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post #61 of 73
And the reason for that is the desert. We're a HUGE country but our entire population is only 22 million or so people, and the very vast majority of our population live coastally. Ours is one of the harshest environments in the world. Many people die every year in the desert because it's just miles and miles and miles and miles and miles of nothing but searing heat, kangaroos, and feral cats. Lol.
post #62 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb View Post
The US is 3,537,441 square miles. Australia is 2,968,000 square miles. Not a whole lot of difference on the whole. The biggest difference is that so much of Australia is still wild, not developed by humans, so their ecosystems are closer to native than ours.
Thanks for the exact numbers. I could've looked them up, but I'm doing actual homework & browsing TCS at the same time....

Slightly OT question Sarah....when you say big, do you mean "Intact Tom Cat" big of like larger along the lines or Servals/small wildcats?
post #63 of 73
I'm thinking probably somewhere in between. Certainly, big enough that they couldn't be confused with domestic cats, unless it's a kind of half-grown feral kitten that is seen. Unfortunately, though, they still look enough like domestic cats that from a distance, or if the feral is young, that they could be confused. In many rural parts of Australia - not just the desert - people are pretty much indoctrinated to shoot cats on sight. Only criminals in urban areas have guns, so this is definitely a country / desert thing. It's something I abhor, it makes me furious that there is this conception that ALL cats are pests. But unfortunately the feral cat issue and the beating our environment and native species have taken as a result of ALL cats - feral or domestic - has meant that old habits die hard, for many.
post #64 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
And Australia was not `founded by murderers, thieves and prostitutes'
Thank you

I'm not sure I'm really for the cull, but I really don't think setting up a TNR clinic in the outback is ever going to happen. As much as I adore cats, when it comes down to saving native wildlife that has to come first.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixie_Darlin View Post
Or is a feral cat had rabies and attacked an endangered Dingo?
Australia is rabies free
post #65 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
And Australia was not `founded by murderers, thieves and prostitutes' They were brought here as prisoners and put to work, or in prison. So they didn't (themselves) found anything. I am soooo sick of documentaries that state that this is who we were founded by.

that is what all murderers and thieves say.

by the way i am kidding

hey so what if its part of your history, most people dont really know history so , dont worry about what they say, cause they wont let the truth stand in the way of a good story. Australia is never going to live that down, the same way that US had slaves a long time ago.
You have no idea how many documentaries leave out the truth, oh wait there is the moore movies so yea you know.
post #66 of 73
You can equate this with the American Mustang issue. Thousands of these animals have in the past been slaughtered, the meat shipped out to feed those overseas in an attempt to "stop" the overpopulation. However, this method proved futile and now the mustangs are routinely driven into pens (trapped) and then put up for adoption. No, there is no spaying going on, although the stallions are gelded. But, it has stopped the proliferation of the horses, and also stopped the slow starvation the horses were going through as man encroached more and more into their grazing land.

The problem that i have with this book, is it plants a bad idea into the head of the uneducated. Instead of dealing with humane ways to stop feral cat population it basically says- "Just eat the problem." As far as being diseased- in my experience with ferals and strays, the only diseased cats I have come across in the twenty some years I have been doing this have been cats from shelters and not the ones that are out in the world. Except one time, when a black tomcat Captain Midnight appeared and he had FeLV. He was euthanized due to his age and the advancement of the disease.
post #67 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
If anything, I think TNR should be occuring along with the culling...and hopefully, at some point, the culling can stop and TNR can be considered the preferred method to work with the feral cats.
Katie
I agree with this but I also ask the same question as Zissou'sMom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
So here's my question... how do you draw a distinction between animals that are morally okay to eat and ones that aren't? Is it physical attractiveness, taste, size, emotional bond, etc? Obviously there are plenty of societies and people who are just fine with eating cats or dogs, so it isn't anything inherent. Some people keep rabbits for pets and some people make stew out of them. There is one reason I don't eat any of them-- I never understood how it was totally wrong to kill/eat one animal (say, a cat) and totally fine to kill/eat another. What is the difference?
post #68 of 73
In the case of the mustangs, the method you describe has obviously worked well. I would like to see something like this happen with the feral cats, only there are millions, not thousands, and the area to try to capture these millions is many thousand square miles of unpopulated desert. The only thing out there is Uluru. I'm not saying that efforts shouldn't be made to combat this problem in a more humane fashion, but the terrain has to be taken into consideration as it's the biggest obstacle in the way of progress in this area.

And yeah, Bruce, we'll never be able to shake our penal beginnings. But I don't want to, either. It's part of our history and a huge part of our history. But the criminals did not found this nation, and whilst I'd like us to break free of our British ties, and become a republic, apparently much of the Australian population does not agree with me, as a referendum held on this issue some years back (things might be different now) overwhelmingly voted against becoming a republic. Shame, but what can you do?
post #69 of 73
Ewwww...I knew I didn't want to read this.

My first reaction was that it was an ignorant way to solve the problem. But then, as was pointed out, we reduce their population at what we refer to as *humane societies* because there just aren't enough homes for these animals, many of them pets. But being more civilized, we wouldn't think of eating them.

Today it's cats, but sooner or later what threatens this area and its indigenous wildlife will be us.

And...for those of you who eat meat...have you ever wondered what you're really eating sometimes.
post #70 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinder View Post
And...for those of you who eat meat...have you ever wondered what you're really eating sometimes.
Yep i do, Since most of the meat I get comes from family farms.
When i was living overseas, i would never eat from street vendors.
Unless i got to know the people that where cooking there first.
post #71 of 73
Before I became vegetarian I used to joke that I would still be able to eat pies, sausage rolls and those red mini party sausages because I was pretty sure there wasn't any meat in any of them

Of course, that's mostly true, which makes the thought of eating them very
post #72 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy View Post
You can equate this with the American Mustang issue.
Another introduced species that has no real right to be messing up the environment for the previously thriving populations of native animals?

As far as I'm concerned, "mustang" is just a pretty term for "feral horse". There is nothing inherently better or different about them than other horses raised "rough" on privately owned land.

Just because some horses manage to survive in a feral state does't mean they should. The same goes for cats.
post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by theimp98 View Post
Yep i do, Since most of the meat I get comes from family farms.
When i was living overseas, i would never eat from street vendors.
Unless i got to know the people that where cooking there first.
I'm afraid there are places overseas where I'd starve. Well, I guess there'd always be vegetables. I can usually recognize those.

My brother raises our beef so at least I know they've had a good life (for a cow) and died standing in their pasture.

I've never really been hungry in my life so I don't know what I'd actually eat if it were a matter of survival. I'm pretty sure if the cats and I got trapped in the basement that none of them would ever end up as lunch, but if my rescuers showed up and all they had was feral cat stew I can't say with any certainty what I'd do.

KitEKats4Eva!, I have picture in my mind where stuff like those mini sausages comes from. It involves a floor and a guy with a great big squeegee....
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