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Is it just me? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by laureen227 View Post
similarly, i parked in a 'pregnant mothers' spot at the grocery store the week after i had gall bladder surgery. i wasn't pregnant, but i needed a close spot, just for a different reason.
That's a new one. I've never heard of Pregnant Mothers Spots. We don't have those here. We only have Handicapped.
post #32 of 53
We have pregnant mother / young children spots here but for most places you don't need any special permit to use them, it is just frowned on if you 'steal' them
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
We have pregnant mother / young children spots here but for most places you don't need any special permit to use them, it is just frowned on if you 'steal' them
We have them here too, at grocery stores & department stores
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rapunzel47 View Post
I completely agree that what that driver did (stopping to light up and thereby blocking other people) was inconsiderate. It would be inconsiderate, no matter who did it.


I totally hate when people (with the placard or not) decide to drive their own way as if they were the only people on the road.

Sorry, I don't fully understand the OP...my only thought is that she meant that if you've been a given a second chance at life, why waste it by smoking? or perhaps why must you effect the rest of society because of your want instead of your needs? again...

A side note, and not sure if its like this in oother states, but in MI if you're under 4'10", you can apply for a h/c placard. I had a roommate in college that thought about it, but since she had really tall friends she was use to walking with long strides. She also felt that the placard should go to someone who can't walk instead of a height being the reason.
post #35 of 53
How about I drive past a hospital and people are smoking while on oxygen!!!!! What the heck is with that!
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunasmom View Post


I totally hate when people (with the placard or not) decide to drive their own way as if they were the only people on the road.

Sorry, I don't fully understand the OP...my only thought is that she meant that if you've been a given a second chance at life, why waste it by smoking? or perhaps why must you effect the rest of society because of your want instead of your needs? again...

A side note, and not sure if its like this in oother states, but in MI if you're under 4'10", you can apply for a h/c placard. I had a roommate in college that thought about it, but since she had really tall friends she was use to walking with long strides. She also felt that the placard should go to someone who can't walk instead of a height being the reason.

My impression of the OP, was that if a person smokes, they should not be entitled to the Handicapped Placard regardless of whether or not they're handicapped. I may have mis understood, but that's how it read to me. If I'm wrong, then I'm sorry.

I've never heard of short people being entitled to placards, but I don't really see being short as a disability, unless a person is a dwarf, and in that situation, it probably would be very difficult to walk long distances, and even harder to be seen by traffic, if they had to walk across a busy parking lot. However, I think a person that is 4 ft 10 in, with a normal body structure can walk as well as anyone else.
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eburgess View Post
How about I drive past a hospital and people are smoking while on oxygen!!!!! What the heck is with that!
That is their choice. It's their life, not yours.
post #38 of 53
Going out on a completely different limb, here, but smoking and the related illnesses and problems cost more than 12.7 billion dollars per year of taxpayers money, and this is just in Australia.

So, yes, smoking is a personal choice, but this cannot be used as a reason to excuse it when, for example, you are in a hospital on oxygen and the billions of dollars being thrown into saving your life and the millions of hours of manpower from nurses, doctors and all the other carers likewise involved is something you are effectively throwing back in their faces.

If you make the choice to smoke, you should also make the choice to forego medical treatment if you become sick as a result. Doesn't seem like such a `personal' problem when you look at it like that, does it?

Oh, and by the way, I smoke, so I'm not up on the non-smokers soapbox here, either.
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
If you make the choice to smoke, you should also make the choice to forego medical treatment if you become sick as a result. Doesn't seem like such a `personal' problem when you look at it like that, does it?
Except in this country a combination of you, your employer, and maybe the taxpayer are footing the bill. And sometimes, just you.

And... if we want to go that route, anyone who has an illness as a result of their weight or diet, choice of employment in a hazardous field, suicide attempt, drug addiction, or car accident should to. And that's not a slippery slope, I don't think. All result from things which could reasonably be called personal decisions.
post #40 of 53
Did the OP ever make their point regarding this post? I also got the impression that the intent was to say that if someone smokes, they don't deserve the handicapped placard. If it was, why would that matter? Am I in the wrong because I park in the handicapped spot at the liquor store? (btw, I am disabled and have a registered plate).

