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Religious questions....

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Okay, I realize that I have some questions about Islam, and it's components. I in no way mean for this thread to be offensive, but I'm just curious. Here we go!

1. Can Imams be married?

2. In moderate practice, are women and men separated at the mosque?


Also, if anyone else has any questions regarding any religion please ask them. I'd be happy to clear up anything about the Catholic Church or being a Neo-Pagan.
post #2 of 27
This has the potential to be a really good thread, but it also could be a minefield, so could I please ask us all right now, before anyone responds, to keep it to trying to shed light where others have questions. No judgements, OK? Thanks, all.
post #3 of 27
Would this site help you out?

http://www.understanding-islam.com/
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
Okay, I realize that I have some questions about Islam, and it's components. I in no way mean for this thread to be offensive, but I'm just curious. Here we go!

1. Can Imams be married?

2. In moderate practice, are women and men separated at the mosque?


Also, if anyone else has any questions regarding any religion please ask them. I'd be happy to clear up anything about the Catholic Church or being a Neo-Pagan.
I know of some old stories of Imam's from years to centuries ago having wives, but I don't know if that has changed or not. As for the worship services of moderates, I don't know. I work with a moderate Muslim, I can ask him tomorrow if I manage to remember it
post #5 of 27
Yes Imams can be married and no matter what the women and men are always separated in the mosque for those who practice Islam moderately or extreme.
post #6 of 27
And in Islam cats are blessed and are allowed in the mosque but dogs are not.
post #7 of 27
The university I went to was very liberal, and it had a Muslim prayer room. There were two entrances to the room (one for men and one for women) but I believe they all used the same room.
I'm not sure if that would be done at a mosque however.
post #8 of 27
They will pray in the same room but always separate. If there is only one room, the women will pray behind the men, not with them. And if there is a way to put up a divider in that same room that is preferred.

The reason women are separated because of how they pray a man would have a hard time keeping his concentration on prayer with women/woman continually kneeling in prayer in front of him. So women are always behind and never pray 'with'.
post #9 of 27
Goodness me. That is just so typically male, isn't it? I would have a hard time praying if there were a whole lot of bent-over butts in front of me, too. I find it so repellant that sexual desire and need in men is condoned, supported and encouraged in some religions, and yet in women it is quashed, diminished and in the case of Islam, criminalised much of the time.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
Also, if anyone else has any questions regarding any religion please ask them. I'd be happy to clear up anything about the Catholic Church or being a Neo-Pagan.
How do you classify Neo-paganism? What do you practice? I have yet to find two pagans who believe or practice the same way, which is a good thing in my mind
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pami View Post
And in Islam cats are blessed and are allowed in the mosque but dogs are not.
Wow! See, cats know they are blessed!
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
Okay, I realize that I have some questions about Islam, and it's components. I in no way mean for this thread to be offensive, but I'm just curious. Here we go!

1. Can Imams be married?

2. In moderate practice, are women and men separated at the mosque?


Also, if anyone else has any questions regarding any religion please ask them. I'd be happy to clear up anything about the Catholic Church or being a Neo-Pagan.
yes they can be, at least Itta;s cousin who is a Imam is married,.
and yes normaly they are separtated, But i have seen some that did not.
It seems to me it is done according to how the Imam of that mosque does it.


and yep i have also seen it done the way pami says.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Goodness me. That is just so typically male, isn't it? I would have a hard time praying if there were a whole lot of bent-over butts in front of me.
yep see that is why they keep them apart jsut for that that reason. lol
no staring at butts allowed heheeh,
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie1965 View Post
How do you classify Neo-paganism? What do you practice? I have yet to find two pagans who believe or practice the same way, which is a good thing in my mind
Ahhh... the love of being a Pagan. I believe that we are all connected from the smallest microbe up to being human. Within this connection there is and energy, and the best way to describe this is a soul. When we die this energy goes back into the universe.

Casting a spell is like praying, one is asking for positive energy to aid someone else.

Some believe in a Goddess like energy that is all knowing and all loving. I, however, believe that God/Goddess has no gender.

I hope that gives you the cliff notes version of what I believe.


Also I really want than anyone who answered my questions about Islam. I've always been curious, but I've never felt comfortable walking up to a person and asking!

EDIT: There is the concept of Maiden, Mother, and Crone I'd also like to add. They are the three stages of life for a woman. Maiden is the stage of youth. She is often questioning and can be slightly demanding. Mother is the creation stage. Now this doesn't mean that a woman has to physically have a child, but one can not pass onto the next with out creating something. Examples of this can be: writing a book, running a business, making a home for herself and her partner, or anything else that makes something out of nothing. The Crone is the woman that lives with both her Maiden and her Mother in harmony. She is able to know the answer to some of her question and live with her creation. Each stage has an important ritual.
post #15 of 27
So what exactly does Neo Paganism believe in?? Gods and Goddess, such as mythical times of Zeus, and Aphrodite??

I'm very interested,, I only know a little about a few religions.
post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelkitty View Post
So what exactly does Neo Paganism believe in?? Gods and Goddess, such as mythical times of Zeus, and Aphrodite??

