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A new excuse to abuse children

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070715/D8QD02LO0.html



***Sigh***
post #2 of 29
sad, but not new, it was just there sad excuse for not doing there job.
post #3 of 29
Video game addiction? Puh-LEEZE! I am sick and tired of the "its not my fault, I have a disease" whine. These two are just immature, selfish idiots. Besides, if they're SOOO addicted to gaming, how did they pull themselves away long enough to get pregnant - TWICE??
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e View Post
Besides, if they're SOOO addicted to gaming, how did they pull themselves away long enough to get pregnant - TWICE??
well you know for some, sex does not take that long.........
there can be a couple of min, of wait in que to get in the game
post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e View Post
Video game addiction? Puh-LEEZE! I am sick and tired of the "its not my fault, I have a disease" whine. These two are just immature, selfish idiots. Besides, if they're SOOO addicted to gaming, how did they pull themselves away long enough to get pregnant - TWICE??
Well, all kinds of addicts do get pregnant all the time! This is akin to a gambling addiction or a drug addiction but I am not in the camp that considers addiction a disease so I think you hit the nail on the head there!
post #6 of 29
I do consider addiction a disease-- it changes your brain chemistry to the point where you are actually dependent on something; heroin, caffeine, nicotine. Every new study into it reveals that there are reasons that people get addicted, including that being likely to get addicted to things is determined by the structure of your brain.

But video games are not heroin. I don't believe that you can become chemically dependent on vdieo games-- it's a compulsion, just like sex 'addiction' or gambling 'addiction'. Maybe they do have an actual problem, but there is nothing to prevent them from TRYING to stop their compulsion and seeking help. Perhaps having this compulsion isn't their fault, but allowing it to take over their lives to the point where their children are almost dead is completely their fault. They obviously don't care about them, so why not give them up for adoption?
post #7 of 29
It's just another excuse. When people neglect their kids, they find any number of things to be doing instead of taking care of the little ones.

It's sad that these children weren't born to someone who doesn't have kids, and really wants them.
post #8 of 29
I love playing video games, but I will not play when my son is home alone with me - only if his dad is there, or if I am alone. It is not fair on him if I ignore him and play games for ages.

I think it is just an excuse. Stupid people.
post #9 of 29
That's unbelievable to me. What mother could pay more attention to a video game than her babies??
post #10 of 29
I'm surprised that it was D&D and not Warcraft. THAT game is disgustingly addictive.

Poor kids. =(
post #11 of 29
That's so sad. I can't believe how some people treat their kids.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
But video games are not heroin. I don't believe that you can become chemically dependent on vdieo games-- it's a compulsion, just like sex 'addiction' or gambling 'addiction'. Maybe they do have an actual problem, but there is nothing to prevent them from TRYING to stop their compulsion and seeking help. Perhaps having this compulsion isn't their fault, but allowing it to take over their lives to the point where their children are almost dead is completely their fault. They obviously don't care about them, so why not give them up for adoption?

i agree with that.
post #13 of 29
I think its like chain-smoking, but the 'hit' is 6 hours of dungeons and dragons. If it makes them happy, and they feel low, and unable to go without it, then they are addicted. TBH if they are able to play dungeons and dragons for that long, they Must have problem. How they let themselves get into that state is another matter.
post #14 of 29
Okay, yes. But people who have ever actually been addicted to something can tell you it is a way different experience than impulse control problems, or a compulsion to play video games, or just an excuse to be totally rotten parents.

You feel low without playing video games... why didn't they play with their children? Get out of the house?

I'm just sick of people cheapening addiction like this. You can DIE trying to get off heroin or alcohol. Not just throw a tantrum because you aren't playing your video games.
post #15 of 29
lol sorry there is nothing anyone can do to convice me that gaming is a addiction.
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
I agree, it is just an excuse, people are full of excuses for their unacceptable behavior.
post #17 of 29
I don't consider video games an addiction, like many other have said. Addiction is something that clicks in your head and you wind up physically suffering from it. I have yet to see someone have a panic attack from not playing WoW.

