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Types of Brushes?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
We'd gotten Reagan's shedding problem under control. That being the case, with Whisper not needing to be brushed (short-haired and *very* well self-groomed), we haven't been needing to look into a new brush/comb for the cats, though I'd still like to get something for Reagan.

For short-haired cats, what do you think about those grooming gloves? Do they pick up much of the hair on a short-hair? In case Reagan starts up again in the spring when the weather is warmer, I'd like to have a solution. The change in food helped (I think it might have been an allergy) but when she sheds, she sheds *copiously* and I really think that the warmer weather is going to cause at least some shedding (though we have months for that!).

What about a curry comb?

As for Molly, she's long-haired. I've not had a whole lot of luck with brushes for long-haired cats, other than the slicker brushes, and I think that introducing her to a slicker brush right off the bat could spell disaster. She'll also need to be combed around her back end and her haunches, I'm sure. Should we go with a fine-toothed comb, or not?

What do you think about the slickers? Good idea or not? I feel as though they probably feel scratchy to the cat
post #2 of 17
I use the FURminator on my DSH. That thing can remove a lot of fur.
post #3 of 17
I use a slicker brush on all of my kitties (both short and long haired), and have had great results. I'm hoping to get a Furminator soon though, I've heard wonderful things about them.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Yikes! Looks perfect, but what's the average cost of one of these?

Also, the video at Petsmart.com shows a short-haired cat being groomed. Would it be the same with a long-haired cat?
post #5 of 17
You can get one for <$20 shipped on eBay.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MechanicalMan View Post
You can get one for <$20 shipped on eBay.
Really? I'm all over that then! I'll have to talk to DH first and we would want to wait until after the baby is born so that we've covered any unexpected health expenses for me, the baby and of course anything Molly throws at us but then we can look into getting one. That's not too bad a price if it really works and doesn't fall apart like a few brushes we've had!
post #7 of 17
I also recommend the FurMinator for both short hair and long hair cats. But if you can't get one right now then a fine and medium tooth pet comb will work. YOu're right, slicker brushes can tend to irritate some cats skin. I use one occassionally just to fluff but I don't use it down to the skin.
post #8 of 17
Another FURminator user here, I have two DLHs, one DMH and two DSHs and I use the medium sized FURminator on all of them.

I would recommend spending the extra few $$ on getting the medium sized yellow one over the cat one which (at least in my experience) doesn't work as well and with its small size it takes too long to properly brush them and they either get play aggressive type attitudes or just fed up by the time I was done.
post #9 of 17
I use the Zoom Groom. It's the only brush Stimpy lets me use on him.
post #10 of 17
I like the normal fine-toothed flea combs and a medium width comb. I don't use any kind of brush on cats. Brushes don't do anything for a longhair, and not much for a shorthair.

IMO combs should be pretty much the only grooming tool you really need for either long or short hair cats
post #11 of 17
I use the Furminator on the dog and the cat, they both like it.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Furminator has the advantage of working for the dog, too. Although he doesn't shed much, it's better for his skin than frequent bathing, as he already has dry skin (food allergy, we've changed the food -- DH messed up and bought the wrong food for both the cats *and* the dog, and we've been fighting skin issues because of it *grrr*).

A fine toothed comb probably isn't going to do a whole lot for Reagan's fur, because her fur is so fine, but it would still be great for Molly, once I can get her out and about and socializing properly.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghosthunterbeck View Post
Furminator has the advantage of working for the dog, too. Although he doesn't shed much, it's better for his skin than frequent bathing, as he already has dry skin (food allergy, we've changed the food -- DH messed up and bought the wrong food for both the cats *and* the dog, and we've been fighting skin issues because of it *grrr*).

A fine toothed comb probably isn't going to do a whole lot for Reagan's fur, because her fur is so fine, but it would still be great for Molly, once I can get her out and about and socializing properly.
A fine toothed comb may be just what your kitty with fine hair needs!
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzjazz2u View Post
A fine toothed comb may be just what your kitty with fine hair needs!
It slips right through, unfortunately. No matter how fine, it just doesn't really catch the hair in this case. I've used them with other fine-haired cats as well and it just doesn't take care of the shedding problem in the *least*. It would be great for Whisper (for sure) and probably for Molly as well, but for Reagan I need something that "catches" the hair.

A fine toothed *plastic* comb might do that, but I don't feel like spending that much money on something that is likely to break down as quickly as plastic often does
post #15 of 17
Have you tried a Zoom Groom? They aren't that expensive, and if you get it at a big box store you can return it. It catches the hair pretty well. My cats don't like the slicker brushes. I think the slicker part pokes their skin and hurts.

PS-I bought a brush my sister swore by, from Petsmart, and it didn't get anything off of my cats. I just kept the packaging & receipt, and returned it. It cost a lot more than the zoom groom too.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
I like the normal fine-toothed flea combs and a medium width comb. I don't use any kind of brush on cats. Brushes don't do anything for a longhair, and not much for a shorthair.

IMO combs should be pretty much the only grooming tool you really need for either long or short hair cats

I agree with this...however, if you are interested in showing, you will, in the end, need to invest in some good quality brushes such as these:

http://mjmcompany.com/1allsystems-pinbrush.htm

I have the 27mm fusion (2nd pic on the screen):

http://www.chrissystems.com/brushes.htm

And this for the SH in the show ring:

http://www.chrissystems.com/polishin.htm

And I like their combs too! But I actually own a Teflon coated comb (med/fine). A judge gave it to me so I can really tell you where I got it!

GK doesn't agree with me on the necessity of brushes but each to her own

ETA. Found it! http://www.revivalanimal.com/store/p...lon-Combs.aspx
post #17 of 17
The only time I've seen any kind of brush being used in a show hall is the little rubber curry comb (very short nubs) that was used on a Siamese/Oriental. Then they used the flea comb after that I have seen the pin brushes being used on a longhair with the combs.

I've gotten a little coat out of Charlie with the flea comb, but mainly use my hands (especially after the bath). When he's dry from the bath, I use the flea comb to get any of the loose hair.
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