I'm very interested,, I only know a little about a few religions.
Well... I can tell you what I believe. That doesn't include all Pagans. The joy of being a Pagan is that you can show up for a ritual and watch people practice different things.

We don't have a hard line of doctrine to follow, but we do follow this: Above all harm none.

Also: What ever you put out in the universe you will get back three times.

Those are the underlying themes in every ritual and ceremony.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelkitty View Post
So what exactly does Neo Paganism believe in?? Gods and Goddess, such as mythical times of Zeus, and Aphrodite??

I'm very interested,, I only know a little about a few religions.
Pagan is simply a word derived from the latin Pagunus, meaning 'rural' or 'rustic'. So paganism encompasses a wide range of beliefs which are typical of older rural societies that depend upon the land and the seasons a great deal - most forms of paganism involve a reverence of nature and rituals to mark the turning of the seasons, an important thing to early agricultural societies with no clocks and calenders, where observance of rituals in step with length of daylight hours and moon cyles helps to mark when to plough, sow, and harvest.

So neo-pagans can have a very wide range of beliefs depending upon what is important to them personally. Obviously most modern pagans are not dependent upon having to remember the right time of the year to start sowing crops, but observance of seasonal changes, lunar-cycles, and a respect of nature is a general basis for most modern pagan beliefs. This may or may not involve belief in god/goddess, multiple deities, personification of the different aspects of nature, or asking for blessings/spellcasting, but these are not seen as essential parts of modern paganism and are dependent upon the individual. Some people do revere the old deities such as the Greek, Norse, Celtic, or Egyptian pantheon, and some have a particular affection or reverence for one particular god/goddess/spiritual embodiment, but that is by no means universal, and strictly following a particular ancient belief system (ie. observance of ancient Greek rituals in order to worship Greek deities) is not that common.
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epona View Post
Pagan is simply a word derived from the latin Pagunus, meaning 'rural' or 'rustic'. So paganism encompasses a wide range of beliefs which are typical of older rural societies that depend upon the land and the seasons a great deal - most forms of paganism involve a reverence of nature and rituals to mark the turning of the seasons, an important thing to early agricultural societies with no clocks and calenders, where observance of rituals in step with length of daylight hours and moon cyles helps to mark when to plough, sow, and harvest.

So neo-pagans can have a very wide range of beliefs depending upon what is important to them personally. Obviously most modern pagans are not dependent upon having to remember the right time of the year to start sowing crops, but observance of seasonal changes, lunar-cycles, and a respect of nature is a general basis for most modern pagan beliefs. This may or may not involve belief in god/goddess, multiple deities, personification of the different aspects of nature, or asking for blessings/spellcasting, but these are not seen as essential parts of modern paganism and are dependent upon the individual. Some people do revere the old deities such as the Greek, Norse, Celtic, or Egyptian pantheon, and some have a particular affection or reverence for one particular god/goddess/spiritual embodiment, but that is by no means universal, and strictly following a particular ancient belief system (ie. observance of ancient Greek rituals in order to worship Greek deities) is not that common.
You said that so much better than I could. Thank you.

Have you ever had the "I showed up for ritual and everyone is sky-clad and I don't have enough sun screen so I want to go home" moment? Or is that just me?
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
Some believe in a Goddess like energy that is all knowing and all loving. I, however, believe that God/Goddess has no gender.

.
I can’t answer your original questions. Maybe this site can: http://www.islam101.com/religions/index.htm or this one
http://www.islamicity.com/education/...lamandmuslims/
But wanted to comment, the part I quoted you on, the concept, is Islam somewhat. They have a word for God, Allah, which doesn't denote male or female human status. That word has no gender. Personally I find that more appropriate for the concept of God, however, I am not a Muslim.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post

Also: What ever you put out in the universe you will get back three times.

.
That sounds like the concept Karma, which is Buddhism I believe. Also sounds like the concept in Buddhism not to harm any living thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post

We don't have a hard line of doctrine to follow, but we do follow this: Above all harm none.

.
That sounds like the concept in Christianity, not to harm others.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
and yet in women it is quashed, diminished and in the case of Islam, criminalised much of the time.
Ah - here a misconception. Please, please do not confuse religion with culture as most people are wont to do. Islam does not criminalise women, in fact, women are what's the word - hmmm held to a different level. It is the Arabic CULTURE that criminalises women, not the religion per se.
post #22 of 27
To answer the original questions:

1. Can Imams be married? Yes

2. In moderate practice, are women and men separated at the mosque?

Same mosque, different sections, irrespective of which practice.

Feel free to ask me any questions you like! I am a practicing Muslim who went to a Church of England boarding school!
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pami View Post
And in Islam cats are blessed and are allowed in the mosque but dogs are not.
That is cool!
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abymummy View Post
To answer the original questions:

1. Can Imams be married? Yes

2. In moderate practice, are women and men separated at the mosque?

Same mosque, different sections, irrespective of which practice.

