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It's a bittersweet feeling

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have thought long and hard about it, but have opened up adoptions here at home for some of my clowder. So far, I have been able to find wonderful homes for four of the cats. But some, that I have bottle fed, struggled with illnesses or earned their trust, it is hard to let go.

I know that I am doing the right thing. I have ads everywhere trying to find the right kitty parents and many people have been rejected by me. I'm pretty tough on my requirements. But the bottom line is, that due to a shelter in another county shutting its doors to stray cats and an unrelenting kitten season, I have to get my numbers down.

I will miss each and every cat that has been nutured here. I can only pray that in talking with perspective kitty parents, interviewing their vets and visiting their homes will be enough safeguard to protect these wonderful cats I have shared my life with.
post #2 of 15
MA , it must be awful to let go, especially those you have had for awhile and watched improve. But by doing so, as you say, you can help others, both cat and human, to find permanent relationships and love, as well as new ones in need. But I feel for you.
post #3 of 15
I know how hard it is to let go, MA, but just think of how many precious lives you've been able to save and the joy they'll now bring to the people that adopt them. You'd done a wonderful thing!
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
With my numbers being so high, I was really concerned that I had moved out of the area of "rescuer" and was turning into a hoarder. But, in talking with a psychologist who specializes in counciling hoarders, she has assured me that if I was a hoarder, none of my cats would now be in other homes. So, I am relieved!

I also just got a call from someone I adopted out Mckinley to. He hid for about two hours, then came out into the house and slept on their bed last night and is now enjoying lap time with the family I couldn't be more pleased to know that he is a solo kitty and is going to reap all the benefits of being one in a loving home.
post #5 of 15
I know it's hard to let them go, but if you don't, you cannot take in more strays. And if you don't take in those strays, think about the lives & horrible deaths they'll face.
post #6 of 15
In this way, doing a lot if interwievs with wannabe catowners, you get to know a lot of them...

Some of them you rejected were surely unsuitable as catowners.
But some were no good for yours cats, but will perhaps be OK for some other cats. Say abandoned homecats.

And some of the approved owners may perhaps be persuaded into having another cat!

Thus, the work and effort done will surely be repaid twice or thrice:
Your own protegées happy - and in future, also other happy cats.
post #7 of 15
This must be so hard for you MA, but you are doing the best thing, by letting some of these go, you can then help more needy cats, and that is what we are here for at teh end of the day.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy View Post
I have thought long and hard about it, but have opened up adoptions here at home for some of my clowder. So far, I have been able to find wonderful homes for four of the cats. But some, that I have bottle fed, struggled with illnesses or earned their trust, it is hard to let go.

I know that I am doing the right thing. I have ads everywhere trying to find the right kitty parents and many people have been rejected by me. I'm pretty tough on my requirements. But the bottom line is, that due to a shelter in another county shutting its doors to stray cats and an unrelenting kitten season, I have to get my numbers down.

I will miss each and every cat that has been nutured here. I can only pray that in talking with perspective kitty parents, interviewing their vets and visiting their homes will be enough safeguard to protect these wonderful cats I have shared my life with.
Awww..MA...I know someone who is the same as you....she has a lot of cats that she rescued from less then ideal colonies and she is very tough about her requirements for a new home since some of these cats she had since they were bottle babies...but I do think if there is a chance for these cats to be in a good home, it does help to allow you to help others who need your assistance.

HUGS.

Katie
post #9 of 15
I would be really upset too if I were you, but I know you are doing the right thing for yourself as well as the new kitties and the ones going to new homes.

No one knows who will be an ideal parent better than you. And your cats and ferals who you have brought around are likely at a stage where they can bond to a new parent and have an even more rewarding life in the right home. Everyone knows you wouldn't let them go if it wasn't so.

I applaud you for doing the hard work of advertising and screening and finding new homes. That is much harder than keeping your existing kitties and not being able to help new ones. It is an example for everyone who does a lot of rescue.

My thoughts are with you as you go through this difficult process and am sending positive energy your way to keep you and your kitty family healthy throughout.
post #10 of 15
MA, although we don't want to risk Tuxie's health by bringing in a foster with a problem, the fact of the matter is that I don't have the emotional strength to foster and let them go. Especially if the fostering is longer than a few months.

My heart is breaking for you. But I know you can take comfort in knowing those homes are the right ones. Look at Mckinley!

Please know you and the kitties are in our thoughts and prayers.

((((((((((((((((((hugs))))))))))))))))))))

Laurie
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilcon View Post
I know how hard it is to let go, MA, but just think of how many precious lives you've been able to save and the joy they'll now bring to the people that adopt them. You'd done a wonderful thing!
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
I know it's hard to let them go, but if you don't, you cannot take in more strays. And if you don't take in those strays, think about the lives & horrible deaths they'll face.
Ditto. Ditto.

What you are doing, MA, is safeguarding twice the number of lives. There are people out there who will give wonderful homes to these kitties you have saved and loved, but who are not equipped, either physically or emotionally, to take on THAT task. That's your task. You're handing on the baton, so you can take on the next challenge, and you will choose well for these little ones you have loved, and then give your energy and your home to another generation of kitties, who haven't yet had anyone to love them. It's never easy to let go a kitty one has loved, but you are doing it for all the best reasons, and everyone wins.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
I went to a place yesterday where someone wanted a barn cat. But when I saw the condition of her cats- I told her I was sorry, but mine would stay right where they are. Her cats had mange, and ear mites, runny noses and crusty eyes. It was really sad.


I lost Cleo this morning. I found him dead outside. There was not a mark on him. Because of this death, I have brought three of my barn cats back inside. So much for having more room! Whatever happened to him happened between 3-4 a.m. because I found him at 5 a.m. and he was still warm. I wanted to open up space in my home, but not this way. His tribute is in the bridge.

I feel like I just lost my best friend. He was 14 1/2 years old when he died.
post #13 of 15
I am so sorry about Cleo MA! I have one 14 year old barn kitty that I just don't know what to do with. And just because they are "barn cats" doesn't mean they don't deserve to be vetted, cared for, & loved!

Play happily over the Rainbow Bridge Cleo!
post #14 of 15
So sorry to hear about Cleo, but what a wonderful age for a barn cat, it shows the love you give to all the cats in your care.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy View Post
I went to a place yesterday where someone wanted a barn cat. But when I saw the condition of her cats- I told her I was sorry, but mine would stay right where they are. Her cats had mange, and ear mites, runny noses and crusty eyes. It was really sad.


I lost Cleo this morning. I found him dead outside. There was not a mark on him. Because of this death, I have brought three of my barn cats back inside. So much for having more room! Whatever happened to him happened between 3-4 a.m. because I found him at 5 a.m. and he was still warm. I wanted to open up space in my home, but not this way. His tribute is in the bridge.

I feel like I just lost my best friend. He was 14 1/2 years old when he died.
I'm sorry MA for the loss of Cleo...may he now be running free across the rainbow bridge in fields of green forever.

Katie
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