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Pre-anaesthetic tests

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Oscar and Smudge are in for their castration today and my boyfriend just called to let me know he's taken them in etc. He also said that he's opted for them to have the pre-anaesthetic tests (at £40 each!!). I was just wondering why they do pre-anaesthetic tests? Obviously anything that makes the procedure safer is a definite plus - it just seems extremely expensive!

Fingers crossed for my little boys today please, I'm going to be worrying until they contact us between 2pm-4pm.
post #2 of 13
The preanesthetic tests check for the general health of various organ systems--it would show if there are kidney or liver issues, for example, or anemia. The vets can then adjust the type of anesthesia and pain medicine given if needed or suggest that surgery be postponed until any underlying illness is resolved or lessened. £40 sounds a bit high but the blood tests the vet is doing may be more comprehensive. My vet typically checks a CBC, liver and kidney values for preanesthetic screens. Since my only cats who have been through surgery with me were also seniors, I usually opted for a more comprehensive set of blood work that also checks other chemistries, like potassium and phosphorus (as well as more than a dozen other things). The blood work can also serve as a basis for comparison for the future. When I adopted Zek, I had a junior wellness profile done (basically a senior panel minus the thyroid test), just to make sure he didn't have any abnormalities to watch for and so that we have something to compare against in the future. That full profile was about $100.
post #3 of 13
I don't know how £40 converts, but my vet charges $45 for the pre test. And I wouldn't consider putting them under without paying it.
post #4 of 13
Pre-op blood work is a great idea. My vet discovered Cleo had renal failure when she did her pre-spay blood work at 6 months old. With proper treatment, Cleo is 7 1/2 years old....7 years with CRF.....which is really pretty amazing. My vet said she probably wouldn't have made it to 5 years, if we hadn't found it so early. By doing the pre-op blood work, we were able to diagnose the problem, and use especially kidney safe anesthesia for her spay surgery. To look at Cleo today, you'd never know she has a chronic and eventually fatal condition. She's fat, sassy, playful and 'healthy'!
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Aww, well I'm so glad you caught it early, it must have been the best investment you've made.

The kitties bloodwork came back fine - and they've pretty much recovered already!

I posted this on my other thread but just thought I'd ask here also.. Oscars pupils are dilated now (woke up from op 4 hours ago but I've only seen them in the past 30 minutes), is there any particularily reason for this?

*edit* I tried using a torch near him to see if he'd look into it to see the reaction of his pupils and they undilate a little but I'm convinced that they normally look smaller.
post #6 of 13
Would you give your boyfriend a hug for me - I just love a guy who'll spend the extra money to make extra-sure things go as well as possible!

I can relate - I took my five year old male, Dante, in last week as the vet had recommended I think about having his teeth cleaned after his check-up last month (he had some tartar building up).

When the vet tech starting going through the various options, she actually started laughing as I was insisting on just the best for my boy! I had the CBC done in addition to the normal panel, and kept saying I wanted the more expensive panel (the prices were on the check list) - she kindly pointed out Dante wasn't quite ready for the senior panel.

Basically, the tests were to make sure he was in good health before the procedure started (no liver problems, diabetes, high white cell counts, etc.), and also serve as a baseline for Dante for the future.

My entire bill was about $188 for the anesthetic, teeth cleaning, lab work, and, well, anal gland expression while we were at it. Sure, I haven't gotten those new shoes I wanted, but my baby has clean teeth!

I hope your babies are making a rapid recovery - I know you'll be nervous til they're back to their old selves!
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katteh View Post
I posted this on my other thread but just thought I'd ask here also.. Oscars pupils are dilated now (woke up from op 4 hours ago but I've only seen them in the past 30 minutes), is there any particularily reason for this?
When Swanie has his teeth cleaned, his eyes were totally dialated the whole night, just started to go down the next day. Totally freaked me out. The vet said it was the type of anesthetic they used because they use something to inhibit saliva when they do dentals. I don't know if it would be the same reason in your case, but it wouldn't hurt to give your vet a call and put your mind at ease (or catch a problem if it is one).
post #8 of 13
The 1st I heard of it was for Sooty's 2nd op. They said it was to see if the stuff they used were tolerated by the dog. I said no, use what they used a couple of years b4 when she was spayed. When Blossom went in I said no again & everything was fine. 40 poind equates to $120 Aus.
post #9 of 13
I really can't see doing that labwork for a young, healthy male cat's castration. They're only under fairly lightly and briefly. I know I was asked that, too, and I declined.

On the other hand, if you want a baseline, I suppose that's as good a time as any to do it.

Upshot: six and half a dozen.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
I really can't see doing that labwork for a young, healthy male cat's castration. They're only under fairly lightly and briefly. I know I was asked that, too, and I declined.

On the other hand, if you want a baseline, I suppose that's as good a time as any to do it.

Upshot: six and half a dozen.
I am of this school.... thou you may catch something rare most young ones are healthy....
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Well I suppose we now know that both cats are healthy!

As for the dilated pupils, they've actually gone right down now so I think it must have been the anaesthetic. I was expecting to have to beg for forgiveness from them, but they won't leave me and my boyfriend alone!! Are following us around the house and purring nonstop, it's very cute.

I have to say, when we got the cats, I never thought it would be this expensive.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katteh View Post
I have to say, when we got the cats, I never thought it would be this expensive.
I've found that when shelters give prospective adoptees advice on the cost of keeping a cat that their estimates are way too low. I told this to my local Humane Society after I adopted my first two cats there. Next year I noticed they had increased it, but still not high enough.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Well my family had cats for the majority of my life, but I guess I never really thought about the cost. The fact that Oscar was ill when we first got him meant that it cost an extra 200 pounds, then another 200 yesterday.. 400 in less than 3 months.

Either way, they're well worth the money.
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