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Cloth vs disposable? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jane_vernon View Post
As if raising kids isn't difficult enough without having to worry so much just about the nappies you choose
Lol. Yeah - but raising kids is also about the choices you make. If you want to teach your child to be responsible and care about the environment, and the community they live in - really anything to do with their morals, ethics, values, beliefs, then you need to be a good example. Plus, I'm not really all that worried about it. It was just one of many decisions you make as a parent and I was interested to hear about other people's views.

If raising kids made simple, ethical decisions too inconvenient to consider, I wouldn't want to have kids. Having children shouldn't compromise what you believe in just because it might be challenging, or you might be tired. I imagine my experience of being a mother will be something that makes me want to strive to be a better person - more than anything else I've ever done will. At least, that's what many people with children have told me, and it rings true. If I let myself down on something like this, I wouldn't be being a better person. I wouldn't be being true to myself and the things I feel to be right - and I would be undermining my efforts to teach my child to do what is right, instead of what is easy. Sure, some people might think it's just nappies - but big things start with small decisions, and for me the environmental impact is an issue that is not to be ignored for my convenience.

I have never understood why, when presented with a viable, and more ethically sound alternative, people still choose against it. But again, that's just the way I am. And I have to say, I hope I will successfully raise my child to be that way as well. But they are born with their own personalities. All you can do is try to guide them to decisions that will work out best for them, and teach them to be thoughtful, considerate and socially conscious.
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Lol. Yeah - but raising kids is also about the choices you make. If you want to teach your child to be responsible and care about the environment, and the community they live in - really anything to do with their morals, ethics, values, beliefs, then you need to be a good example. Plus, I'm not really all that worried about it. It was just one of many decisions you make as a parent.

If raising kids made simple, ethical decisions too inconvenient to consider, I wouldn't want to have kids. Having children shouldn't compromise what you believe in just because it might be challenging, or you might be tired. I imagine my experience of being a mother will be something that makes me want to strive to be a better person - more than anything else I've ever done will. At least, that's what many people with children have told me, and it rings true. If I let myself down on something like this, I wouldn't be being a better person. I wouldn't be being true to myself.

I have never understood why, when presented with a viable, and more ethically sound alternative, people still choose against it. But again, that's just the way I am. And I have to say, I hope it's how I will raise my child.
Here... here....KitEKats4Eva! ! Well said..
you may want to check this site out..I love this non-profit org.
may appeal to you in light of your post...or I may be waay off
http://www.attachmentparenting.org/
post #33 of 53
I've heard of wool soakers. One of my friends used them. Natural y'know.

She never convinced me because they seemed too hot for L.A.
post #34 of 53
Cloth diapers do not guarantee there will not be a diaper rash - some kids have very sensitive skin and will get a rash anyway. But I do think the chemicals used to produce the diapers makes the rash worse/more frequent.

I used cloth diapers for all 3 of my kids. I was not too happy to find out that Mother's Day Out required disposable. It took several tries to find a disposable that worked for my oldest. It is safer, IMO, to use disaposables in a day care situation. We had an outbreak of shigellosis at one fo the local day cares - it would have been worse with cloth diapers sitting around.

And I loved having the old diapers as cleaning rags.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie=^..^= View Post
She never convinced me because they seemed too hot for L.A.
My sister used wool soakers at night and we live in Australia, he was fine all through the summer. Apparently wool is breathable, and maintains normal body temperature.
post #36 of 53
20 yrs ago (when my son was born) I had a "subscription" to a diaper service with cloth diapers. NO way would I use them on him after the initial week. I check and change often, yet he got a rash from the wet diaper next to his skin.

Sorry, but the disposible are more sanitary then cloth diapers!
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by jane_vernon View Post
I'd just like to point out that it is not the nappy that gives the rash but the stale urine and faeces on the skin.

If you leave either on long enough, you will get diaper rash.

Disposables have come a long way these days with drawing moisture away from the skin, helping to prevent diaper rash.

But that does not obviously change the environmental impact.
ITA w/Jane, on all counts.

I have used disposables on Dani since birth, and she has yet to get diaper rash (knock on wood) even when sleeping thru the night. However, I have started to investigate the possibility of CD'ing, and have purchased a few used ones thru a cloth diapering forum (diaper swappers --- google it!!!) Matter of fact, she's sleeping in one right now!

