax'd them for some diseases is not a 100% safegaurd they will not still get the disease.

I like this Doctor and his book is really great.
http://www.holisticat.com/vaccinations.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
It wasn't a perfect trip to the vet. You probably weren't in the best mood, you had the kids with you, you were probably hoping for a quick visit and done. You aren't perfect and neither are they. I believe you can express to others what happened to you but don't bad mouth the office as a whole.
Leslie
Assumption on your part..

I was in a very good mood when I went..my kids and I love our kits and everyone was happy that day. They knew the babies were coming in to get a pinch and they were concerned for their fur brothers having to get a pinch.

I have never claimed to be perfect. I think I also mentioned this in another post.

Bad mouthing, call it what you want..I came here to get support from other's who love their cats and know one knows where I live or the name of the vet and clinic I go too. So no business is lost from my post.








Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
Perhaps the comment the vet tech made was to lighten the mood as you were apparently pretty po-ed.

My mom has bad veins, its hard to get blood from her--just think if for every time its taken 3,4, or 5 times to get her vein she would have changed doctors--it makes no sense.

Patience--give it a try
Leslie
Perhaps, but I do not appreciate her being so condescending and then turn around with a half smile and laugh about the whole situation at expense of my cat suffering due to her forced decision. It was not funny. It was a power trip for her.

I am sorry your Mother has bad veins. I have been a pin cushion myself for a few years on a monthly basis and I have always asked for a better nurse if I have had one that cannot get it right by the second time.
There is no doctor involved in blood retrieval, with the exception of telling your doctor, nurse so and so has a hard time and pokes you too much. You have bad veins and would like a nurse who is experienced in drawing blood so yo do not have to suffer every time. Or get a pic line or a port put in if you need it drawn so much.. The doctor is all about customer service.
I remember that tech or nurse. I tell my Doctor. I switch nurses/techs.

My Mother is also a phlebotomist and she tells me stories of other phleb's that can never hit a vein.

Compassion and acceptance give it a try....
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bunny View Post
Well, that may work for you, but I don't believe that the majority of pets are better without their owners when strangers poke and prod at them. My cat, Possum, comes to me for comfort and buries his head in the crook of my arm when we got to the vet's. I'd rather be there for him.
I agree, where most pets are concerned (ferals and untame or fear-aggressive individuals are a different matter of course). My vet prefers the human concerned to assist in the handling of the patient where at all possible and as long as the human is competent in doing so - last night at the vets I held Sonic for his examination and treatment, and if blood were to be drawn I would assist, and not only that, I would want to assist with holding my cat, and am competent to do so. Nate held Radar when he had to have stitches removed.

I don't know if it's because we do things differently here in the UK, but whenever I've been to the vet, it's expected that I will know how to safely handle, restrain, and calm whichever creature I have responsibility for during whatever examination and treatment is necessary. Anyone who doesn't know, is shown by the vet before the examination, I've never had a veterinary nurse/technician do it for me - in fact I've never been to the vet and even had anyone else in the room besides me, the patient, and the vet - and all treatment with the exception of surgical procedures under general anaesthetic is done on the table in front of you.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
I am surprised nobody picked this out. If you didn't get them tested and they got sick THEY would suffer the consequences.
ummmm... i think the 'them' she was referring to was the vet & techs, not the cats...
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
Actually, most pets are better without their owners, especially owners who are stressed and can't handle the procedure. Veterinary staff are generally calm, quick, and gentle, and the procedure is much more safe and stress-free in the back room.
I disagree. My animals have always been better when I'm with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
Testing for a highly prevalent disease that I have a high risk of exposure to?? YOU BET! What is there to disagree about? Wait until next month when I have more money... also been done before.

