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I'm sorry sir, your pants aren't manly enough

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Part of this made me laugh. Part of this made me want to cry.

IMO if an air traffic controller wants to come into work wearing a feather boa and an evening gown I don't really care as long as my plane stays in the sky.

http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaind...420.xml&coll=2
post #2 of 21
OMG can you believe some people.

Not to hijack this thread, but yesterday morning I was sitting in my car outside the Select Sandwich shop and this man passed by my car wearing capri pants. I can't tell you how bad capri pants look on a man, especially with hairy legs. Ewwwwww. My eyes snapped open really big, the lower jaw dropped almost to my chest and I nearly choked on my coffee.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
OMG can you believe some people.

Not to hijack this thread, but yesterday morning I was sitting in my car outside the Select Sandwich shop and this man passed by my car wearing capri pants. I can't tell you how bad capri pants look on a man, especially with hairy legs. Ewwwwww. My eyes snapped open really big, the lower jaw dropped almost to my chest and I nearly choked on my coffee.
That would have been a great moment. A man in Capri pants give me faith that there really is a God and he has a great sense of humor.
post #4 of 21
Hm...well I guess as long as they didn't start dressing like your summer interns that you described, it's all good
post #5 of 21
I can understand a dress code, that requires maintaining a sense of professionalism but, I don't think that the COLOR of the pants should matter. Aquamarine might be a nice change, from the run-of-the-mill khaki that seems to be standard "business casual" these days. On "jeans days" I wear purple, lavender or red ones.

On a side note: until recently, we had a male manager, who worked in full drag and I work with several lesbians who wear dress shirts and ties to work.
post #6 of 21
Oh, for crying out loud. I guess an overtired controller wearing "manly" colors is acceptable then.
post #7 of 21
What I want to know is what kind of work do they do (I always thought it was manual labor) and can they teach me the best way to do that in a dress, lol. I have a hard enough time trying to figure out the best way to sit.
post #8 of 21
I applaud the men who took the dress code requirements to mean that they can wear dresses.

Where in the world does the FAA get the idea to enforce that kind of dress code? Some dress code, fine. You don't want your neighbor to have pants so low you can see his crack. (I've worked at a place with no dress code before, and that actually happened. The new dress code was basically to not dress slovenly, ie: don't be stupid. Shirts, jeans, and flip-flops were perfectly acceptable and even expected by our clients.)

What the FAA is doing is actually discriminatory though, in a whole host of ways. Worse still that it's a government agency.

It's not going to last, especially if they actually fire people. I'd expect controllers are hard to come by, and it sounds like they know it. If not, they wouldn't have come up with all their antics once the dress code came out. They know that it's bogus and are calling the FAA's bluff.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bab-ush-niik View Post
I applaud the men who took the dress code requirements to mean that they can wear dresses.

Where in the world does the FAA get the idea to enforce that kind of dress code? Some dress code, fine. You don't want your neighbor to have pants so low you can see his crack. (I've worked at a place with no dress code before, and that actually happened. The new dress code was basically to not dress slovenly, ie: don't be stupid. Shirts, jeans, and flip-flops were perfectly acceptable and even expected by our clients.)

What the FAA is doing is actually discriminatory though, in a whole host of ways. Worse still that it's a government agency.

It's not going to last, especially if they actually fire people. I'd expect controllers are hard to come by, and it sounds like they know it. If not, they wouldn't have come up with all their antics once the dress code came out. They know that it's bogus and are calling the FAA's bluff.
OK - just have to add my 2 cents. I am one of the folks that believe in dress codes only because some people have no sense of appropriate dress for a place of business. Some females will wear short short dresses, low cut tops and look very "unprofessional" which does not send a good message to clients coming in to do serious business.