Now, I'm no tree-hugger by any stretch, but I figure if there's some way I can help out, even if I'm only using cloth part-time, with a minimal investment (hence the used CD's) I'll give it a shot.

Disposables cost me, on avg, $10/wk with no return on that investment, and a slightly increased bill for garbage pickup. Now if I buy 18 cloth diapers, averaging $12 used, it'll take me about 4 months to break even, but at the end of that 4 months, i'll still have 18 cloth diapers that I can turn around and sell to another environmentally conscious mama, and save a little money that way.

And to pp who said disposables get more expensive as they get bigger, that's not entirely accurate. The cost per diaper does increase, but as the child gets older you will change them less often, so the cost per unit time stays roughly the same. (I change Dani about 6 times/day, as opposed to 12/day as a newborn)

Now, if you really want to cut down on your baby's environmental impact, do some research into Elimination Communication, or EC for short. It's a natural parenting approach to toilet training your child very young, so they could possibly be out of diapers altogether (cloth or disposable) before they're a year old!! Dani's grandma says she did something similar to this with her two boys, and they were using the potty by the time they were 9 months old. Not sure I'm ready to go this route, as my daughter's in daycare and this technique requires a lot of time and dedication, but it's a great idea in theory!
post #38 of 53
Just thinking about the gazillions of disposable diapers in our landfills sickens me.

And Golden, don't all the chemicals next to your babies skin bother you? They have to be cancer causing and no one can convince me different.

We inhale chemicals, we eat chemicals on our food, we have chemicals next to our skin. Is it any wonder cancer is rampant?

I think most people use disposable because they are more convenient and we are all, inherently, lazy. We SAY we care about the environment but we only care when WE don't have to go out of our way. When it comes to actually doing something to help Mother Earth, most of us won't. Very sad. We have no one to blame for the state of things but ourselves. We like to blame it all on our governments but it is all of OUR faults.
post #39 of 53
Thread Starter 
I will definitely have a look at EC - sounds interesting. Not that I'll be forcing my child to do anything too young, but then, sometimes we take for granted certain ages our kids `should' be doing things - if this seems viable then why not?

I have to laugh when you say `tree-hugger'. I used to find that SO offensive (i.e. - you can't care for your environment and be conscious without being some clapped-out hippie?) - but now I just laugh. If I'm a tree-hugger then yeah, so be it, and I'm proud of it. At least when I'm on my deathbed I will be able to rest peacefully knowing that I didn't spend my entire life thinking about myself and my needs only, and that I tried in every way not to bite the hand that fed me.

But really, I guess it's up to the individual. If you aren't really fussed about chemicals all over your baby's skin, don't care about landfill, aren't bothered by the products that go into disposables, the fact that their production uses more than double the amount of water and chemicals than cleaning cloth nappies uses, if you know there's viable and real alternatives but you're not really interested, then I say lucky you. I wish I could be that way sometimes - because, yeah, it would make life a bit easier. But I guess what it comes down to is your own conscience. If you can ignore it, or don't really have one when it comes to the environment, then I suppose there is no argument about choice.

I have always just been raised to believe, and really strongly do believe, you can do the right thing, or the easy one. If I always chose the easy path I would feel uncomfortable with myself every day, and because I want my child to grow up aware and considerate and conscious, then what sort of an example would I be if I couldn't even be bothered to do the right thing when it is a baby? If I fell down on the easy choices, I wouldn't even trust myself to make the hard ones.
post #40 of 53
Well when he was wearing diapers, I never had a problem with chemicals or rashes. But the cloth caused them - maybe it was whatever the company washed them in, but I had better luck with the disposible ones. Not sure which "chemicals" you are talking about that would be on his skin.
post #41 of 53
Thread Starter 
Well, some of these ones for a start:

Quote:
Research undertaken in 1999 suggests that chemicals released by disposable nappies could cause or aggravate asthma. Nappies were tested as soon as they were taken from the packet for their level of emissions, which were high enough to produce asthma like symptoms. The chemicals released were Tolune, xylene, ethylbenzene, styrene and isopropylbenzene amongst others. These chemicals are by products of the manufacturing process of disposable nappies that contain gel.
The whole article can be found here.