What irks me when it comes to handicapped parking spots are when I see huge SUV's, trucks, and especially Hummers, basically anything that requires a step ladder to get into them, parking in those spots. I just don't see how you need a placard or plate so you don't have to walk far to the door, yet you can climb up until a vehicle that has a 3 foot ground clearance.
post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReesesPBC View Post
What irks me when it comes to handicapped parking spots are when I see huge SUV's, trucks, and especially Hummers, basically anything that requires a step ladder to get into them, parking in those spots. I just don't see how you need a placard or plate so you don't have to walk far to the door, yet you can climb up until a vehicle that has a 3 foot ground clearance.
They might have a wheelchair lift, as you need a big car for them. One of my husband's co-workers has three kids in wheelchairs (they've adopted several special-needs kids), and both she and her husband drive SUVs.
post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
Except in this country a combination of you, your employer, and maybe the taxpayer are footing the bill. And sometimes, just you.

And... if we want to go that route, anyone who has an illness as a result of their weight or diet, choice of employment in a hazardous field, suicide attempt, drug addiction, or car accident should to. And that's not a slippery slope, I don't think. All result from things which could reasonably be called personal decisions.
Agreed - however, smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the first world. Think of all the resources and funding that could go into other illnesses, diseases and care if all the people who smoke stopped draining the medical system - and, yes, the people who are obese or addicted to drugs or alcohol. I'm not saying there shouldn't be help for these people, of course - but where do you draw the line? Where do you say `enough is enough' and start making people accept the consequences of their actions? In terms of smoking and obesity, I think something needs to be changed in terms of accountability. Education is helping, of course, enormously - but I'm pretty sure that if medical care started being withheld from people under certain conditions and circumstances, they'd stop their habits pretty quickly.

I don't consider that suicide belongs in this category - sure, it may be a choice but what led to it probably isn't. Same with car accidents, or choice of employment in a hazardous field. There is self-inflicted and self-inflicted, after all.
post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Agreed - however, smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the first world. Think of all the resources and funding that could go into other illnesses, diseases and care if all the people who smoke stopped draining the medical system - and, yes, the people who are obese or addicted to drugs or alcohol. I'm not saying there shouldn't be help for these people, of course - but where do you draw the line? Where do you say `enough is enough' and start making people accept the consequences of their actions? In terms of smoking and obesity, I think something needs to be changed in terms of accountability. Education is helping, of course, enormously - but I'm pretty sure that if medical care started being withheld from people under certain conditions and circumstances, they'd stop their habits pretty quickly.

I don't consider that suicide belongs in this category - sure, it may be a choice but what led to it probably isn't. Same with car accidents, or choice of employment in a hazardous field. There is self-inflicted and self-inflicted, after all.
My point in including them is that things like smoking are personal choices only partially. Any addiction is a true illness, just like depression. Employment in a hazardous field and car accidents are personal choices that might be avoidable, might not be; you choose to drive a car, you choose to take that job, even though you might not really have a choice.

We agree on the basic point that the behaviors that lead to a majority of the illnesses in our countries need to be curbed. I just don't think withholding medical care from people is the best way to do it; and forcing people to pay for it themselves would in many cases be the same as withholding it.

Things like the movement to remove trans fats from foods, banning indoor smoking... it'll have to be baby steps in public health until people realize that what they do on a daily basis affects their health.
post #44 of 53
All this discussion reminded me of another issue with some people in parking lots, handicapped or not.

A friend of mine was 8 1/2 months pregnant when she came out of her doctor's office to find that the person next to her parked so close to the driver's side of her car that even a super skinny person would have trouble getting in. Entering the car from the passenger side was out of the question.

Since it would have been impossible to find who the car belonged to (this was at a hospital where there are several doctor's offices in several buildings) she contacted the parking lot security and they had the car TOWED!!

I would have loved to see the look on their face when they came out to find their car gone!
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
My point in including them is that things like smoking are personal choices only partially. Any addiction is a true illness, just like depression. Employment in a hazardous field and car accidents are personal choices that might be avoidable, might not be; you choose to drive a car, you choose to take that job, even though you might not really have a choice.

We agree on the basic point that the behaviors that lead to a majority of the illnesses in our countries need to be curbed. I just don't think withholding medical care from people is the best way to do it; and forcing people to pay for it themselves would in many cases be the same as withholding it.

Things like the movement to remove trans fats from foods, banning indoor smoking... it'll have to be baby steps in public health until people realize that what they do on a daily basis affects their health.
Yup, I agree - and banning indoor smoking etc has already been in effect in Australia for a very long time. Here, you are not even allowed to smoke in outdoor venues such as football grounds, concert venues etc. The smoking bans in Australia are very, very strict.

As for withholding medical care, we do it at our practice. I work for an orthopaedic surgeon and if a patient's recovery or surgery will be put at risk by their weight or their smoking, my boss will refuse to operate on them until they have lost weight / quit smoking - whatever the case may be.