My daughter (27 yrs. old) actually made a comment on just this very thing tonight. She mentioned going to a salsa dance club last night where the older crowd was in one side of the building and the younger crowd in the other side (2 separate rooms). She went into the older crowd side and mentioned how well-dressed and how classy they looked. She said the younger crowd girls were wearing tube tops as skirts and looked very "slutty" - her words not mine. So yes, I do believe in a place of business people should be forced to dress appropriately if they don't have the good sense to do so on their own.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunasmom View Post
Hm...well I guess as long as they didn't start dressing like your summer interns that you described, it's all good
LOL!!!!!!! That is really funny. We have interns too, and they are just a hoot!
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
this man passed by my car wearing capri pants. I can't tell you how bad capri pants look on a man, especially with hairy legs. Ewwwwww. My eyes snapped open really big, the lower jaw dropped almost to my chest and I nearly choked on my coffee.
Last time we were in NZ, we saw lots of men wearing capri style pants. DH and I were quite surprised and didn't think the look would take off in North America. It is funny when you first see it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I am one of the folks that believe in dress codes only because some people have no sense of appropriate dress for a place of business. Some females will wear short short dresses, low cut tops and look very "unprofessional" which does not send a good message to clients coming in to do serious business.
So yes, I do believe in a place of business people should be forced to dress appropriately if they don't have the good sense to do so on their own.
I agree in a "sensible" dress code, for the sake of everyone in the office as well as clients. The thing is for these controllers, no-one ever sees them. The public never comes into contact with them, so dressing to create an appearance of professionalism really isn't an issue here. Sounds like a whole lot of BS is going on with the FAA and the union, and the dress code situation is more of a stand-off between them. I think they have more important things to worry about, like "how tired are these people" and "is that plane gonna crash?".
post #12 of 21
I think if you're not public facing, dress codes should at lest be "relaxed".

And for air traffic controllers, they should be able to wear whatever they're comfortable in! If they're more comfortable wearing a pair of jeans, t-shirt and comfy shoes, rather than a stuffy pair of pants, sticky shirt and uncomfortable shoes then why not??

My old job the dress code was pretty much jeans and nothing too revealing/crude on top. It was much better not to have to dress up each day, to wear comfortable clothing, and not have to buy a new wardrobe just for work.
post #13 of 21
Dress codes certainly have their place, when the employee is meeting the public. After all, the employee is the "face" of the company, and the company has every right to define what that "face" should look like.

Where there isn't a particular need to define the company's "face", it can still be useful to have a dress code that defines minimum standards of decency, so that those who have some sense about such things are not grossed out by those who don't. That's a workplace atmosphere issue.

A workplace that is not open to the public and in which the employee is engaged in duties that require his whole undistracted attention should not need more than a minimum standard of decency defined. The employee's comfort should be most important, so long as it is within the bounds of decency.

Demanding "professional" dress of air traffic controllers is just being picky for the sake of being picky. They can come to work in a potato sack for all I care, as long as they keep the planes safe.
post #14 of 21
I agree with others here who have said that dress codes in the workplace are a good idea for both staff and clients. Particularly clients. My girlfriends and I went to a restaurant recently, where one of the waitresses had her boobs out like you would not believe. It was a pretty casual restaurant and she looked very nice - all in black, hair back etc. But her breasts just popped out in your face and wobbled around when she walked. It's not that they weren't very nice breasts - they were! But there were heaps of children in this restaurant and even if there weren't, I just don't think that's appropriate at all. None of us are prudes and quite frequently wear booby tops when we go out partying - but at work? We were all quite shocked and a little offended.

In an office situation, it's the same thing. You're at work, people, not at home or at the pub. A bit of decorum doesn't hurt. But as long as you look neat and tidy and you are dressed decently it shouldn't matter what you choose to wear.

I wouldn't wear my `rocknroll' t-shirt to work, partly because I work in a hospital but also because it's not appropriate, really. But when I worked in radio I definitely would have worn it. We didn't really have clients coming in and besides, it's radio.

We have a uniform at my work which is very nice, very comfortable, and really looks good when we all wear it. But we have a charity day every month and we can wear whatever we want. We pay some money to do so towards a nominated charity and we take it in turns to choose the charity. Our practice manager just has one rule for free dress days - `The Three Bs', she calls it - no boobs, no bums and no bellies. And fair enough, too!
post #15 of 21
For the past several years, I've worked in call centers and the dress code is usually casual: jeans, non-offensive T-shirts, not-too-short shorts or skirts.