Feel free to ask me any questions you like! I am a practicing Muslim who went to a Church of England boarding school!
Thank you!

My next question is what is a Muslim wedding like?
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingglass View Post
My next question is what is a Muslim wedding like?
first to marry itta, i had to pretend to be muslim(just to make her happy)
ashadu allah illa haillallah wa'ashadu anna muhhamad darasul alla.

depends more on where you hold it. (speaking for indo style, Abymummy,or someone from the middle east ma be different)

you have to ask the family, if you can marry her. and this can be a very big deal, as you maybe have to prove you can take care of her.

she on the other hand meet your family, in a effort to get to know her,

these are left from the old days before people would date i guess

normaly the wedding will be in the morning, normaly at the brides house.
with just very small family group, maybe a few friends,but not many.

a person call a modin(imam) does it. you accept the marrige of xxx with the mas kawin

mas kawin = the gift you give to the women. gold in the old days. or what ever (which in the old days would be like money that is hers, that she keeps in case the marraige break up, if i remember that part right)

which is unfair really, what do i get for marrying her,, gee

any, the only real muslim part for us was a imam did it, the rest was all local.
to the cultrual , and no i wont post pics, lol

but we did it thailand cause mix marraiges of faith are not allowed in indo.
and for a couple of other reasons.

was kinda like this http://users.skynet.be/sky86158/inhoud.htm

yep we did sit not stand.
and no i did not wear a dress, but i did wear a jacket*black and silver that was very much like that with western style pants and sandles.(and yea, i had to wear a funny hat) lasts about a hour, i was so busy being hot, that i kinda was in a daze hehe.

no comes the really really really painful part, the part after which we did in Indo how the wedding is small the party could very fast get of hand, If itta would have gotten her way there would have been at least 1000 people there, i swear they run around inviting people they dont even know.
for me this was the painful part as i am not a social person, i dont like people talking to me that i dont know. i got lost outside as fast as i could

anyway i missed something i am sure Adilah will correct me.
at least i hope she does, cause i am sure i am missing lots of info

if you want more info , you can look here also http://www.expat.or.id/info/weddings.html#links
post #26 of 27
Actually Bruce, you got it more or less correct. 90% of what he wrote was cultural, the 10% (what the Imam did) is correct. But he did miss out quite a bit.

Women are actually NOT required in the wedding ceremony, however consent must be given by the woman to marry.

The actual "I do's" are done by men only, the Imam, the groom, the Bride's father (or brother or uncle if the father is unavailable) and the witnesses. The "speech" or the "I do" is a phrase that states "I hereby do take so and so to wife with a Mas Kawin of ____". The phraseology must be correct before it can be accepted by the men present. It took my brother 4 goes to get it right since my SIL has an extremely long name.

Now, before you say that this is unfair to the woman, I will state that you must understand the "rules of engagement" so to speak. The relative that represents the woman in effect DOES represent the woman. A father is expected to care for his female child until the day he dies or until she is married. If she is still unmarried at the time of the father's death then the sons MUST care for her (irrespective of age and wealth or job - like my brother and I) until her death.

Most cultures as in Malaysia, Indonesia etc. have modified this simple ceremony to suit their needs. The basics remain the same. Both members must be Muslim or Children of the Book.

And just to finish -

"Ashadu allah illa ha ill lallah, wa 'ash hadu anna Muhammad darra sul lallah" means "There is no god, but GOD, and Muhammad is his prophet".

ETA: What you see on TV is 90% culture and 10% religion - please remember that!
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abymummy View Post
Actually Bruce, you got it more or less correct. 90% of what he wrote was cultural, the 10% (what the Imam did) is correct. But he did miss out quite a bit.

Women are actually NOT required in the wedding ceremony, however consent must be given by the woman to marry.

The actual "I do's" are done by men only, the Imam, the groom, the Bride's father (or brother or uncle if the father is unavailable) and the witnesses. The "speech" or the "I do" is a phrase that states "I hereby do take so and so to wife with a Mas Kawin of ____". The phraseology must be correct before it can be accepted by the men present. It took my brother 4 goes to get it right since my SIL has an extremely long name.

Now, before you say that this is unfair to the woman, I will state that you must understand the "rules of engagement" so to speak. The relative that represents the woman in effect DOES represent the woman. A father is expected to care for his female child until the day he dies or until she is married. If she is still unmarried at the time of the father's death then the sons MUST care for her (irrespective of age and wealth or job - like my brother and I) until her death.

Most cultures as in Malaysia, Indonesia etc. have modified this simple ceremony to suit their needs. The basics remain the same. Both members must be Muslim or Children of the Book.

And just to finish -

"Ashadu allah illa ha ill lallah, wa 'ash hadu anna Muhammad darra sul lallah" means "There is no god, but GOD, and Muhammad is his prophet".

ETA: What you see on TV is 90% culture and 10% religion - please remember that!
That sounds really interesting, and it also sounds like a very beautiful ceremony.

My SIL is Hindu, and her wedding was an amazing sight to behold. It was three hours and had an intermission so people can go get something to eat.
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