As a former gamer I have to say that its VERY EASY to lose track of time, especially in a game you enjoy. I could have 10 clocks, including the computer clock sitting in front of me, but 5 hours seems like 20 minutes, so even though I think I'm destressing for 20 minutes after getting home, the next thing I know its midnight.
post #18 of 29
post #19 of 29
Speaking as a gamer girl, I can completely attest to the fact that while you're playing, you can lose track of time. For me, it's not the online games that get me (because I eventually lose interest), but games like Sims 2 where I'm building houses and so focused that I don't notice how much time has gone past. That being said, I may lose track of time, but I never lose track of what my kitties are doing, and they're a lot less helpless than human children! (Honestly, though, I defy anybody to "lose track" of Spike when he's hungry or wants to be loved on. He can be very demanding. )

Most of my close friends are gamers (of various sorts -- live action, online, tabletop ... we're a giant pack of geeks!), and many of them have small children. One couple has two separate computers and two separate World of Warcraft accounts, and yet their sixteen-month-old daughter has yet to suffer from deprivation, because she's their top priority, not their gaming. The only time both of them get to play at the same time is when their daughter is sleeping (and one of them has a baby monitor), when she's in the room with one of them (she likes to "help" them play), or when she's visiting her grandparents. Another couple has a newborn, two computers, and a variety of video game "addictions," and lo and behold, their son isn't starving either. He's just much more important (and let's face it, much more interesting) than their gaming. I think all of my friends consider themselves "addicted" to their gaming, but none of them place their so-called addictions above their children (or their fur-children).
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e View Post

I read this on another forum and some of the posters were mad that the woman's name was posted as she may be mentally ill. Most likely high on something.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
I read this on another forum and some of the posters were mad that the woman's name was posted as she may be mentally ill. Most likely high on something.
She's an admitted druggie and the child had already been taken away from her. Arrest reports are public records.

So far, this year, Tucson has had three children murdered by their parents and a couple of days ago, a baby was killed by the mother's boyfriend. I'm getting more and more disgusted with people.

Back when my son was doing meth, my DIL refused to let him have unsupervised access to the twins and I backed her, wholeheartedly. Thankfully, Mark has cleaned up his act and their family is back together.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
I do consider addiction a disease-- it changes your brain chemistry to the point where you are actually dependent on something; heroin, caffeine, nicotine. Every new study into it reveals that there are reasons that people get addicted, including that being likely to get addicted to things is determined by the structure of your brain.

But video games are not heroin. I don't believe that you can become chemically dependent on vdieo games-- it's a compulsion, just like sex 'addiction' or gambling 'addiction'. Maybe they do have an actual problem, but there is nothing to prevent them from TRYING to stop their compulsion and seeking help. Perhaps having this compulsion isn't their fault, but allowing it to take over their lives to the point where their children are almost dead is completely their fault. They obviously don't care about them, so why not give them up for adoption?

Actually this is not entirely true. I am a recovering shopaholic. Over the years and many threapy sessions later I learned that no mater what the addiction, from drugs to shopping to gambleiing to sex the human brain realeases the same chemicals. Even after a heroin addict gets clean their brain will still on occasion realease certain chemicals. Also sex realeses chemicals in your brain that are powerful enough to kill, that is why afterwards you feel euphoric and realaxed. While I don't know for sure about video games I do know that people do realese things like adrenilan and enorphins even while playing a game. Adrenialine is actually more addicting than herion. I know because I have gotten a higher rush from shopping than I did when I havd a coke problem. Both of which almost ruined my life. Its been 5 years since I have gotten my shopping under control and I am still paying for it in many ways. My credit is shot, my DH now has full control of the money and I have to basicly not be left alone with money and a store of any kind around. At my worst I would go days with out being able to buy food but I did have a new pair of shoes. It really can be a problem. Its just as bad as drugs. Without outside help I could not stop. I was and will for ever be addicted to that feeling.

Now I do feel bad for the children just the same as if the parents were drug addicts but I can see how it could happen.
post #23 of 29
Karma's Mom--

I don't disagree that these things are problems, compulsions, and mental health issues. I didn't say that it wasn't real, that they made it up as an excuse. Not long ago it was called "compulsive shopping" or "compulsive gaming" which I believe is a much more suitable title-- it says that it is a true problem, a compulsion (in the APA usage), etc.

But drugs like heroin, even nicotine, actually change the way your brain functions. Your nervous system loses its ability to function without whatever drug it is that has replaced your normal neurotransmitters. This is not true with non-chemical dependencies. I think mainly this is a disagreement about what 'addiction' really means. Yes, these activities release serotonin, norepinephrine, adrenaline, etc. But those are already present in your body. Gaming does not chemically replace one of your neurotransmitters.

