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NeEd HeLp!!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I am not sure whether this is the right place to post this but..

I am getting a new kitten soon, hopefully and I need help and advice.

What do I need, how much food should I give it a day, what are some recommended types of food and any other information!

Also any help on how to convince my mum would also be appreciated!
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaKit'n View Post
I am not sure whether this is the right place to post this but..

I am getting a new kitten soon, hopefully and I need help and advice.

What do I need, how much food should I give it a day, what are some recommended types of food and any other information!

Also any help on how to convince my mum would also be appreciated!
First, congrats on the kitten! How old is he/she going to be? It's best to wait until the kitten is between 8 and 12 wks old (closer to 12 if possible). That way they learn what they need to from their mommy.

You're going to need a litterbox, of course. Just make sure it is a comfortable height for the kitten. You can get a bigger one as it grows up. And, litter of course.

Food...kitten food is best for the first year. You have your choice of "high quality" and store bought. The high quality is the best, but mine get along fine with Friskies. They ate Friskies kitten when they are young, and now Friskies Indoor cat formula for adults. For kittens, I personally would recommend free feeding but that can be hard if there are any other animals in the house. But, it worked with mine...kittens need a lot of nurishment to grow, and having it available at all time so they can get a snack when they are hungry seems to work.

And, of course, you need toys! Kittens are easily amused, especially after 12 wks or so, because they have learned the "pounce" instinct! And, they will pounce on anything....your feet, your shoulder, your shoelace....so toys will save you a lot of trouble. You don't have to spend a lot of money on them. One of my kittens loved an old sock. They ALL loved foil balls. Empty boxes will keep them busy for hours!

Good luck! And when you get your baby, definitely post pics!!
post #3 of 13
Do you live with your mum? I'm not sure what the situation here is--it could be any one of several things; you could be a kid living with their mom, a college-age person paying rent, somebody living in a multiple-generation household, or somebody who's moved in with an elderly parent...

Here's why people are reluctant to get cats:

1. They cost money. Vet care, spay/neuter (your kitten will need this before 6 months; new anesthesia technology makes it possible at a weight of 2 pounds), food, toys, and the 'extras'--cat beds, cat furniture, grooming--that you can get along without (if you groom your cat yourself and don't mind sharing your furniture). If you're financially secure, then you'll be OK, but otherwise, you might need to take on a part-time job to pay for the cat... Assume an expenditure of anywhere from $20-$200 a month, depending on whether or not you're buying anything other than food and litter, and whether your cat goes to the vet that month. You'll need to be sure you can fit the cat into your budget. If you're a teen, you'll have to show your parents you're serious about a cat--get a job, get a bank account, and save up enough so that when you get your kitten, you can pay for its things and first vet visit. After that, the next big expense is neutering; but there are cheap spay/neuter programs (we can help you find the closest in your area).

2. Cats need care. Sure, it's fun to play with a cat, but are you willing to do it every single day? Will you scoop its litter box--every day, without fail? Will you groom it, clip its claws, and feed it on a regular schedule? Can you keep an eye on its health, to head off any problems before they get bad? Fleas, for example... Needless to say, a parent often believes that they will be the one to care for the cat after the initial excitement wears off. This is often true--because while it might be fun at first, eventually they will be chores, just like washing the dishes. However, they won't take long--maybe ten minutes a day--and can easily become a part of your routine. It's a matter of getting used to doing it, maybe at a set time every day like just before you go to bed, or just after you get up.

3. Litter boxes disgust some people. However, what probably got those people disgusted in the first place is a litter box that's scooped only once every other day, or even less--obviously, it will begin to smell! Urine, especially, is a culprit: Urea turns to ammonia, which smells horrible, after a while. And if you have a male cat, and don't neuter him, the litter box will smell extremely bad--if he doesn't spray elsewhere! But all that is easy to avoid: Neuter your cat, and scoop the box every day. I recommend keeping the box somewhere that's easy to sweep up; near the box, keep your litter scoop, a bag of fresh litter, a trash can, and a broom and dustpan or mini vacuum (for cleaning up litter that's tracked or sprayed out by an overenthusiastic digger).

4. Untrained cats often ruin furniture by scratching. And some people, either ignorant, cruel, or indifferent, solve this problem by declawing their cats--but this can cause problems for years afterwards. Declawing means amputating a cat's toes. The pain can be so bad for the cat that it associates scratching in its litter box with pain, and thereafter refuses to use the box. Various health problems, such as infections, muscle spasms, breathing problems, and even death are associated with declawing. So, the alternative? Training. Cats need to scratch to keep their nails healthy and their muscles strong, so you need to give them something to scratch on, something acceptable. Cats have different scratching styles; some like horizontal scratchers, some vertical. Make sure the scratcher is long enough for the cat to get a good stretch in. You can rub the scratcher with catnip (for an older cat), dangle a toy near it, or even take the cat's paws in your hands, if it will allow it, and "scratch" its paws on the post. I've had some success miming scratching with my own fingernails as well. In any case, a cat taught to use a scratching post can be discouraged from using other surfaces by a variety of methods: Tape, sticky side up; foil; bad-smelling (to cats) sprays; or training with a "NO", hiss, or loud clap. If worst comes to worst, you can use claw covers--plastic tips that glue onto a cat's claws, like false nails, and keep it from hurting anything it scratches. These need to be replaced periodically.

