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no more vaccines for us

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
My 15 month old Sphynx, Molly, had his yearly vaccination on Monday. I have decided that this will be the last one he has. He is totally an indoor cat and always will be. He had such a horrible reaction to the vaccine. Since Monday he has not been his usual self at all. He seems depressed and lethargic, but luckily is still eating and drinking normally. I know he could have had a much more severe reaction, but it was bad enough for me to decide that 'enough is enough'. I hope I get my little monkey boy back soon ~ I feel so bad for him and I am missing his wicked personality
post #2 of 21
I'm sorry to hear that Molly isn't feeling well after his vaccination. I know some cats do react to them. Did you tell the vet how Molly reacted? That should be in his medical records as it may indicate an allergy to some types of medications.

I hope Molly is feeling better soon. Healing vibes to Molly and hugs to both of you.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice Jean44 . I did give Molly's vet a call just to have it on record that he had a bad reaction to the vaccine. My poor little monkey boy
post #4 of 21
aw im sorry to hear that, i have 1 cat who can not have his injections due to bad reactions, so his strickly indoors only.
post #5 of 21
I'm wondering whether yearly vaccinations are really necessary. My little girl cat also reacts badly to vaccines. Then, I also read that vaccines may be linked to cancer. Since my cats stay indoors, the only reason I think they need to be vaccinated would be for when I take them to the vet. Isn't that ironic? The only time they're at risk of getting really sick may be when they go to the doctor and are exposed to sick cats! And it does seem like they always catch a cold when they go there.

Any experts want to weigh in on the vaccine issue?
post #6 of 21
I actually didn't discuss this with our vet last Saturday when Bijou had his checkup, but the vet only gave him the Purevax rabies shot - no other vaccinations so I assumed (yes, I know I should have asked) that he doesn't feel the need for yearly vaccinations.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
that he doesn't feel the need for yearly vaccinations.
Neither do my vets. My indoor only adult Sphynx will not receive more vacc's. She had her kitten vacc's and a rabies.
post #8 of 21
I have had strictly indoor cats all my life and I have yet to get all their vaccines. If we go anywhere the only one we would board would be Moo because she needs her asthma meds daily and it is a bit tricky getting them into her, so she needs vaccines otherwise she can't go to the kennel. But the others I don't vaccinate because it doesn't seem necessary, and our vet said it ok if they are kept indoors.So if your kitty feels nasty after I wouldn't bother with vaccines.
post #9 of 21
The American Association of Feline Practitioners has published "new" (2006) vaccination protocols....the document is here
http://www.aafponline.org/resources/...ines_JAVMA.pdf

More info here http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.ph...em=vaccination
including this very interesting paragraph:
"Immunologically, annual boosters are totally unnecessary for the vast majority of animals. The way the immune system works, a vaccine does not suddenly lose its effectiveness a year and a day after the last shot, although some veterinarians imply that being even a tiny bit late for a booster is putting your animal at grave risk. It’s just not true. If a vaccine produces adequate antibodies, and those antibodies are still in the blood the following year, they will actually inactivate the booster, making it worthless as a protector, and potentially a danger. Additional vaccine doses in an immunized animal do not increase or improve the immunity, but they do increase the risks."

It's not enough to just ask your Vet about the necessity of vaccinations........Vets run businesses...read that again: Vets run businesses. Unless you're in a stupor, you will recognize a potential for a huge conflict of interest where it comes to Vets providing advice in this matter. Fewer annual "shots" = less annual profit. That is indisputable. Many Vets also fear that, if clients don't believe that annual "shots" are necessary, they won't bring the animal in for (even) a yearly checkup. There is probably some truth in that....a result of misinformation, poor education and understanding in pet parents.

Individually, we need to get smarter. Many of us, as a result of the recent food recalls, came to realize that we cannot blindly trust the pet food Establishment any longer. Sadly, many of us still do (many of us believe that all pet foods are now safe!) We MUST take responsibility for learning as much as we can about our pets' health and nutrition needs, and then take our rightful place in making informed decisions (yes, in consultation with our Vets).

Blind trust in "professionals"? Continue at your fur kids' peril.
post #10 of 21
There appears to be new, good news about the decrease in frequency of occurrence of Vaccine-Associated Sarcomas. From a Veterinarian's blog:
http://www.dolittler.com/index.cfm/2...sarcoma.7.2.07

(This topic may provide another opportunity for some of us pet parents to educate ourselves about where, on a cat's body, any vaccine should and shound NOT be injected...another "word to the wise"...and caring.)
post #11 of 21
This is a very interesting thread as I got two kittens yesterday (they're half Bengal - look out for pics shortly)

I too thought that if a cat is kept indoors they are safe from viruses. Wrong!!! Many germs and viruses are airborne, hence my beautiful Lucy has had two severe attacks of cat flu which nearly cost her her life. At the moment she is under the vet (again) because she started sneezing the other day. She often does sneeze (it's something she's always done) but because of her age I decided not to take any chances so she's on antibiotics for a week just to make sure. After that I am getting her vaccinated.

