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Morbidly Obese Dog :(

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I was in the Vet's office last week and wanted to cry. A lady came out of one of the rooms with her dog. It was the fattest dog I had ever seen in person. It's LEGS had fat rolls. I just couldn't believe what that poor dog looked like. His belly touched the ground and he could hardly walk.

How does a person let their animal get SOOOOOOO fat?!!? It's not like it just happened overnight. I just don't understand. Of course the woman herself could stand to loose a few lbs so maybe she thought it was ok for her dog to look like that. Sorry if I offend anyone, I could stand a to loose a few lbs too, but why would she think that was ok for her dog to suffer!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

PS. the dog was at the vet for knee surgery, no doubt because of all the weight being put on them.
post #2 of 27
Sometimes the person takes in the animal which is already that fat. I know a lady here who has a dog in similar condition. Shall I say had. The dog is gone as of Friday AM because of being mordibly obese.
post #3 of 27
I often wonder about people, too.. I work at a dog groomer, and so I know most of these dogs have been with the same person quite awhile.. and I have to just watch some of them come in fatter and fatter every time. There's one Cocker Spaniel I could barely pick up to get into the tub this last visit. The poor guy can barely stand up anymore, I feel bad making him stand to wash his belly.
post #4 of 27
It is really sad. You would think if they loved their pets so much, they would want them to live long healthy lives. Being so fat leads to dying at an earlier age, not to mention health problems. So sad. WHY can't people see this? It is not good for the animal and the animal is the one to suffer. It is really mean.
post #5 of 27
That's so sad

I really think its just the lack of education in people. When someone who doesn't understand obesity in animals sees that their dog wants more food, they just assume they're still hungry.

What they don't understand is that the dog isn't still hungry. People need to stop being so "nice" and just learn to say "no".
post #6 of 27
YOU really dont know... it could be disease , that is my dogs case ... she has cushings and a pot belly but the rest of her is perfectly proportioned , it was one of the symptoms that got her tested... so just cause an animal is WHAT you see as overwt( which yeah the belly on the ground is ) may just be a dog with a thyroid or other adrenal gland disease not neglect or overfeeding
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
YOU really dont know... it could be disease , that is my dogs case ... she has cushings and a pot belly but the rest of her is perfectly proportioned , it was one of the symptoms that got her tested... so just cause an animal is WHAT you see as overwt( which yeah the belly on the ground is ) may just be a dog with a thyroid or other adrenal gland disease not neglect or overfeeding
But what about the fat rolls on the LEGS, that's what really made me sad.
Also the bet techs didn't support the owner after she walked out the door. They just sheepishly looked around when the waiting room people started talking about how fat the dog was and how sad they were for the poor thing.
post #8 of 27
I have seen that with thyroid issues..The fact the dog went to the vet means the owners cared and hopefully the vet would find out the cause
post #9 of 27
It always makes me so sad to see obese animals.
My dog is only chubby, but it is due to his lack of activity, not his food intake.
He has only ever gotten a measured ammount of high quality dry food a day, substituted with high quality canned food twice a week.

The problem though, is that his activity level dropped dramatically after he pulled a groin muscle a bit over a year ago.

So keep that in mind, a dog may be fat due to orthopedic issues or disease, not always from over feeding.
post #10 of 27
I think most of the time fat animals ARE from overfeeding. I see a lot of fat animals all the time who do not have any conditions. There was even a show on Animal Planet about fat dogs. There was a rottweiler on there who was hugely obese from overfeeding and when people tried to tell the owner her dog was fat, she got all offended. There was also a lady on there with a terrier dog who fed it four peice of cake because she "couldn't say no".
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet72947 View Post
I think most of the time fat animals ARE from overfeeding. I see a lot of fat animals all the time who do not have any conditions. There was even a show on Animal Planet about fat dogs. There was a rottweiler on there who was hugely obese from overfeeding and when people tried to tell the owner her dog was fat, she got all offended. There was also a lady on there with a terrier dog who fed it four peice of cake because she "couldn't say no".
Oh I agree with you, I think most are fat from over eating, my point though is that unless you actually know the whole story, you should not just assume that that is the case.
post #12 of 27
With humans, it's hard to stay slim if you've got the wrong set of genetics for it... but a human can easily restrict an animal to a healthy size, given proper food and exercise. I understand an animal that's moderately overweight--maybe the equivalent of a 200 lb woman--because some animals have bad genetics, too; and some really love to eat and hate to exercise. But an animal that's so obese that its health is endangered and its bones and joints are suffering... that's a sign of an owner who doesn't understand that giving the animal what it wants is less important than giving the animal what it needs.