Docs know more than I do, I tend to listen to mine, as well as see him regularly.
I also disagree. I have a very good friend (a nurse) whose baby was in the hospital. The nurse attending her baby was about to give the baby an injection. My friend stopped her and asked her what it was and how much. When the nurse told my friend the answers, my friend told her she was not to give the medication to her child because it was too much and would kill the child. The nurse argued with her and my friend made her to call the doctor about the dosage. Turns out the doctor made a mistake in the amount and if the nurse had administered the injection, the baby WOULD have died. The only thing that saved this baby was that it's mother was a better nurse than the one looking after her baby. So, no, don't just blindly trust anyone because they are human and fallible too. This is not a "story" I heard - this is true and happened to my friend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bunny View Post
Well, that may work for you, but I don't believe that the majority of pets are better without their owners when strangers poke and prod at them. My cat, Possum, comes to me for comfort and buries his head in the crook of my arm when we got to the vet's. I'd rather be there for him.

Tricia
Bijou does that too. The vet can do anything to him as long as mommy is holding him.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
I agree, where most pets are concerned (ferals and untame or fear-aggressive individuals are a different matter of course). My vet prefers the human concerned to assist in the handling of the patient where at all possible and as long as the human is competent in doing so - last night at the vets I held Sonic for his examination and treatment, and if blood were to be drawn I would assist, and not only that, I would want to assist with holding my cat, and am competent to do so. Nate held Radar when he had to have stitches removed.

I don't know if it's because we do things differently here in the UK, but whenever I've been to the vet, it's expected that I will know how to safely handle, restrain, and calm whichever creature I have responsibility for during whatever examination and treatment is necessary. Anyone who doesn't know, is shown by the vet before the examination, I've never had a veterinary nurse/technician do it for me - in fact I've never been to the vet and even had anyone else in the room besides me, the patient, and the vet - and all treatment with the exception of surgical procedures under general anaesthetic is done on the table in front of you.
That is also how any vet I've ever consulted here in Canada works as well. I've never actually had to deal with a vet tech personally in all my time visiting vets. I'm assuming most vets here have them, but they work behind the scenes and don't interact directly with the owners. Only me, my kitty and the vet are in the exam room.
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
I agree, where most pets are concerned (ferals and untame or fear-aggressive individuals are a different matter of course). My vet prefers the human concerned to assist in the handling of the patient where at all possible and as long as the human is competent in doing so - last night at the vets I held Sonic for his examination and treatment, and if blood were to be drawn I would assist, and not only that, I would want to assist with holding my cat, and am competent to do so. Nate held Radar when he had to have stitches removed.

I don't know if it's because we do things differently here in the UK, but whenever I've been to the vet, it's expected that I will know how to safely handle, restrain, and calm whichever creature I have responsibility for during whatever examination and treatment is necessary. Anyone who doesn't know, is shown by the vet before the examination, I've never had a veterinary nurse/technician do it for me - in fact I've never been to the vet and even had anyone else in the room besides me, the patient, and the vet - and all treatment with the exception of surgical procedures under general anaesthetic is done on the table in front of you.
This has usually been my experience in the US, as well, although sometimes, the vet techs do do certain things, but never anything like injections. They weigh them and gather general patient information. My cats have only ever had injections administered by the vets themselves. I am always in the room when any of this is going on, and I'm also the one restraining them when needed.

Tricia
post #39 of 41
I rarely have a vet nurse in teh room, the only times are with cats that my vet know need more than one person restraining them, and with euthanasia. Any other time, I am 'trusted' to do that by myself.
post #40 of 41
My vet had some trouble finding a vein with my rescued 6-week-old kitten... Luckily though the kitten did not get upset by this... Unfortunately, they ended up not being able to draw enough blood for the testing anyway (kitten was anemic, poor thing). They ended up giving us a supplement to help with the anemia and having us come back in a week to try again. The second visit, he was less anemic and it worked. Luckily everything tested negative. Since this kitten was a stray from probably feral mom and I have a senior cat in the house it was important to do FelV/FIV testing...
post #41 of 41
I dont think the vet tech has any right to tell you anything about your pet. They're not trained to do that, they are trained to take weights, records, and help somewhat but they dont need to be almighty and snotty or rude! If the cats got sick, Im sure you'd get them tested! But whats the testing gonna help now while they're healthy, they probably wouldn't do anything if they were possitive because the cats still in good health! I would be upset too. No vet tech can tell me whats best for MY cat. Ive known my cats forever, I know when there is something wrong and I bet you would too!
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