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If you smoke... please, please, PLEASE stop! - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie-poo View Post
Absolutely untrue!

Smoking directly causes vasoconstriction. The definition of vasoconstriction is that blood vessels constrict, or become narrower, leading to reduced blood flow. If your vessels are already compromised by athrosclerosis (or diabetes)...then smoking CAN AND WILL cause a heart attack.

I'm so sorry Carol. You and your aunt are in my prayers.
Can't argue this. My 44 year old Type 1 Diabetic, smoking husband had a heart attack a few years back.

Boy, the two of us were stupid. Thank goodness we are both non smokers now.
post #32 of 40
So sorry about you aunt. I hope she recovers.

I have never had the desire to smoke, and I never will.

My grandpa smoked something like two packs a day until he was eighty and he had an aneurysm and died. I'm thinking it could only be a result of his smoking, because he was an otherwise healthy man and he never drank.

Anyway, whenever I see someone smoking I can't help think that they are killing themselves. It's one of the worst addictions out there. I know what it does to your body and it just scares me that they put all of those toxins in there and expect you to not realize how much your body is sacrificing for "pleasure".
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadieandziggy View Post
My dad gave up smoking after a heart attack in February this year. Heart Attacks are not Caused by smoking!!
This morning I felt further compelled to address this ridiculous idea...
I want to elaborate a little on what I posted yesterday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie-poo View Post
Absolutely untrue!

Smoking directly causes vasoconstriction. The definition of vasoconstriction is that blood vessels constrict, or become narrower, leading to reduced blood flow. If your vessels are already compromised by athrosclerosis (or diabetes)...then smoking CAN AND WILL cause a heart attack.

I'm so sorry Carol. You and your aunt are in my prayers.
One of the primary components of cigarette smoke is carbon monoxide (CO).
http://www.csn.ul.ie/~stephen/reports/bc4927.html

The affinity between carbon monoxide and hemoglobin is 240 times stronger than the affinity between hemoglobin and oxygen. CO binds to hemoglobin, producing carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) - carbon monoxide toxicity arises from the formation of carboxyhemoglobin, which decreases the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. This inhibits the transport, delivery, and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level.

Carbon monoxide is life-threatening to humans and other forms of air-breathing life, as inhaling even relatively small amounts of it can lead to hypoxic injury, neurological damage, and possibly death. A concentration of as little as 0.04% (400 parts per million) carbon monoxide in the air can be fatal. There are 30,000 ppm carbon monoxide in undiluted cigarette smoke.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning

If a person has compromised vasculature due to athrosclerosis, peripherial vascular disease or diabetes, and smoking causes those vessles to constrict, which decreases the already compromised blood flow....how can blood (hemoglobin) that is tied up with the carbon monoxide possibly oxygenate the tissues? A heart attack is the death of cardiac muscle due to inadequate oxygenation....regardless of how that inadequate oxygenation occurs...by blockage, or by restricted bloodflow exacerbated by poor perfusion secondary to cigarette smoking.

If even one person is persuaded to give up smoking by my links and information, I will feel like I've done a good thing here....

Okay...enough of my hijack....I'll get off my soapbox now.
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie-poo View Post
This morning I felt further compelled to address this ridiculous idea...
I want to elaborate a little on what I posted yesterday...



One of the primary components of cigarette smoke is carbon monoxide (CO).
http://www.csn.ul.ie/~stephen/reports/bc4927.html

The affinity between carbon monoxide and hemoglobin is 240 times stronger than the affinity between hemoglobin and oxygen. CO binds to hemoglobin, producing carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) - carbon monoxide toxicity arises from the formation of carboxyhemoglobin, which decreases the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. This inhibits the transport, delivery, and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level.

Carbon monoxide is life-threatening to humans and other forms of air-breathing life, as inhaling even relatively small amounts of it can lead to hypoxic injury, neurological damage, and possibly death. A concentration of as little as 0.04% (400 parts per million) carbon monoxide in the air can be fatal. There are 30,000 ppm carbon monoxide in undiluted cigarette smoke.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning

If a person has compromised vasculature due to athrosclerosis, peripherial vascular disease or diabetes, and smoking causes those vessles to constrict, which decreases the already compromised blood flow....how can blood (hemoglobin) that is tied up with the carbon monoxide possibly oxygenate the tissues? A heart attack is the death of cardiac muscle due to inadequate oxygenation....regardless of how that inadequate oxygenation occurs...by blockage, or by restricted bloodflow exacerbated by poor perfusion secondary to cigarette smoking.