Because your cat's an indoor cat he probably wouldn't need the FelV part of the vaccine - just the FHP part. That is what Lucy will get, only the FHP part as because she doesn't get out, she is not really at risk of contracting FeLV.

The kittens will be vaccinated too in a fortnight's time when they're 9 weeks old. They've had to be taken from their Mum a bit on the early side because of medical problems with Mum. They will be seeing my vet on Monday for their kitten check, worm preparation etc. They will get the whole vaccine as, although they are going to be mainly indoor cats, I am going to train them to walk on a harness and lead.

There is more than one vaccine available, different ingredients but does the same job and the newer vaccines are much safer. A bit like many humans are allergic to penicillin so are given alternatives (I'm one of those people - penicillin could kill me).

I've seen what cat flu can do to indoor cats. Frankly, it's horrible. I think it would be best to discuss alternative vaccines with your vet. I really hope Molly is back to his usual self very soon.

Just as an aside, many humans have bad reactions to vaccines too but these usually only last a few days to a week.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Python View Post
This is a very interesting thread as I got two kittens yesterday (they're half Bengal - look out for pics shortly)

I too thought that if a cat is kept indoors they are safe from viruses. Wrong!!! Many germs and viruses are airborne, hence my beautiful Lucy has had two severe attacks of cat flu which nearly cost her her life. At the moment she is under the vet (again) because she started sneezing the other day. She often does sneeze (it's something she's always done) but because of her age I decided not to take any chances so she's on antibiotics for a week just to make sure. After that I am getting her vaccinated.

Because your cat's an indoor cat he probably wouldn't need the FelV part of the vaccine - just the FHP part. That is what Lucy will get, only the FHP part as because she doesn't get out, she is not really at risk of contracting FeLV.

The kittens will be vaccinated too in a fortnight's time when they're 9 weeks old. They've had to be taken from their Mum a bit on the early side because of medical problems with Mum. They will be seeing my vet on Monday for their kitten check, worm preparation etc. They will get the whole vaccine as, although they are going to be mainly indoor cats, I am going to train them to walk on a harness and lead.

There is more than one vaccine available, different ingredients but does the same job and the newer vaccines are much safer. A bit like many humans are allergic to penicillin so are given alternatives (I'm one of those people - penicillin could kill me).

I've seen what cat flu can do to indoor cats. Frankly, it's horrible. I think it would be best to discuss alternative vaccines with your vet. I really hope Molly is back to his usual self very soon.

Just as an aside, many humans have bad reactions to vaccines too but these usually only last a few days to a week.
Thank you for posting this. I just came back from a traveling vet who gives shots at discounted prices. He is a really good vet but I overheard a lady talking about how her cats are indoors and do they really need a rabies shot. I had never heard about it.

Since I will be traveling across several states, I decided to just get Precious all her shots that were loooong overdue. She is strictly an indoors cat BUT we go outside once in a great while (on her leash only) to get some fresh air. I figured if I got her caught up with her shots, I won't be hassled about bringing my cat across state borders....not that anyone would necissarily stop me seeing that I have a cat but...better safe than sorry!

My vet told me it is normal for a cat to act lethargic especially after receiving multiple shots at one time. Mine came home, didn't want any treats and just lounged around and wouldn't move much. Now, she is napping. I figure keep an eye out on her for the first 24 hrs after any shot and if she is still lethargic and if she doesn't eat or drink THEN take her back to a vet......
post #13 of 21
I no longer get yearly vaccinations because Pippin has severe allergic reactions to them. For each of his kitten shots he had to get a shot of prednisone and a round of amoxil. It was horrible to see him so sickly at such a young age. He has too many health issues that I won't put him through that.
You should always make sure your cat is in good health before a vacc. They need all their resources available in case they do have a bad reaction.
I have to say that the vet was very proactive in that the final kitten vacc he gave he also gave the pred at the same time and sent me home with antibiotics and Pippin had no bad reaction that time because of the preventative.

Devlyn
post #14 of 21
I am gonna go against a whole lot of opinion here... but I do all vaccines. That does NOT mean blindly allowing the vet to do whatever vaccines. I had abad vet tell me my indoor-only cat should get the FeLV vax and I never went back to him.

But, vaccines have a large benefit. My parents both had polio, and I have a huge appreciation for exactly what vax can prevent. Vaccines have their drawbacks, and you must weigh them against the benefits. For most of us, especially with indoor cats, the bare minimum is enough.