In terms of orthopaedics, these are not life-threatening conditions, but elective procedures. If the patient's safety is going to be compromised because of their habits, they have to change their habits before we'll go ahead and treat them. Perfectly reasonable, and if some people moan about it, most don't. They lose the weight, or quit smoking, and get their operation and the best possible result.

That is the kind of thing I'm talking about - not refusing care to someone who has emphysema or cancer!
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Yup, I agree - and banning indoor smoking etc has already been in effect in Australia for a very long time. Here, you are not even allowed to smoke in outdoor venues such as football grounds, concert venues etc. The smoking bans in Australia are very, very strict.

As for withholding medical care, we do it at our practice. I work for an orthopaedic surgeon and if a patient's recovery or surgery will be put at risk by their weight or their smoking, my boss will refuse to operate on them until they have lost weight / quit smoking - whatever the case may be.

In terms of orthopaedics, these are not life-threatening conditions, but elective procedures. If the patient's safety is going to be compromised because of their habits, they have to change their habits before we'll go ahead and treat them. Perfectly reasonable, and if some people moan about it, most don't. They lose the weight, or quit smoking, and get their operation and the best possible result.

That is the kind of thing I'm talking about - not refusing care to someone who has emphysema or cancer!
When my sister needed back surgery, her doctor told her he wouldn't do the surgery unless she quite smoking. He said it was because her recovery would be at risk if she smoked, so she had to quit for a month or so. I don't remember exactly how long. As soon as her surgery was over, she started back up again.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Yup, I agree - and banning indoor smoking etc has already been in effect in Australia for a very long time. Here, you are not even allowed to smoke in outdoor venues such as football grounds, concert venues etc. The smoking bans in Australia are very, very strict.

As for withholding medical care, we do it at our practice. I work for an orthopaedic surgeon and if a patient's recovery or surgery will be put at risk by their weight or their smoking, my boss will refuse to operate on them until they have lost weight / quit smoking - whatever the case may be.

In terms of orthopaedics, these are not life-threatening conditions, but elective procedures. If the patient's safety is going to be compromised because of their habits, they have to change their habits before we'll go ahead and treat them. Perfectly reasonable, and if some people moan about it, most don't. They lose the weight, or quit smoking, and get their operation and the best possible result.

That is the kind of thing I'm talking about - not refusing care to someone who has emphysema or cancer!
True, nobody should go through an elective procedure before ensuring they'll have the best chance of recovery. They won't do bariatric surgery on you if you won't quit overeating, either.
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopeHacker View Post
My impression of the OP, was that if a person smokes, they should not be entitled to the Handicapped Placard regardless of whether or not they're handicapped. I may have mis understood, but that's how it read to me. If I'm wrong, then I'm sorry.
That's my impression too.
post #49 of 53
The mere fact that some people are BREATHING irks me.

I have to say, the OP makes zero sense, and I'm quite amused by the various attempts at interpreting the OP.

Take it easy folks - instead of being stressed out because someone makes you wait LESS THAN 10 SECONDS so they can light a cigarette, how about taking that 10 seconds to count some of your own blessings, so you can drive away feeling pity (rather than condescension) for the smoker and more superior about your own life, because you are obviously so far above those that are in your way.
post #50 of 53
Nicely said, Ginger
post #51 of 53
Nicely said Betsy, most of us could do with slowing down once in a while and taking in what is around us instead of being in such a rush and potentially missing something important in the mean time
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eburgess View Post
How about I drive past a hospital and people are smoking while on oxygen!!!!! What the heck is with that!
I like walking out and seeing the same people telling US to quit inhaling a Marlboro. I would drive by a university-affiliated hospital and see that everyday. I recognized a few of them from prior visits and when I smoked they would give me the lecture. Nice, huh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HopeHacker View Post
I've never heard of short people being entitled to placards, but I don't really see being short as a disability, unless a person is a dwarf, and in that situation, it probably would be very difficult to walk long distances, and even harder to be seen by traffic, if they had to walk across a busy parking lot. However, I think a person that is 4 ft 10 in, with a normal body structure can walk as well as anyone else.
4'10" rings a bell, but then again the last time I saw this roommate was 11 years ago...and she was VERY short. I'm 5'9" and she came just above my hip, so perhaps she was 4'2" or 4'3". Either way it was because the reason you stated, that she was considered short enough to be able to have difficulty walking long distances. But the placard is purely optional, it's just there in the event someone needs it.
post #53 of 53
I have a handicapped sticker because I have a heart problem, and have trouble walking because of a lower back problem. One does not need to be in a wheelchair to have a sticker. I don't use a cane for short distances but still use the handicapped spots.
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