Here is a link to an article about disposable nappies and nappy rash. According to this, nappy rash began to be a problem at around the time disposable nappies were first invented.

And I didn't know this - the super-absorbent chemical in disposable nappies is lethal to cats if inhaled. Reason number 20 not to use them.
post #42 of 53
That whole landfill thing really freaks me out. Mountains and mountains of dirty diapers that will just sit there for centuries.

Tricia
post #43 of 53
we CD about 75% of the time. we use fuzzi bunz CDs and do wash them ourselves. generally speaking, babies who wear CDs get LESS diaper rash b/c the fabric actually breathes. When we do use disposables, we but pampers, ans even w/moisture lockor whatever it's called, jude still gets a rash when he wears them.

i don't know how CDs are less sanitary than disposables. Someone will have to explain that to me.

as for the smell of the dirty diapers...i've found that with my exclusively breast fed baby, the smell isn't at all offensive.

we use a eco-friendly soap called Ecover and tea tree oil to wash our CDs. They always come out nice and white.

that's my take on the subject. i HIGHLY reccomend fuzzi bunz. Sarah... pm me if you want some links to online CD stores. also, check out the forumss at mothering.com. yhe people over there are WONDERFUL.

excuse the typos... i'm nak (nursing at keyboard).
post #44 of 53
Thread Starter 
NAK?

That's brilliant.
post #45 of 53
one of the many new acronyms i'velearned since becoming a mother. (=
post #46 of 53
I'm lazy..... I used disposable with both my boys

But if you knew my kids, you wouldn't want thier diapers lingering in the house either
post #47 of 53
Elimination Communication:
http://www.natural-wisdom.com/

Wool Soaker info:
http://www.wildflowerdiapers.com/pages/woolinfo.php

Disposable Chemical Article from trustworthy site:
http://www.mothering.com/articles/ne...er-asthma.html

THE forum for parenting and has a GREAT diapering forum:
http://www.mothering.com/discussions/
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
dont use them ?
I'm a bit late responding to this post, but I wanted to say that there *are* people who practice what is known as "elimination communication" which is a diaper/nappy free way of taking care of your baby's eliminations.

I don't plan on doing it, personally. We're going to start off with 'sposies until I'm able to get a sewing machine and make some fluff. I prefer the fluff anyway on a personal level and for a variety of reasons. It's more work, but the environment aside, it's better for the baby, including the fact that they are less inclined towards diaper rashes and things like that. Plus it just plain looks cute!
post #49 of 53
Thread Starter 
Oooooh nine days to go!! How exciting!!
post #50 of 53
OMG! Single digits? When did *that* happen! Excuse me while I pass out LOL

Knowing my luck I'll probably go over But I'm excited anyway! Any time now!
post #51 of 53
I assisted both a close friend and my daughter with research. Unless you do the laundry by hand, well, then you aren't doing the environment any favors - electricity is the worst enemy of all for the environment, not to mention the bleach, etc.
When I had my girls, I did use cloth and used the sun to bleach them. And yes, I washed them by hand, because the first time I didn't have a washer nor a car to drive to a laundromat, and the 2nd time, I lived in a mining camp, out in the Sierra, and again, there was no laundry facilities. But with my grandson, I bought him the disposables.
post #52 of 53
Thread Starter 
Of course you aren't doing the environment any favours when you do the laundry! I don't dispute that - however, the statistics on cloth vs disposable nappies taking all of that into consideration still put disposables FAR ahead of cloth in the environmental damage stakes. On all counts - chemicals, water use, landfill, everything. Much worse than cloth - and you have to use something. I think it's better to opt for the lesser of two evils.

And also I never realised how many chemicals were in the nappies themselves. Even if not for the environmental consideration, I still wouldn't use them because of that.

Having said that, I intend to have a ready supply of organic disposable nappies. Pretty much the same price but no chemicals and 100% biodegradable. Lovely!
post #53 of 53
Additionally, you're NOT supposed to use bleach on cloth diapers. It breaks down the fibers and causes the diapers to not last as long.

I've found that using our (eco-friendly) detergent and tea tree oil gets them plenty white. We also hang ours to dry (though not outside... it's cold in PA!).
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