Currently, we are allowed to wear jeans only on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and on specially designated days. Spaghetti straps,strapless tops, flip flops, skirts more than 3" above the knee are no-nos at ALL times. I've noticed a difference in the level of professionalism, in this job, as opposed to those with a more casual dress code. At my current job, we seem to be more polite and have fewer disciplinary problems.
post #16 of 21
IMO if you work in a place that you don't come in contact with the general public very often it should not be a strict dress code - but be appropriate

If you are around the public, you should be dressed more to present a good appearance. For example; receptionist in a high class hotel should have a more dressed appearance - not blue jeans and a tank top.

If you work in a tattoo parlor then you could get away with blue jeans and tank top (and probably you have a lot of tattoos also)
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
IMO if you work in a place that you don't come in contact with the general public very often it should not be a strict dress code - but be appropriate



If you work in a tattoo parlor then you could get away with blue jeans and tank top (and probably you have a lot of tattoos also)
Back in my cocktail waitress/bartending days, jeans and T-shirts were acceptable. My first cocktail job's dress code was denim hotpants and red shirts.

Even not facing the public, one should dress appropriately. Call centers are usually outsourcers and clients/potential clients frequently tour the facility. If a potential client sees a bunch of sloppy/slutty employees, they're not inclined to bring their business to us.
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e View Post
Back in my cocktail waitress/bartending days, jeans and T-shirts were acceptable. My first cocktail job's dress code was denim hotpants and red shirts.

Even not facing the public, one should dress appropriately. Call centers are usually outsourcers and clients/potential clients frequently tour the facility. If a potential client sees a bunch of sloppy/slutty employees, they're not inclined to bring their business to us.
Where I work we had a Japanese investment group come through, and they were shocked by the fact that we could wear whatever we wanted. You could see the cultural wheels turning in their heads. They did invest, but they also sent an intern to work with us to get a better feel on how we did things.

I think that having a basic dress code is important. My main concern with the article is that it was being enforced from an incorrect perspective. He did fall in line with the code, but someone was made to feel that that specific color wasn't manly enough.
post #19 of 21
oh wow...so while they're critiquing the clothing on one anothers crotches- who is watching the planes
post #20 of 21
As far as dress codes go, I don't like most of them. I've had bad experiences with dress codes. Take my graduation for instance. It was one of the most uncomfortable days of my highschool career I've ever known. Why? Because all the girls in my class had to wear white gowns while the boys got to wear green. Now, this means that the boys had to wear nice pants, shirt, and tie. Fair enough right, cause they can wear any color they like and as long as thier shoes were nice, they were set. The girls however, arg! I hated it. Because our graduation gowns were white, we had to wear white underneath. So, my family jumped on this as a way to make me more feminine. They put me in an uncomfortable, ugly in my opinion white dress and heels. I was so mad that I had to wear white. I own a whopping 2 white shirts. White is not my color. But I was forced to wear something very uncomfortable on a day that was supposed to make me happy.

On the other hand, dress codes are not always that bad. At work we have a semi-relaxed dress code. Even when working with customers, you don't have to be polished and shined for work. In the cafe we are required to wear close toed shoes, for safety reasons, a black or white shirt with a collar, and black or white pants/skirts. Also, you are allowed to have visable tattoos and piercings. I myself had an eyebrow piercing and now have only my industrial. No one has anything bad to say about tattoos or piercings there. At least 1/3 of our employees have tattoos or piercings. The customers don't seem to care, unless they are the stuck up prudes, but the managers don't listen to them.

With the aquamarine pants. Seriously, if it makes him happy, whats the problem. He's not offending anyone by wearing bright pants. Maybe he's trying to cheer everyone up by being colorful. If you are not dealing with clients or customers, then I don't think a strict dress code should apply to you. Definatly do not show excessive skin or have anything crude on your clothing, but as long as thats kept in mind, wear what makes you comfortable. You'll be more relaxed and happier and able to keep your mind on what you should be doing and not "Wow, my feet really hurt from these shoes."
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by emrldsky View Post
What I want to know is what kind of work do they do (I always thought it was manual labor) and can they teach me the best way to do that in a dress, lol. I have a hard enough time trying to figure out the best way to sit.
Air-traffic controllers are the people in the tower coordinating flights - making sure planes don't crash into each other.

I think rigid dress codes for these people are silly. Whatever keeps them happy works for me
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