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nation of wimps

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...ess-bans_x.htm

ok so, no more playing tag, no more dodge ball, no toy guns, no jungle gyms and we wonder why we have a nation of over weight kids, Dont let them outside to play they may get hurt, the ball games where no scores are kept, everyone is a winner, everyone gets ice cream or pizza.

What a joke, real life is not like that. life is a competition, how you win is just as important as how you lose. Your boss is not going to give you bouns for not doing your job. Humans need a goal, they need something to work for.
You want to win, you want something better, then work for it,

All of these, we just want what is best for the kids stuff many places are doing , are not doing what is best for the kids. the way i see they are setting the kids up for trouble later.
post #2 of 28
You have got to be kidding I love to see my children play dodgeball, tag in the park. it is healthy and fun, yes there is bumps and bruises, I don't know anyone who died from playing tag, Who makes up these stupid rules
post #3 of 28
Overprotective parents and paranoid school boards are behind this. It's a shame that kids can't be kids anymore. Everyone wants them turned into docile little adults. Schools around here have all this newfangled playground equipment which, IMO, is much more dangerous for the kids. I can understand that some kids can be rough,accidently and on purpose, but isn't that what the teachers are for? To Supervise??? NO! They sit around chit-chatting amongst themselves during recess, so the less they have to take care of, the better. I'm not saying they ALL do, just most of them....around here anyway!
post #4 of 28
Banning those kinds of activities is strictly a "cover your a##" deal -- it's for the benefit of the schools' liabilities, NOT the kids. It's ridiculous. Kids still need fresh air and exercise.

BUT -- I have to take issue with that if saying it presumes that not being involved in outdoor games makes a kid a wimp.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coaster View Post
Banning those kinds of activities is strictly a "cover your a##" deal -- it's for the benefit of the schools' liabilities, NOT the kids. It's ridiculous. Kids still need fresh air and exercise.

BUT -- I have to take issue with that if saying it presumes that not being involved in outdoor games makes a kid a wimp.
not just outdoor stuff, Some of these groups keep trying to remove
all types of competition, from the lives of kids.

Like my nephew baseball games, They dont even keep score in the games.
I mean he around 13 years old, What age, is it ok for the kids to play to win.
Games and competition are important,We need to learn these things also. They are a part of life.
post #6 of 28
Everyone is terrified of being sued. That's the driving force behind a lot of absurd public school policies.

A few litigious idiots managed to terrify everyone into dumbing down the country.
post #7 of 28
A old friend hit the nail right on the head a few years ago when he said it has be come "Too Safe America." He and his wife home school their kids and hang out with like minded parents to prevent their kids from beccoming wimpy little weasels that have no idea of hard work or winning in competition. Every kid is not a winner at everything, and it is not helping them grow up to be productive adults by teaching them that they are, and the ones that work hard and do well should carry their little no load behinds.
I better stop now, this is one of my pet peeves.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...ess-bans_x.htm

ok so, no more playing tag, no more dodge ball, no toy guns, no jungle gyms and we wonder why we have a nation of over weight kids, Dont let them outside to play they may get hurt, the ball games where no scores are kept, everyone is a winner, everyone gets ice cream or pizza.

What a joke, real life is not like that. life is a competition, how you win is just as important as how you lose. Your boss is not going to give you bouns for not doing your job. Humans need a goal, they need something to work for.
You want to win, you want something better, then work for it,

All of these, we just want what is best for the kids stuff many places are doing , are not doing what is best for the kids. the way i see they are setting the kids up for trouble later.


And this is why MY son is overweight! Honestly... they only have them run around the field for 10 mins, give them water and let them talk the rest of the time.
He's scared to death to get into any sports in fear he will get hurt

I grew up doing phys ed, running track,softball, basketball, dodgeball, riding my bike WITHOUT a helmet and skating w/o pads.... I am perfectly fine..... or..... I think I am
post #9 of 28
About the only thing I agree on is no toy guns.
I grew up in a house full of guns, and was not allowed toy guns, we were all sent to gun safety as soon as we could grasp the importance (in my case I was 8).
Guns really should never be thought of as play things.

All of that other stuff banned is just a big load of crap.
Kids need to be kids.
post #10 of 28
I don't like encouraging kids to think of guns as playthings, but on the gun message board I frequent (for women gun owners), a lot of the moms didn't allow their kids to have toy guns, so the kids (boys) just pretended everything else was a gun. That doesn't mean that they allow them to play with toy guns, but past a certain point, they just threw up their hands and let the kids play their games, even if that meant pretending the remote control or an oddly shaped piece of toast was a gun. Combat/warfare/fighting-type games just seem to be hard-wired in a lot of kids (boys, mostly).

As far as trying to "protect" kids from competition, those kids better not come looking for a job from me. I want to work with people who are competitive and strive to be number one and always improve on current performance, no matter how good it already is.

