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Are we taking pet advocacy too far? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post
If the cat had a collar and I returned it to the owner and then later saw that cat roaming around the streets again, I would take that cat and rehome it.
And you'd be breaking the law.

My current cats are indoors only.
I had one that would bolt for the door every time it was opened, and he was successful about 60% of the time.
If someone were to assume he was being let out and rehomed him, I would most certainly have pressed charges.
Microchips are great things.

I think I can safely assume that you have never had a cat that simply did not tolerate being indoors.
If they don't tolerate (which is not the same as simply not liking indoor life) it, they stop thriving and go into decline which to me is simply another form of abuse., it's not simply a matter of forcing them to stay indoors.

We had a pair of cats like that when I was growing up, they were spayed, kept up to date on vaccs and provided with food and shelter, they were also tattooed since a collar would not have been safe for them.
post #32 of 45
IMO, you just don't have the right to take a cat, simply because it's outside, or simply because you returned it once before and told the people they should keep the cat inside. You have no idea who your hurting by doing this. And you cannot decide that the cat is not cared for, becausse it's outside. If a cat is USED to going outside, you are never going to keep that cat in if they want to go out. It is like taking the law into your own hands, when you do that. People don't HAVE to keep their cat indoors, just because you bring it back to them, and demand that they do.

I personally don't believe in letting cats outside, but it's not up to ME to demand that my neighbours keep their cat inside, just because I don't approve of it.

It would be just like someone who thinks it's cruel to keep cats indoors (and there are people that believe that) came into my house when I was at work and set all of my cats free. There is NO difference.
post #33 of 45
Thread Starter 
NoRachelHere - that sounds like a case of actual abuse rather than the ascertion that the cat is better off not outside and on organic food that the catnapper in the case I posted did. Even more annoying to me is the letter which they posted in the newspaper where the catnapper still lets the cat go outside to 'run around' in the garden which is ok because this person live in the country not the city streets, when, IMO there are dangers to both.
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natalie_ca View Post

I would also tell them that you don't let a 2 year old child run around outside unsupervised and a cat is a perpetual 2 year old and need us to look out for their safety, just like a small child.
If you take an unsupervised 2 year old child for whatever reason, it is kidnapping period. Kidnapping is a crime. I would say the same for a cat.

Since this thread is not about indoor/outdoor cats I will not get into it. But a cat is not a perpetual 2 year old. They may be if you raise or treat them that way.
post #35 of 45
Like I said, I don't regret or apologize for my actions in looking out for animals because they cannot speak for themselves.

I'm not asking for anyone to approve of or condone my beliefs or actions that I have taken to protect an animal, nor am I open to people trying to "sway" me to change them.

We simply have differing views and that's just fine. I will continue to feel and do what I think is in the best interests of an animal that I deem to be in danger. And I consider an animal allowed to roam around on busy streets as a danger to them....period!

So you may as well return to discussing the actions of the person in the article from the original post instead of constantly attacking my statements.
post #36 of 45
I really don't see that there is anything to argue about. It was straight forward theft and the perpetrator should be prosecuted.
Just because you don't agree with something does not give you the right to take the law into your own hands.
I hope they are caught and that the owner's get their poor cat back.
post #37 of 45
This thread put a new perspective on what happened to a cat in this area recently. Oskar, a 3-year-old, microchipped cat wearing a collar and ID tag, accidentally got out of his family's camper in late August, and disappeared into the forest. They looked all over for him, contacted all the local shelters, police, etc., but couldn't find him. After a 33-day disappearance, a thin, dirty Oskar showed up on their doorstep. He'd apparently walked the 30 km. (18.6 miles) home, through forests and towns. In other words, he was determined to get home.

What if somebody had decided to catnap him, simply because he was out roaming, and never informed his family of his fate? That would have been so incredibly cruel to both the cat and his family.
post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
This thread put a new perspective on what happened to a cat in this area recently. Oskar, a 3-year-old, microchipped cat wearing a collar and ID tag, accidentally got out of his family's camper in late August, and disappeared into the forest. They looked all over for him, contacted all the local shelters, police, etc., but couldn't find him. After a 33-day disappearance, a thin, dirty Oskar showed up on their doorstep. He'd apparently walked the 30 km. (18.6 miles) home, through forests and towns. In other words, he was determined to get home.

What if somebody had decided to catnap him, simply because he was out roaming, and never informed his family of his fate? That would have been so incredibly cruel to both the cat and his family.
And since Oskar traveled 18.6 miles, any posters that the family put up may have not been noticed by Oskar's family.