If even one person is persuaded to give up smoking by my links and information, I will feel like I've done a good thing here....

Okay...enough of my hijack....I'll get off my soapbox now.

Very well said
post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 
Pookie, my friend, that's not a hijack -- that's lifesaving information, delivered far more authoritatively than I could ever have put it. Thank you so much!
post #36 of 40
I am sorry for your Aunt Peggy, and all the rest of you that have lost family members to smoking related illnesses. My SO has lost several members of his family to cancer.
I am so proud of him right now, he is quitting smoking, and doing very well. His doc prescribed him Chantix, and it seems to be helping him a lot. We have had a lot of stress lately, and he has smoked a little, but normally he would have been smoking 2 packs instead of 3-4 cigarettes, one right after another. I have wanted him to quit for years, but he is a grown man and will quit without me nagging at him.
I used to be a heavy smoker, but quit many years ago. Best wishes and good vibes to all of you trying to quit now.
post #37 of 40
My grandma died on St. Patty's day this year. For the past 7 years, she was in and out of the hospital with pneumonia, and she had COPD/emphysema. She was a CHAIN smoker inside her house. I would spend a lot of time with her in the summers when I was young, and as soon as she mashed one out she'd light up another. The last years of her life she spent in bed, and it was like she had already died. I am glad she's not in pain anymore, but I miss her.

People who smoke, I understand that it's hard to quit. I smoked one or two cigarettes a day since high school. Even a couple years out of college I still would smoke from time to time. I've been completely smoke free for a few months now and I haven't even wanted one. And you may think that quitting smoking causes tumors and cancer to develop, but that's just not true. PLEASE read the info I've posted below. You can do it!

When smokers quit, within twenty minutes of smoking that last cigarette the body begins a series of changes.

At 20 minutes after quitting:
*blood pressure decreases
*pulse rate drops
*body temperature of hands and feet increases

At 8 hours:
*carbon monoxide level in blood drops to normal
*oxygen level in blood increases to normal

At 24 hours:
*chance of a heart attack decreases

At 48 hours:
*nerve endings start regrowing
*ability to smell and taste is enhanced

The first year after quitting:

At 2 weeks to 3 months:
*circulation improves
*walking becomes easier
*lung function increases

1 to 9 months:
*coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, shortness of breath decreases

1 year:
*excess risk of coronary heart disease is decreased to half that of a smoker

Long-term Benefits of Quitting

At 5 years:
*from 5 to 15 years after quitting, stroke risk is reduced to that of people who have never smoked.

At 10 years:
*risk of lung cancer drops to as little as one-half that of continuing smokers
*risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas decreases
*risk of ulcer decreases

At 15 years:
*risk of coronary heart disease is now similar to that of people who have never smoked
*risk of death returns to nearly the level of people who have never smoked

I don't want to preach to the choir, because I know smokers already know what it does, but I had to put my 2 cents in.
post #38 of 40
I don't think it can be stressed enough what good quitting will do for you. Thanks for that info!
post #39 of 40
I am sorry to hear about your aunt. I will keep her in my prayers.
post #40 of 40
I'm so sorry to hear about your aunt. I'll keep her in my prayers.
I was born into a family that smoked. My aunts,uncles,grandparents and family friends were all smokers. I started at the age of 17 and smoked off and on for 13 years.
I finally decided to quit in July as a 30th birthday present to myself.
I used the nicotine patch for the first two weeks and have been mostly fine since then. I still have cravings...believe me...I don't know if they'll ever completely go away but I take a deep breath, pop a piece of gum in my mouth and move past it.
After I quit,my Mom and Dad (smokers for over 30 years) also decided to stop smoking. It's been tough on everyone but having support from family has made a HUGE difference.
I have always used stress as an excuse to start smoking again. There was always a "good" reason to pick up a cigarette (ie. late bills, kids stressed me out,fighting with DH,ect.)
No matter the things going on in my life it's no longer an option to have a cigarette. I meditate or take a walk instead.
I pray that my children will learn from my mistake and not repeat it.
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