My parents raised me to be very competitive (at the sports/activities of my choosing). They didn't force me to participate, but if I was going to participate (with significant financial/time/emotional contributions on their part), I better be doing the absolute best I could. When I screwed up, they didn't hold my hand and cry with me. They told me what I needed to do to be better. When I excelled, it was cause for celebration - there was no celebration when I lost. I got my feelings hurt a few times. I still feel like it was significantly better than the alternative and will serve me well throughout my life.
post #11 of 28
It is getting way out of hand. My kids are grown and on their own and I wonder how they ever survived. I am 51 and by todays rules none of us should have survived childhood. I never had any serious injuries and no one I knew ever had anything more serious than a broken bone. No debilitating injuries and no deaths from what we considered normal play.
post #12 of 28
How stupid is that!

Theres some parks over here that have laid down rubber so the kids don't hurt themselves. How many scrapes and minor cuts did we all have when we were kids and weve lived to tell the tale!.

Their wrapped up in cotton wool and it's no wonder kids get so many illnesses.
post #13 of 28
I wish at some point that the school boards would sit there and tell these overprotective parents "Get over yourself. You son/daughter is going to get hurt and that's a part of life and growing up".

Maybe the parents opposed to this should sue the schools for contributing to childhood obesity. Then perhaps they will bring back all the childhood games and realize how ridiculous it is.

Really seriously. How many glasses I went through because I was pelted in the head (by accident) by a rubber ball? Anyone play Crack the Wipe as a kid? I remmeber falling off the end of the "whip" and doing somersaults on the playground before coming to a stop.

It's just stupid.
post #14 of 28
What ever happened to letting a kid get some bumps and bruises? My legs are covered in scars from childhood games and competitions and I'm not damaged from them.

Aw heck my brother has a round scare in the middle of his chest from when we picked up lit roman candles and pointed them at each other.
post #15 of 28
Okay,, i'm obviously a wussy,, but... I hated dodgeball.. I hope my daughter never has to play that game.. I hated hated hated it,, and it hurt soo bad!!! Now tag was fun, and so was the jungle gym.. and that whole no toy guns, is a good move.. Best for them not to play with them so young in life..I think anyways..
post #16 of 28
My brothers and I grew up building forts, climbing trees, riding dirt bikes and go-carts. None of us ever owned a bicycle helmet. Yes, we got scrapes, bumps, bruises and one brother broke his thumb, wrestling with another one.

I raised two sons, the same way. By the time they were grown, they had incurred 3 sets of stitches and two broken bones between them.

So far, my granddaughters have sustained nothing more than scrapes, bumps and bruises but, as healthy energetic kids, its just a matter of time.

SHEESH! Kids are SUPPOSED to play!
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenC511 View Post
Everyone is terrified of being sued. That's the driving force behind a lot of absurd public school policies.

A few litigious idiots managed to terrify everyone into dumbing down the country.

AND the Judicial System. These idiot activist judges make me want to vomit.


The schools sure aren't listening to the parents regarding this issue are they?
How long are parents going to let this insanity escalate?
post #18 of 28
Oh, that happened when I was at school. We weren't allowed to run on the gravel part of the playground, couldn't play dodgeball in gym class, blah blah.

Didn't mean we didn't play those games anywhere else.
post #19 of 28
I really, truly feel sorry for kids today.

They can't go running around the neighborhood or ride their bikes around. And those that do are assumed to have bad parents for not supervising their kids. They can't play games at school, and since they can't hardley go outside for fear of the outside world, they probably don't play those games outside of school either.

These kids will never know what "Olly Olly In-Come-Free" or "Red Rover, Red Rover, Send Julie Right Over" mean. They won't know what Kick the Can or Crack the Whip are all about.

And they also won't know how to deal with the disappointment of being picked last, and working hard so you aren't picked last next time. Or how to deal with losing the game even though you did your best - the other team was just better. Or learning from harsh constructive criticism - yes, it hurts but they are trying to help you.

When these lessons aren't learned as children it puts them at a severe disadvantage as grown ups in the "real world".
post #20 of 28
Are things different other places? I mean... in the neighborhood I grew up in there's no problem with that sort of thing, not when I was little, not now. The kids I babysat for could always be seen riding their bikes home from wherever they had been as it got dark. The neighborhood my nephew is going to be growing up in is the same way, I don't think there will be an issue with him, once he is old enough, to be playing with the other kids.
post #21 of 28
When I was a child, I was always picked last or within the last 2 or 3 kids. I think it seriously scarred me for life. I have NEVER felt valued or appreciated by anyone. I've never felt as good as everyone else in this world. I think it's good that they might want to get rid of things that can scar kids emotionally. In some cases, like mine for example, it never taught me anything but how unworthy I was. Sadly it's carried over into my adulthood.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
Are things different other places? I mean... in the neighborhood I grew up in there's no problem with that sort of thing, not when I was little, not now. The kids I babysat for could always be seen riding their bikes home from wherever they had been as it got dark. The neighborhood my nephew is going to be growing up in is the same way, I don't think there will be an issue with him, once he is old enough, to be playing with the other kids.
Julie, we have stories at least monthly on the news of a kid either kidnapped or an attempted abduction. So around here, no...you really shouldn't just let your kids out to play with friends.