Maybe it's just a part of the bigger problem... a lot of people don't think past immediate pleasure, or don't have the self-control to put it into practice; so they don't think past it for their animals, either. It's a skill you can learn, I'm sure of it--but if you don't learn it in childhood, and nothing happens to open your eyes, then it's likely you won't even know the importance.
post #13 of 27
i have seen a mobidly obese doberman when i was younger... the poor thing couldnt even climb into its owners car and it was very very sad. My boyfriends dog is overweight for his breed, he weighs 110 lbs which doesnt really sound over weight, but when comparing him to healthy Labradors, you can definately tell that something isnt right with his weight. his problem is over eating. he gets 2-3 big cans of food a day, plus whatever he can beg from people while theyre eating. its so annoying that you can even eat in my house with out him drooling all over you and barking for your food. the problem is no one can say no to him, he was never taught not to beg. most people in my home try not to give him anything, but wind up giving him what he wants so he will leave them alone but what they dont understand is they are contributing to the problem and that he will only start up again once he has finished the scraps they had already given him. i however, dont usually eat around him and he learned years ago that its no use begging from me because i will not share with him. i refuse to contribute to his early demise. and i try to make my bfs parents understand what they are doing to him but they keep doing it because "he is old and trying to change him isnt going to work" but he may live a little longer if they would just say no.
post #14 of 27
My sister has a morbidly obese dog and there is no medical reason behind his condition. I've done everything in my power to educate my sister on her behavior towards the dog (he gets treats all day long and multiple meals of bad food), but it doesn't sink in with her. There is a part of me that wants to slap her and the other part tells me to continue to educate her. She also rationalizes her behavior as "he's old and its too hard to change him now". I don't get it. My sister is a smart person.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet72947 View Post
I think most of the time fat animals ARE from overfeeding. I see a lot of fat animals all the time who do not have any conditions. There was even a show on Animal Planet about fat dogs. There was a rottweiler on there who was hugely obese from overfeeding and when people tried to tell the owner her dog was fat, she got all offended.
What got me was that they said that the owner was a retired nurse. A nurse of all people should know better!
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zane's Pal View Post
What got me was that they said that the owner was a retired nurse. A nurse of all people should know better!
lol... should and do are very different .. the most obese lady I have ever known ( no medical issues) was a DIETICIAN!!!!!!!!!!!
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
lol... should and do are very different .. the most obese lady I have ever known ( no medical issues) was a DIETICIAN!!!!!!!!!!!
Oh my goodness! I hope you are kidding!
post #18 of 27
I think that's a good thing, actually. I mean, think about it--there are so many fat people out there who are scared to go to doctors because the doctors will just lecture them about losing weight; so they don't get the information they need to be healthy, whether they are fat or not. Many die because they won't go to doctors.

It's possible to be fat and healthy at the same time--and easier than slimming down. Sometimes losing weight isn't even smart if you don't better your health first; it puts a lot of strain on your body because it is essentially starvation. Your overweight dietician is probably in a better position to advise similarly overweight clients--she can teach them how to eat properly, and to be healthy even if it is very hard for them to lose weight. Remember that only 10% of diets are successful in weight loss; and only 1%, successful for 5 years or more. That means that focusing on healthy diets and increasing the activity level is a more sensible option for most obese people than trying to lose weight.
post #19 of 27
I have a fat dog. I acquired him fat. It took A LOT for me to get Jim on the program of helping me get him lean. He would also get offended if anyone said anything about his weight. I finally had to show him things in writing to convince him how unhealthy it was. We are now on our way to a healthy weight. I cant wait to see him skinny and healthy one day
post #20 of 27
Skinny AND healthy, remember going too fast with weight loss is dangerous--though you sound like you're doing just fine!

I'm keeping my two cats on carefully regulated amounts of food--I don't want them to get fat, since it's literal torture to be on a diet. I should know; I tried a thousand diets before I just decided to focus on health. Ever since then, my blood pressure went down to normal, my resting heart rate is in the low 60s (which means I'm in good shape), and I can do anything a skinny person can at my physically active job... a 200 lb woman can be quite healthy and I'm living proof. This would be a good suggestion for the fat cats who just can't seem to lose weight, too--if you can get them to play and you can feed them a good diet, then they're likely to be healthy despite the extra weight.
post #21 of 27
Callista, you are a refreshing voice of reason, thank you
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Callista View Post

I'm keeping my two cats on carefully regulated amounts of food--I don't want them to get fat, since it's literal torture to be on a diet. I should know; I tried a thousand diets before I just decided to focus on health. Ever since then, my blood pressure went down to normal, my resting heart rate is in the low 60s (which means I'm in good shape), and I can do anything a skinny person can at my physically active job... a 200 lb woman can be quite healthy and I'm living proof. This would be a good suggestion for the fat cats who just can't seem to lose weight, too--if you can get them to play and you can feed them a good diet, then they're likely to be healthy despite the extra weight.
I have to disagree with that. Being overweight is never healthy. Perhaps it may seem that way now, but the added weight will definetely catch up, and cause problems later on. Increased pressure on the joints from the extra weight that always has to be carried around, heart problems and blockages...there are hundreds of things that can go wrong, the risks just keep multiplying as the weight adds up.
post #23 of 27
NOTE at times being FIT and Overwt is fine, yes there are studies saying being overwt can help but they are talking about a 100 lb person being 115 lb s not 250 lbs ... being OBESE is never good as it DOES contribute to early death from things like diabetes , heart disease
post #24 of 27
Sadly obesity in animals is something I see EVERYDAY. No one wants to admit that their animal is fat because of them. There MUST be something wrong with him/her... So we do the thyroid tests... guess what... the animal is just fat.

