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Wow... this is scary..

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've always thought that before elective plastic surgeries that there should be some form of mental health evaluation.

This is odd though... the suicide don't happen until ten years after the implants are done. Anyone have a clue as to why? http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/hea...out607188.html
post #2 of 13
I'm SO not surprised by this study. It has always been my feeling that a lot of women (not all, but probably a majority) who get augmentation do so because they want to "feel better" about themselves or because of industry and/or peer pressure, which to me is indicitive of lower self-esteem.

Those that I personally know IRL that have done it definitely have low self-esteem and crave attention.

Conversely, the women that I have met that have had breast reductions are quite healthy in mind and spirit.
post #3 of 13
Most cosmetic surgery is done due to body dysmorphic syndrome. The person isn't happy with how they look physically, even if there isn't anything physically wrong with the way their look IE: burn scars etc. So they strive for what they deem as "perfection", and never seeing themselves as others see them.

So many people who go in for cosmetic surgery are looking for instant self esteem fixes and a cure for their depression or down outlook on their lives thinking that if they looked different or younger that their lives will be better and more fulfilling. However, over time that is shown to not be the case and they fall back into the same funk. The article explains it pretty well.

Here is an excerp:

Quote:
As to why the risk became statistically significant only later on, Lipworth speculated that, "it's possible that some women who may have had psychiatric illness prior to the implant may experience improvement in psychological functioning in the short term [after implant], but it's not sustained. So, 10 or 20 years out, there may be a recurrence or worsening of psychiatric problems."

Lipworth said the five other studies that also found similar trends were done in five different countries: the United States, Sweden, Denmark, Canada and Finland.

Besides the suicide risk, women with enhanced breasts had higher rates of death from psychiatric disorders, including a threefold increase in deaths caused by alcohol or drug dependence. In all, 38 deaths (about a fifth of the total) in the breast implant group were linked with suicide, psychological problems, or drug or alcohol abuse or dependence, Lipworth said.
And Hollywood's fixation on youth and beauty and the messages that they send out sure isn't helping. Your average Jane tries to keep up with these Hollywood role models in the belief that to be successful you need to have face lifts and bigger boobs etc. Only to find that neither has any improvement on their lives in the long term.

Check out this link and see what I mean about body dysmorphic syndrome. Some of these people have had so many plastic surgeries that they have disfigured themselves and still keep having surgery because they think they think it is making them look good.

Scroll down and click on the long list of articles on the right side.

http://www.awfulplasticsurgery.com/
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post #4 of 13
I'm also not surprised. Elective cosmetic surgery is done because the person isn't happy with how they look. As Betsy said, that is too often due to low self-esteem. They think that getting their breasts or nose or chin or eyes or whatever done will make them feel better about themselves. And it probably does give a relatively short lived sense of euphoria. But it doesn't fix the underlying problem of being happy with yourself.

Obviously that doesn't apply to everyone who gets cosmetic work done. There's a huge difference between repairing an injury or abnormality (medically speaking) and truly cosmetic surgery. And there are those who get it done with their eyes wide open. My sister recently got breast augmentation. She's always been small, but recently lost weight and got into really really good shape (in a healthy way), and lost most of what she had to begin with. She wanted it done so that her clothes fit better - women's clothes are designed to have something there and she didn't fill it out.
post #5 of 13
I'm with Natalie on this. That first paragraph she quoted, particularly:
Quote:
it's possible that some women who may have had psychiatric illness prior to the implant may experience improvement in psychological functioning in the short term [after implant], but it's not sustained. So, 10 or 20 years out, there may be a recurrence or worsening of psychiatric problems."
If you have low self esteem issues that you don't mentally take care of and perhaps you're breasts are "normal" size but you want Cs or DDs. The attention you receive are only focused on your boobs and not you. So in the end, they don't improve your long term self esteem.
post #6 of 13
also most breast implant sugreys have to be redone 10-15 years down the line, i dont know what this would have to do with anything, but dont it seem funny that it is about the time frame that they commit sucide?
and yes i did do a bit of research on this a while ago, not because of self esteam issues, but i wanted to be able to wear anything without having to worry about it holding up lol, but i also found out there are some great bras out their now, so i quickly discarded the implant idea. and can wear nearly anything i want to lol
post #7 of 13
Body dysmorphic syndrome is an incredibly rare disorder. I wouldn't say most cosmetic surgery is done because of that at all. I'd say most cosmetic surgery is done because of vanity, in one form or another.

I also think that the majority of people who undergo cosmetic surgery have self-esteem issues, which is not the same as body dysmorphic syndrome. In order to receive the diagnosis for BDS, the preoccupation with body image must `cause significant distress or impairment in one's occupational or social functioning'. The incidence of this illness is estimated to be only 1% of the population. A far greater number than 1% have cosmetic surgery.

It bothers me that sooooooo many men and women feel that their confidence and self-esteem would be greater and more solid if they looked different. It's sad, but I can definitely understand it. Our society places such a high value on looks that it's almost impossible to quantify. But wherever you go, you are in some way - subtly or overtly - pressured with images that force you to feel inadequate. Even beautiful people feel inadequate much of the time because of this.

If I had really sticky-out ears or a huge crooked nose or massive breasts or anything else quite obvious and that I was embarrassed about, sure, I'd think about cosmetic surgery. I don't have anything like that so I don't know how it would impact my life if I did. I would think that having it fixed would just remove a constant stressor and make me feel more confident. As I'm sure happens in the majority of cases.

