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New Cat

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have had my new cat for 10 days and he has been kept inside. He is about 18 months old. Is it ok to let him out now?
post #2 of 10
Why do you want to let him outside so bad?

I can't imagine letting my baby outside on his own--he will be harness trained so I can take him out but will never go out alone. Couldn't deal with coming home and finding him hit in the road.

Leslie
post #3 of 10
I know that having an outdoor cat is more common in the UK than in the US, but there really is no reason to let them out. They are much safer inside. Also, you are in London? I used to live there, there's no way I would let a cat outside! It's too busy.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post
Why do you want to let him outside so bad?

I can't imagine letting my baby outside on his own--he will be harness trained so I can take him out but will never go out alone. Couldn't deal with coming home and finding him hit in the road.

Leslie
I'm letting him out because he wants to get out. He was used to going out all the time and I think its cruel to keep them. He lunges himself at the door everytime I open it plus his litter tray stinks Anyway, I've just opened my back door and he stayed outside in the garden under the porch watching the squirrels for about 5 mins, and now he is back in again as its cold and raining
post #5 of 10
Both my cats are indoors because I don't want anything to happen to them but I can understand why you want to let yours out, I see other cats playing in the trees in my front garden and wish I felt it were safe enough for mine to join them. Over here most of the animal charities say that cats need to come and go as they please, even the RSPCA website says that cats need to go outside: RSPCA cat info. I know a lot of cats can be outdoors and live to an old age, it comes down to luck.

I hope your cat enjoys his time outdoors and stays safe.
post #6 of 10
Even if you want him to be an indoor/outdoor cat, it's best to keep him indoors for more than 10 days before allowing him outdoors. A few weeks is usually recommended (not going by personal experience here as my cats are indoor cats). Before you let him out, make sure he responds to his name or to something like the sound of a box of biscuits being shaken as that will make it easier for you to call him in. The first time you let him out supervise him and it's best to do it before a meal so that he's hungry and not likely to wander far.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your replies. At the moment he just seems more interested in sleeping! This evening I opened the back door to go into the garden but he did not attempt to go out He has just found a new cosy spot to curl up in.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack31 View Post

he will be harness trained

Leslie
Whats all that about?? How weird
post #9 of 10
Please remember that one of the cultural differences experienced on this board is the decision on whether or not your cat should be an indoor/outdoor cat. We need to realize that everyone's situation is different and that we are all here because we care about our cats and want what is best for them.

People outside of the US often have a hard time time understanding how varied the ecosystems are here - mountain ranges, desert, plains, beaches, farm & ranch lands, valleys, various climates. Cities, towns, wilderness, and farm/ranch land.

I live in a Dallas suburb, across from a large park connected to other areas by trails. We have squirrels, possums, ducks, geese, rabbits, snakes including copperheads & water moccasins, foxes, even a cougar has been spotted in our park by the local Outdoor Learning School staff. And many of these critters have visited my house! Fleas and ticks are a constant issue for us. It is not safe for our cats to be outside.

Some people try to balance the need to protect their cats with the cat's desire to go outside by using a harness and leash during their time outside. It does look strange the first time you see a cat in harness & leash, but some cats love it.
post #10 of 10
It's generally considered to be a matter of three weeks for a cat's internal compass to be reset. Before that, I'd keep a close eye on him.
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