They get told all about putting their pets on diets and bringing them in for weight checks... Then they bring them back in for a weight check to see if the diet is working. The pet has gained weight. "well I thought since it was a diet food they could eat as much of it as they wanted" OR "OH you mean that their not allowed to have the 20 treats I normally give them a day?"

The worst case I saw was a young calico cat. She was only about 3 years old and had to be put to sleep due to her obesity. She weighed 35 pounds. She could hardly breath. She couldn't stand or even turn her head. Putting her on a diet would have caused her to get hepatic lipidosis and would have killed her if she didn't pass from respiratory distress first. Their was no medical reason the cat should have been that big. It killed me to see her get put down because of her owner.

Some people just don't get it. They think its cute to have a fat animal. Or they think that giving the animal food is how they show they love it. They dont realize that one day that animal while get heart problems, or diabetes, or horrible arthritis because of its weight.
post #25 of 27
Don't judge the owner without knowing the circumstances. My former boss had a dog named Mallory. She was the sweetest golden retriever mix I had ever met, and the fatest. She had a more active life than I did...she swam in the ocean, she rode on the boat every day, she came into the office with my boss to get lovings. She was overweight because of a thyroid condition (she was on a special diet, and she didn't get any treats), and my boss spent thousands of dollars in medicine and tests to try to get her better. Unfortunately she did die a few years ago because of heart failure, which had NOTHING to do with her owners. They did everything they could.

I think the fact that the owner was bringing her dog in to the vet says a lot.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaireBear View Post
I have to disagree with that. Being overweight is never healthy. Perhaps it may seem that way now, but the added weight will definetely catch up, and cause problems later on. Increased pressure on the joints from the extra weight that always has to be carried around, heart problems and blockages...there are hundreds of things that can go wrong, the risks just keep multiplying as the weight adds up.
It's healthier than going on a diet, regaining the weight, and then going on another diet. The yo-yo diet syndrome has been associated with many more problems than mere obesity, and (may I remind you) 99% of diets will result in either failure or exactly this problem.

However, it's been proven that, among the group of overweight people with normal blood pressure who are in good shape, life expectancy is equal to that of a normal-weight person with the same fitness--and actually higher than that of an underweight person.

Mind you, it's not as though I can sit on my laurels and congratulate myself that being fat won't hurt me. I exercise half an hour daily, ride my bike everywhere within ten miles, eat healthy food, and hold an active, physical job.

For the past fifty years, doctors have thought that being overweight is bad--but it isn't. It's the associated lack of fitness that really hurts you. The human body is designed to grab hold of the weight and keep it there, since natural selection for thousands upon thousands of years rejected those whose bodies couldn't do this. For that reason, most diets simply don't work--meaning that a more realistic goal for most fat people is simple fitness and health rather than thinness.

We're just waiting for social prejudice to catch up with this truth.
post #27 of 27
Jut getting out and moving really is the key. Society doesn't punish those thin people who are in terrible health but maintain a size 2 dress size. As long as they look good, all is forgiven.

Whether we are fat or thin, we simply need to move. I am "obese" and much healthier (although not anywhere near healthy enough) than many thin people I know. Thin people also have high rates of diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, etc. We don't hear so much about them.

When we yo-yo diet, we run the risk of putting on all the weight we've lost, plus more. Fat cells do not go away. It is much healthier to be active and to love ourselves at the size we are instead of hating our bodies and putting them into starvation mode to attain some grand socially-accepted ideal. I am halfway there - I won't diet but the loving myself thing hasn't quite happened yet

Yo-yo dieting is a killer. Talk about stress on the body and mental health. I have old friends who have yo-yoed for years. From a reasonable size 14 in their teens to 200+ down to 150 and back up over 300. Every time they lose weight, they are told how wonderful they are - of course when they gain it back, they believe they are once more an unworthy fat person.

I am fat and my cats are not. Just because a woman has extra poundage doesn't mean she is an irresponsible pet owner. She could be, but it isn't because she is fat.

I do feel for the dog. Left to its own resources, it would naturally exercise often every day and most likely maintain a healthy (not scrawny) weight, barring a medical condition.
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