5. Some people just don't like cats. A caution: If this person might actually hurt the cat, don't get one--it's not worth it. But if the person just doesn't like, or know, cats, there's a recourse: Assure that person that you are willing to keep their room "off limits" to the cat, keep the litter box clean, and make sure the cat doesn't do any damage. Hopefully they will learn to tolerate each other, or perhaps like each other.
post #4 of 13
Kittens get fed three times per day for about a half hour to an hour each time. Bring whatever is left over up after that length of time. Once the kitten is a cat you can reduce that to twice a day. Adults get between a half cup and a cup each time. I can't speak for kittens.

"Mom;
People with pets are happier and live longer.
I promise I will use the odour killing pine pellets cat litter which absorbs odours like nobody's business and I'll scoop the feces daily and change the litter weekly without fail.
I'll get him a scratching post and teach him to use it so he won't scratch the furniture.
I'll also clip his nails so he'll be more comfortable to us and himself.
I know what I'm doing, Mom. I live with cats at Dad's place.
Trust me.
Oh, and I love you!"

X
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks

Just to clear things up, I live with my mum and we have two cats here and at my dad's we have two cats. But the cats we have here are outdoor cats so they hate coming inside so I play with them when they are in the garden. But I would love to have one of my own that lives inside.

Thank you for all the information and keep it coming!
It really helps!
post #6 of 13
I'd adopt a kitten about 10-12 weeks old at the MINIMUM age. Unless you have experience in dealing with kittens younger then that, its better to have an older kitten.

You will need to schedule a vet appointment when you adopt (try to get one in 2-3 days of adopting). The kitten will probably need to be wormed and given shots. Also schedule to have him/her neutered/spayed by the time they are 4 months old - they can breed and get pregnant that young!

Before you bring the kitten home have:

1. Litter and litter pan
2. Cat carrier
3. Separate food/water bowls in stainless steel or ceramic.
4. Cat toys
5. A GOOD sturdy tall scratching post - minimum of 4 feet high. Don't waste your money on the cheap 1-2 feet tall ones they sell in Walmart.
6. Nail clippers, flea comb, small brush (do not use a brush on a longhair).

Food - a good quality kitten food is best; Royal Canin, Chicken Soup for the Cat Lover's Soul are some examples. I'd get both a dry kitten food and some canned foods. Kittens need to eat about 3 times a day till around 5-6 months old - then twice a day.

I don't believe on keeping kittens on kitten food an entire year - most can be switched over to adult foods about 6 months old.

Keep us updated on what you adopt and post pictures
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
A few questions:
**So I feed the kitten 3 times a day, how much food should I give it each meal?
**Is Iams good? Or what about Fancy Feast? I give Iams to my other cats and they like it, I used to give them Chef's Blend but it was no good. What brand do you recommend?
**Is wet food or dry food better?
**Will the cat try to get my rabbit?
Thanks everyone.

I plan on asking my mum either tonight or tomorrow about it. WISH ME LUCK!
I am going to clean the entire house. Go and groom the cats and clean all of my animals and their cages. Plus I will make a poster board with all cat info and pics/profiles of cats that are available for adoption near us. Any more ideas??

I have had experience with kittens but not in a long time. The two cats that live with me are 16 and 19 years old...

Thanks you guys are soo much help!
post #8 of 13
Wow... 16 and 19, and outdoor cats? It's uncommon for outdoor cats to live that long, but I guess yours are smart, and lucky! Or else you live in an area that's quite safe for them.

I'm not sure if your mum will allow it, but getting two kittens will help them to stay entertained (and in less trouble) indoors.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Oh, thank you Callista, two kittens is a good idea too, that way they won't get too lonely. I am not sure how my mum will go for that idea.
post #10 of 13
Have you asked your mum yet? I would be great if you adopted a kitten. Here in the UK we appear not to have such a big problem with Cats but I'm learning so much about the US and Canada. I had no idea Cats were in so much need for homes. We had much older/disabled or ill cats in our Catteries over here, not healthy Cats and Kittens.

Good luck if you havn't asked her yet
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadieandziggy View Post
Have you asked your mum yet? I would be great if you adopted a kitten. Here in the UK we appear not to have such a big problem with Cats but I'm learning so much about the US and Canada. I had no idea Cats were in so much need for homes. We had much older/disabled or ill cats in our Catteries over here, not healthy Cats and Kittens.

Good luck if you havn't asked her yet
just to say , it is still a big problem here in the uk with rescues over run with kittens and pregnant cats especially kitten season.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxtashaxX View Post
just to say , it is still a big problem here in the uk with rescues over run with kittens and pregnant cats especially kitten season.
I didn't meen it like that. Of course it's a problem, but here down in the South West they get homed really quickly. It took us ages to find Ziggy because most of the other kittens we tried were already homed. It's probably because we've got so much countryside down here

Sorry if I caused any offence
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Oh yes I will definately be adopting.
All of my cats were adopted, except for one that we got from a friend.

Anyway, n I haven't asked my mum yet. Hopefully today!

Wish Me Luck!
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