I wish it was more like it was when I grew up. We knew what our "boundaries" were in the neighborhood, but we just took off with our friends and played until either Mom yelled for dinner or it started getting dark, whichever came first. There was never any more danger to us than the bumps and scrapes of childhood. It's just not like that around here.
post #23 of 28
I don't think that "village" is doing such a great job raising our kid's Ms Clinton.
post #24 of 28
Does anyone remember "The Playground" from Bill Cosby's album "Wonderfulness"?
post #25 of 28
Ok here's another side to this story. My nephew Isaac just got hurt pretty badly two weeks ago while he was in his PE class. (he's 11). They were playing a game when him and another kid were running reallly fast after a ball and they ran into each other extremly hard. It knocked two of Isaac's teeth out and left a huge bruise on his chin when he fell after the hit and hit his chin really bad and made it bleed. It really hurt him and the way he hit the floor -they thought he could have had a concussion so he had to go to the doctor. (he wound up not having one luckily though) The other boy that ran into him (they both ran into each other head on) was hurt almost as badly. And there is a chance that this accident could have been prevented if the teacher had been supervising more properly. I'm not saying it was the teachers fault- but i do think that the teacher should have been keeping a better eye on them, especially during such a high contact game like the one they were playing. (both boys when asked said the teacher wasn't watching). Accidents happen- that's a given....but being cautious can definitely go a long way.

I understand that accidents happen- i am soo not for banning all of the games/sports out there- as they teach them important stills (sharing, healthy competition, working as a team, etc). I do however think that teachers and coaches in charge of supervising games/sports like these could potentially do a better job and make sure that the rules of the game are being enforced properly so the chances of accidents happening are less likely to occur. (not saying all of them- because many are wonderul- but there are definitely some who could improve)
post #26 of 28
I edited this post. I was writing examples of my childhood and my son's. I thought about the rest of the posts and decided everyone is writing from their own experience.

If you were good at the games and sports that are being banned, you can't see the reason behind the banning of them.

If you were bad at these games and sport, you probably are very happy with the bans.

Everyone experience will be different. The star athlete had more positive than negative experiences. People who didn't excel suffered; they were humiliated and and possibly scarred.

Dodgeball and games that have popularity inherent in them are great if your popular, if not it can be a living hell for some kids. I don't think those games serve as a life lesson for anyone.

As for organized sports, there are many adults living through their own kids, you've seen them at the games. I played sandlot baseball and learned a lot. If you weren't good, you weren't allowed up to bat and got stuck in the outfield. You learned to play better or were bored out in left field. I wish kids could just play without adult involvement, lots of life lessons to be learned there. Let me rephrase that, I wish kids could play like that or at least with responsible adult involvement.

There is a need for balance between the two extremes, where that point is will always be what everyone is searching for.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixie_Darlin View Post
I grew up doing phys ed, running track,softball, basketball, dodgeball, riding my bike WITHOUT a helmet and skating w/o pads.... I am perfectly fine..... or..... I think I am
I agree and we used to do this thing we called "boot hopin", where you would grab onto the bumper of a moving car and let them drag you down a snow covered road Not exactly the safest thing to do, but I still made it past childhood . Yes, we did get a lot of bumps, bruises, scrapes and so on on growing up and we didn't always come out on top or as a winner, but that is what life is about and you need to experience these things and learn from mistakes. In a lot of places, kids don't even get to enjoy going out at night for Halloween. I feel sorry for kids today, can't have any fun.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean-ji View Post
I edited this post. I was writing examples of my childhood and my son's. I thought about the rest of the posts and decided everyone is writing from their own experience.

If you were good at the games and sports that are being banned, you can't see the reason behind the banning of them.

If you were bad at these games and sport, you probably are very happy with the bans.

Everyone experience will be different. The star athlete had more positive than negative experiences. People who didn't excel suffered; they were humiliated and and possibly scarred.

Dodgeball and games that have popularity inherent in them are great if your popular, if not it can be a living hell for some kids. I don't think those games serve as a life lesson for anyone.
I see your point and perhaps I'm the exception. My own childhood was terrible when it came to organized sports. despite being tall and skinny, I was a slow runner, I was not popular, and I was always "picked on" when I played the games. For instance I remember playing 4-square in the 3rd grade and I entered into the 4-square. After 20 years I still remember the person that was "King" saying "Everyone work on getting Jenney out. Then we'll have people we like and an awesome game."

Yes, it sucked and later after school, I cried. But you know what? Hate the players, not the games. I still went back in line and kept playing everyday that it was popular. There were days I was smacked in the face (those times purely by accident - I think), but other than needing my glasses readjusted, I lived though it and came out mentally healthy...or so my therapist says
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