I guess my definition of addiction requires a real chemical dependency, yours does not-- not really a huge difference, I suppose.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
Karma's Mom--

I don't disagree that these things are problems, compulsions, and mental health issues. I didn't say that it wasn't real, that they made it up as an excuse. Not long ago it was called "compulsive shopping" or "compulsive gaming" which I believe is a much more suitable title-- it says that it is a true problem, a compulsion (in the APA usage), etc.
i agree with that.
there is a difference between a compulsion, and needing a drug fix.
post #25 of 29
Adreniline is one of the most powerful drugs on the planet, and our bodies produce it naturally. It was actually easier for me to quite cocain than it was to stop my shopping habit. Once the chemical dependency was gone all I had to work on was the mental desirer o have it. Now I can be around people who are doing cocain, it has happened at parties and I am able to walk away, but the rush I felt from shopping was the same rush I get out of rock climbing, my heart starts to race, I get out of breath, excited and just have the need to spend, I fight it all day every day. Believe me there is no greater rush in the world.

True you can die from the chemical dependency on drugs but they alter your brain in a different way. I have been on both sides of the issue and for me the addiction to shopping is way more powerful than the desire to get back in to drugs. As fun as the drugs were I enjoy the way my body feels when I get the rush ob buying something no matter how expensve and what I have to do to get it.

Its basicly the reason why some people are addicted to doing extream sports. Adrenilan can be and is the most powerful drug. It can be used to stop a heart and it can be used to start a heart. Hospitals use it all the time.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
I do consider addiction a disease-- it changes your brain chemistry to the point where you are actually dependent on something; heroin, caffeine, nicotine. Every new study into it reveals that there are reasons that people get addicted, including that being likely to get addicted to things is determined by the structure of your brain.
For me, personally, it's how it's quantified and depends largely on semantics.
As an addict myself, I will not accept the 'medicalization' of drug addiction, thus putting it in the same arena as my mother's terminal DISEASE of lung cancer. It's both personal and political for me.
To me, one is clearly a choice and medicalization undermines that idea.
(again, it's just personal).
post #27 of 29
Jeesh. I am a believer in gaming addiction and I'm pretty close to being addicted to the Internet, but I cannot imagine anything that would be more addicting than my own sweet baby.

But then, alcoholics and drug addicts neglect their children all the time. I guess it's the same with any addiction. It's all-consuming. It's sad, not that we are coming up with new excuses as a society to find things to blame, but that our advancement as a society is providing us with new things to exploit our weaknesses.

There is always a small proportion of the population who are going to become addicted to something, whether it be heroin, alcohol, gambling or cigarettes. Just because it seems alien to us, this doesn't give us the right to dismiss things like gaming or internet addiction as not possible. We have not experienced it - we cannot dismiss it so readily. Evidently, there are people for whom the Internet is a genuine pathological addiction. For some people, sex is. For some people, it's shopping. For some people it might be picking their nose.

Where there are human beings, there is potential. Anything is possible and the fact remains that children die every day because of these addictions. Rather than arguing whether or not they're real, perhaps we should look into treatment or better still, prevention.
post #28 of 29
My siblings and I were severely neglected and violently abused. My parents are "pillars of the community." They don't drink or do other drugs, they don't smoke or play video games, they don't even gamble. In fact, they have no vices at all that I or anybody else can see.

Addictions put people in a state that is not in their right minds. The drug(s) alter their brains and their bodies physically crave it. This can be a reason for neglect. Even so, there are some people who are able to fight off the drug cravings for the sake of their kids.

In other cases, neglect is a direct result of the parents being narcissists. They are putting themselves first. If they prefer to socialize, play golf, work, or play video games, it makes no difference. These are excuses, not reasons.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampWitch View Post
My siblings and I were severely neglected and violently abused. My parents are "pillars of the community." They don't drink or do other drugs, they don't smoke or play video games, they don't even gamble. In fact, they have no vices at all that I or anybody else can see.

Addictions put people in a state that is not in their right minds. The drug(s) alter their brains and their bodies physically crave it. This can be a reason for neglect. Even so, there are some people who are able to fight off the drug cravings for the sake of their kids.

In other cases, neglect is a direct result of the parents being narcissists. They are putting themselves first. If they prefer to socialize, play golf, work, or play video games, it makes no difference. These are excuses, not reasons.
that is a very good answer..
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