I think it's people who go and try to improve things that are already fine but don't live up to some societal standard of beauty, are the ones who could run into trouble later on or even quite soon afterwards. Because for people who undergo cosmetic surgery for these reasons, they will never be satisfied, because the surgery is just a band-aid for a deeper, more profound problem. I agree wholeheartedly that in these cases underlying psychiatric illness has a role.
post #8 of 13
i would think that anyone who had cosmetic surgery, cause they want to look better to the other sex, would have self-esteem issues.

I had need some cosmetic surgery, after losing weight, i have alot of excess skin, well not alot, but it drives me nuts it needs to go. But really dont care what anyone else thinks, i am not out to impress anyone.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Body dysmorphic syndrome is an incredibly rare disorder. I wouldn't say most cosmetic surgery is done because of that at all. I'd say most cosmetic surgery is done because of vanity, in one form or another.

I also think that the majority of people who undergo cosmetic surgery have self-esteem issues, which is not the same as body dysmorphic syndrome. In order to receive the diagnosis for BDS, the preoccupation with body image must `cause significant distress or impairment in one's occupational or social functioning'. The incidence of this illness is estimated to be only 1% of the population. A far greater number than 1% have cosmetic surgery.

It bothers me that sooooooo many men and women feel that their confidence and self-esteem would be greater and more solid if they looked different. It's sad, but I can definitely understand it. Our society places such a high value on looks that it's almost impossible to quantify. But wherever you go, you are in some way - subtly or overtly - pressured with images that force you to feel inadequate. Even beautiful people feel inadequate much of the time because of this.

If I had really sticky-out ears or a huge crooked nose or massive breasts or anything else quite obvious and that I was embarrassed about, sure, I'd think about cosmetic surgery. I don't have anything like that so I don't know how it would impact my life if I did. I would think that having it fixed would just remove a constant stressor and make me feel more confident. As I'm sure happens in the majority of cases.

I think it's people who go and try to improve things that are already fine but don't live up to some societal standard of beauty, are the ones who could run into trouble later on or even quite soon afterwards. Because for people who undergo cosmetic surgery for these reasons, they will never be satisfied, because the surgery is just a band-aid for a deeper, more profound problem. I agree wholeheartedly that in these cases underlying psychiatric illness has a role.
Great post as usual
When I worked in a hospital where they did lots of implants, they were usually
people who thought it was going to change their lives. They couldn't see that changing the outside doesn't alter who you are: and I would say the ten year suicide thing is because most of them were so thick it took them ten years to realise that they were still the same boring self obsessed person.
post #10 of 13
Interesting... thanks for sharing this.
post #11 of 13
I think in Hollywood cosmetic surgery is the only way some of these women can continue to work because they are competing with young, beautiful "girls". If that's what they need to do in order to get a job to put food on the table, then I don't see a problem at all. I do, however, hate to see the ones that take it too far (Joan Rivers, Priscilla Presley are 2 good examples).

When I was in my late teens and early twenties I had an awesome body, 36/22/35. After marriage and bc pills I lost my bosom. I always found my clothes didn't look as nice as they used to and it bothered me so when our daughter was 3 I had breast implants. I felt great again with how I looked. 22 years later I developed a problem with one of the implants so last year I had them re-done. If I had to go back and do it again, I'd do it in a heartbeat. I think it's very important to find a good surgeon however.

I've never had self-esteem issues so I can only speak for myself, but I'm sure lots of folks that do the implants have such issues.
post #12 of 13
Linda, what you said sounds so much like my sister. I think the biggest thing for both of you, the thing that makes your choice a healthy choice, is that you both did it for YOU. You didn't want breast enhancements to look better for your husbands or other men. You didn't do it to be more attractive to someone else. You did it to feel better about how you look in your daily lives - for you and if it made a difference to others then that's just a bonus.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I think in Hollywood cosmetic surgery is the only way some of these women can continue to work because they are competing with young, beautiful "girls". If that's what they need to do in order to get a job to put food on the table, then I don't see a problem at all. I do, however, hate to see the ones that take it too far (Joan Rivers, Priscilla Presley are 2 good examples).

When I was in my late teens and early twenties I had an awesome body, 36/22/35. After marriage and bc pills I lost my bosom. I always found my clothes didn't look as nice as they used to and it bothered me so when our daughter was 3 I had breast implants. I felt great again with how I looked. 22 years later I developed a problem with one of the implants so last year I had them re-done. If I had to go back and do it again, I'd do it in a heartbeat. I think it's very important to find a good surgeon however.

I've never had self-esteem issues so I can only speak for myself, but I'm sure lots of folks that do the implants have such issues.
That's a great post. I would feel the same about cosmetic surgery in such an instance. I never had any breasts (despite my mother and grandmother having GIANT ones!) until I married the wrong man, was miserable and ate myself 65lb heavier. Then they got big and heavy and dropped. I've lost a lot of weight but they don't look like they used to! I would have a mastopexy (breast lift) to address that, but I want to wait and see what further dieting and exercise does first. AND I could live without one. It's not the focus of my life.

For women and men where body image IS the focus of their life then cosmetic surgery (I think) can be a dangerous road to follow. The reasons behind the focus would need to be fully examined before I would be happy about performing surgery on people like this. But it's hard for surgeons. Ethical, decent surgeons who would require a psychological assessment first would never get any business. People who wanted a quick fix would just go to the next surgeon down the line who will do it for them and no questions asked. It's a difficult situation, and certainly there are a lot of layers to be considered.
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