Oliver is microchipped because he will not wear a collar. He has gotten out 5 times in his 8 years. Thank God I was able to get him back in right away each time. Imagine if he got out accidently and got disorientated or scared and traveled several miles? If a "good samaritan" picked him up and didn't notice the signs I would have posted they may have rehomed him. I would be so heartbroken without my Oliver!
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
And since Oskar traveled 18.6 miles, any posters that the family put up may have not been noticed by Oskar's family.

Oliver is microchipped because he will not wear a collar. He has gotten out 5 times in his 8 years. Thank God I was able to get him back in right away each time. Imagine if he got out accidentally and got disorientated or scared and traveled several miles? If a "Good Samaritan" picked him up and didn't notice the signs I would have posted they may have rehomed him. I would be so heartbroken without my Oliver!
People kid themselves when they think their cats won't accidentally get out. Our house is pretty ideal for indoor cats, because we have "buffer zones", meaning indoor doors several feet in front of our front and back doors, i.e., real vestibules. Nevertheless, Jamie has managed to "escape" several times, usually due to visitors' carelessness with the doors.

IMO, it's silly to try to punish people for letting their cats out, intentionally or accidentally, because most of the time, the catnapper has no idea of the circumstances.
post #40 of 45
There could be so many different spins on stories like this I guess you'd have to just take each case individually. Personally, I don't know anyone who goes out looking for cats to grab off the streets. For me, it is a BAD BAD day when I come across an animal that in my judgement needs help, because I can't live with myself if I turn away, and yet I don't have unlimited time and resources to care for them all. A few things on both sides of this story stuck me as odd.

My cat Bullseye, who passed away in January from SCC, was left behind by some neighbors who moved. They didn't *forget* him. Animal Control picked up their dogs. A couple years later the kids came back to the neighborhood looking for him because they had moved into a place where they could have pets again. DH told them he'd never seen that cat and immediately went and hid Bullseye from view. I would have liked to tell the little girl that her kitty had found a good home and was happy, but it seemed better left as it was.

Several of my cats were altered when I found them. I don't know how much effort a person has to make to find who they belong to. With the exception of the road kittens, I make some effort...check vet clinics, ask around, file a report, post a sign. I don't do all of these every time, but I do something. I have NEVER been so lucky as to locate an owner. So I guess the question is, at what point do you have the right to even decide than an animal is unowned? When they show up daily begging for food? Need medical treatment? To date, I've taken 4 cats off the road who were hit by cars, still alive, and had to decide what to do with them. I hate to use money as a measure, but if you put a few hundred dollars into veterinary care for a cat, would you be real eager to give it back to someone who'd let it run across the road again?

One thing I'm quite certain of, if I actually decided to swipe someone's cat because I thought it was being mistreated or neglected, the LAST thing I would ever do is write a ransom note. Kitty would just disappear, and then live happily every after...somewhere else. Ideally, letting the law handle things is what should be done, but I guess I watch too much Animal Police. How many animal control officers are there for hundreds of square miles and a million people? Way too few. Sometimes I think you just have to do what you believe is right and hope that doesn't make you one of the nut cases that always goes to extremes on either side of an issue.
post #41 of 45
That's why many jurisdictions require "found" animals be reported to/surrendered to the local animal control authorities. The people who find them are legally obligated to notify the applicable authorities. Enforcement, as with many other animal laws, is probably close to nonexistent.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenC511 View Post
That's why many jurisdictions require "found" animals be reported to/surrendered to the local animal control authorities. The people who find them are legally obligated to notify the applicable authorities. Enforcement, as with many other animal laws, is probably close to nonexistent.
Sadly, most if not all of the cats I have acquired would be euthanized by animal control, for one reason or another. Health issues, temperment, age, etc. I guess they'll just have to spend their limited resources pursuing worse criminals than myself.
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
People kid themselves when they think their cats won't accidentally get out.
Tricia, you are so right. It amazes me how many times I have to remind guests to shut the door as soon as they enter. Some of them even say, Oh, don't worry, he doesn't look like he wants to get out.
post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 
It even happens in the shelter, we often have cats in reception coming in / out to vets and pet stores or being looked at or separated for some reason and people ignore the signs and doubled doors all the time
post #45 of 45
I definetely think that this person has gone too far. Obviously this particular kitty was well taken care of and loved its home. It's not fair to the pet or its owner to steal it just becuase you don't think that it should be allowed outdoors. That said I do think it's okay to take a pet that is homeless or obviously being abused. The first step should always be reporting the problem to the authorities though.
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