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How to assure maximum growth

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm getting a Maine Coon kitten soon. A male that is not neutered. I have a contract with the breeder to have the kitten neutered at 7 or 8 months. I want to see this cat reach it's full size potential. The cat will be 16 weeks old or so when I receive it. What can I do to assure this cat reaches it's maximum size (not fat) potential?
post #2 of 18
Good quality food and plenty of exercise. Are you planning on showing this kitten? If so, since its a larger breed, see if the breeder will allow up to a year before neutering unless he's spraying earlier. For showing, the males need to get the full width of the head.

Charlie was neutered at 3 months old and he might not get the wider head of a male that has not been neutered. Hopefully it will broaden some more, but there's not guarentee. He's got the body, just that his head is not as wide like his unneutered nephew (same age - almost a year for them).
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
He'll be a pet. not for show. So, it appears I need to delay neutering as long as possible, feed him the best and get him as much exercise as possible. No supplements that might work?
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
What might you suggest as adequate exercise? It's just me and the cat, and I have a job. He'll be strictly an indoor cat too.
post #5 of 18
Qualtiy kitten food ... ask the breeder what they feed and research the food ... SOme breeders know alot about food and feeding and others dont.... Maine coons grow for 3-5 yrs so likely kitten food till 18 months to 24 months
post #6 of 18
Personally, I kind of think genetics has a lot to do with it. I have a larger breed as well, who was neutered at 12 weeks, and he still has the very wide head and cheeks. He gets good quality food, and is pretty large (13 pounds) at 1 year 4 months.
post #7 of 18
I have two Maine Coons and they were both neutered at 9 months. One is 18lbs and the other is 17lbs. They both have very large heads (and huge paws). Size has a lot to do with genetics, maybe find out what size the parents are and that should give you an idea of where kitty will end up. Just keep in mind that if you delay neutering too long they can start to spray
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
No No! I don't want a male cat spraying the apartment. So, you're cats weren't spraying at 9 months? I'm afraid the breeder would be quite upset with me if I waited that long to neuter the little guy.
post #9 of 18
The local Maine Coon breeder, cattery named Felis Wonder (now fairly famous since his cats did very well in the show rings last season) neuters at 5-6 months and frankly, I see no difference in size/length in his cats - neutered or entire. True enough Coons are a slow maturing breed but honestly, from what I can see from his coons, early neutering makes no difference at all!
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abymummy View Post
True enough Coons are a slow maturing breed but honestly, from what I can see from his coons, early neutering makes no difference at all!
I've read a study that says early neutered cats grow larger than later neutered. Will find it and post the link.

http://www.cfa.org/articles/health/early-neuter.html

Quote:
The kittens were divided into three groups:

* Group 1 (11 kittens) were neutered or spayed at 7 weeks of age.
* Group 2 (11 kittens) were neutered or spayed at 7 months.
* Group 3 (the control group of 9 kittens) were not neutered until maturity and after the completion of the first phase of the study at 12 months.

There was no difference observed in the growth rates in all three groups, although the males grew faster in all groups.
Increased long bone length was observed in both males and females in Groups 1 and 2. This appeared to be due to the fact that physeal closing (closure of the bone growth plate) was delayed in Groups 1 & 2.
This explains why cats neutered and spayed as kittens are frequently larger (longer and taller) than unaltered cats or cats altered later in life. This seems to be particularly true for males.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
After reading the entire article I will neuter this little cat as soon as I get it. Although I'm a little concerned about putting him through that so soon after I receive him. I don't want him to think I'm a bad guy. Setting him up for surgery and the resulting recovery phase while he still might be getting to know me concerns me a little.

Might there be any supplements? And this issue of exercise; he'll be indoors all the time, with just me to play with him after work. How do I assure he gets enough exercise?
post #12 of 18
In my experience, neutering is a pretty simple procedure. Especially the younger they are. Most kittens do an awful lot of running around - even the laid back types like my Smudge. What food do you plan on feeding? If it's pretty good quality, you might not need supplements.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta View Post
In my experience, neutering is a pretty simple procedure. Especially the younger they are. Most kittens do an awful lot of running around - even the laid back types like my Smudge. What food do you plan on feeding? If it's pretty good quality, you might not need supplements.
My last neuter was in 1990 and it was quick and easy ... he was 4-5 months

If feeding quality food SUPPLEMENTS should NOT be needed unless there is a specific medical issue
post #14 of 18
As long as they are in good health and fed high quality food they should grow to their full potential. I have a 7 month old male maine coon who was a runt and very tiny compared to his siblings. He is now almost 11 1/2 pounds. He eats wet and dry (Innova, and NB) and was neutered at 6 months. I also have a female coon who just turned 6 months and is being spayed later this week. She weighs almost 8 pounds but her parents are not as large as my male's parents are. She eats only dry right now (Nutro NC) because I haven't found a wet that agrees with her tummy yet.
post #15 of 18
Go to www.Naturapet.com for food ideas or you can do raw/barf too.
Just ask Sharky all about it first.
post #16 of 18
As embarrassing as it is to admit my cats started spraying after they got fixed. No problems before though.
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
I will probably free feed dry food. I've done that with several animals in the past without any issues. I still haven't picked a brand to use, but I'm leaning towards Blue Buffalo.

Spraying after neutering?! I thought that was one of the main reasons to get a male cat fixed. So there is a chance the cat will still spray after neutering? That ain't good!
post #18 of 18
MOST males who are fixed DONT spray but yes there are exceptions to every rule..

Blue spa is good BUT quite grain heavy .... = CARB heavy
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