That includes, to me, the rabies shot (our new vet does Purevax as well) and the distemper, etc shot.

I remember many of my vaccines as a child making me feel icky for a while, but compared to what those diseases could have done, I'll take the vax any day.

No, vaccines are not perfect. But quite a few horrifc diseases have been eradicated because of them. Smallpox anyone? It is important to educate yourself well and decide what is best for your pets, but it seems many times that people forget the collective benefit of vaccines and forgo them at the risk of both their own cats and everyone elses'.

That said, I do hope Molly feels much better soon. If he is allergic to vaccines, he would be one of the cases where the cons outweigh the pros.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zissou'sMom View Post
I am gonna go against a whole lot of opinion here... but I do all vaccines. That does NOT mean blindly allowing the vet to do whatever vaccines. I had abad vet tell me my indoor-only cat should get the FeLV vax and I never went back to him.

But, vaccines have a large benefit. My parents both had polio, and I have a huge appreciation for exactly what vax can prevent. Vaccines have their drawbacks, and you must weigh them against the benefits. For most of us, especially with indoor cats, the bare minimum is enough.

That includes, to me, the rabies shot (our new vet does Purevax as well) and the distemper, etc shot.

I remember many of my vaccines as a child making me feel icky for a while, but compared to what those diseases could have done, I'll take the vax any day.

No, vaccines are not perfect. But quite a few horrifc diseases have been eradicated because of them. Smallpox anyone? It is important to educate yourself well and decide what is best for your pets, but it seems many times that people forget the collective benefit of vaccines and forgo them at the risk of both their own cats and everyone elses'.

That said, I do hope Molly feels much better soon. If he is allergic to vaccines, he would be one of the cases where the cons outweigh the pros.
I guess I was a bit confusing in my earlier post. I also definitely believe in vaccinations even if the cat is indoor only. I just don't think they are necessary every year. I get the rabies shot every year since it is a requirement in our area, but the other shots I feel comfortable getting only once every 2-3 years.

I too believe we can bring all kinds of things in on our clothing, things that are airborne to our kitties and it's our responsibility to ensure they are safe and that includes getting vaccinations.

I just volunteered at our local humane society so I definitely want our cats to be safe just in case I should bring some disease home.
post #16 of 21
Hello, I just read your post. I too do not get my indoor cats vaccinated anymore. i believe it may cause cancer. and some vets believe the shot should be given not near the neck I believe toward the back by the legs.
post #17 of 21
Well its been said that you should get them every 3 yrs. And yes a lot will not take them in for a yearly visit (me included) - I've had cats a long time and unless they are sick (have enough experience to tell for the most part) they will not see a vet every year.

It worked out great this year as all of them (dog/cats) will go for their shots and rabies and then will not go unless really sick till 2010. I had to double check on Charlie as I wanted to know if he should have shots this year cause in December 06 he got the kitten shots. So he will be on the same 3 yr cycle as the other two.

Just have to mark their folders that they are due in 2010.
post #18 of 21
Ours get 3yr vaccs.
I would abstain from them completely except for the rabies vacc, but MIL runs a rescue out of her home and fosters as well.
Since we do go over there and she comes over here (occasionally bringing me a sphynx baby to drool over), it is in the best interest of my kits to keep them up to date.
post #19 of 21
Before I adopted my cats 3 years ago, I called the vet to see how much vaccinations cost. He told me that they should get their first round that kittens usually get and then he said that in his opinion, as long as the cats are indoors all the time, they don't need vaccinations every year unless they come in contact with (or you adopt) another pet. I was quite impressed because as someone said, the vets are business people so he didn't have to tell me that at all. I haven't taken my cats to the vet since they got their first vaccinations 3 years ago.
post #20 of 21
I believe in keeping my kitties up to date with their rabies and 3-in-1 vaccines. The 3-in-1 lasts 3 years, and the rabies is yearly. I know you can get 3 year rabies now, but given that we'll be heading back to Australia (which is rabies free) with the kitties sometime in the future, we're happy to keep getting the rabies yearly.

Edit: and yes, it is normal for a kitty to be lethargic after their vaccinations, but I believe it shouldn't last more than a day or so. If it does, then definitely contact your vet!!!
post #21 of 21
I say do what is required and you and your vet are comfortable with,....

I used to vaccinate yrly and give the whole group... then I read and the vet read the latest research and my then conventional vet said every three yrs..... that was 4 yrs ago ... I moved vets to a holistic minded and she said every three yrs is protocal but she wont push shot s past the baby series and booster... She advises against vaccinations for animals over 10 ... my Zoey had a bad reaction to two shots at once so shell get rabies and maybe a three in one after titers if needed separated by a few weeks
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