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Introductions when there is no spare room?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
How do i make cat introductions when i dont have a spare room??

I took in the two Birmans, one is 5 yrs the other 6. I have them in the from room still in the oversized dog carrier together. they have Hissed at prue and the kittens, but are fine with tigger. Im jsut kinda letting them smell each other though the kennel right now , but need some help for later on , when i gotta let em out to go potty and eat. Thanks!!!
post #2 of 25
Thread Starter 
i have gotten them into the great dane sized dog kennel, with food, water and a litterbox. do you think this would be ok for a few days for them to get to know my guys?

I put vanilla under the chins of ALL cats, hopin that will help. I would get some Feliway, but after getting a carrier, there new food, and things, im broke again,lol
post #3 of 25
I guess I must be really old and strange, but what did anyone do when bringing in a new cat before they had kennels and many rooms and Feliway? We always just threw in the new ones (unless they were little kittens, and then only kept them out of it for a few wks) and watched the fur fly, or hisses erupt and within 10 days (more or less) they were all getting along, if not perfectly, then 'o.k.'. I wouldn't do it if the adults weren't neutered, of someone had just had kittens, and not if I wasn't around to monitor things, but I find that separation just prolongs everything and doesn't achieve a lot. Have toys around that everyone can play with, enough boxes for all, catnip for distraction (works wonders sometimes... getting stoned with strangers tends to make them friends fast :-), separate feeding 'stations' and proper mealtimes, and plenty of landing places (pillows, etc.). If one cat is obviously much larger and/or stronger and a bully, continue giving equal attn. to all, but don't allow them to actually beat up on others.
post #4 of 25
I did that with the two that I have now because I didn't know I was supposed to do it any other way. They weren't adults though. The resident cat was 6 months old and the newcomer two months. I guess I got lucky, they got along from the beginning and were already playing that evening.
post #5 of 25
i use a large dog crate to introduce new cats. it's to protect me, as well as the new cat and my existing cats. i only use the crate for 24 hours and then open the gate. Whatever happens after that I'm prepared for... meaning I'm there watching, have gloves, a blanket, goggles and my bullet-proof vest on :-). See, you can't know what's going to happen. Cats are unpredictable. Hissing, running, hiding, etc., is normal. I agree that it takes about 10 days to really get an idea whether the cats will learn to like or at least tolerate each other. I do not believe in putting a new cat in a separate room. That's only going to make things worse.
post #6 of 25
I go about things much the way Larke described. I've always skipped the formalities. I think the set up you have now with the dog crate is sufficient.
post #7 of 25
bean, i for the most part argree with larke too. so much has been published and although it's great information, it seems to me a lot of it has been misunderstood and misused....
post #8 of 25
I would let them start exploring birmans are usually extremly laid back great calm cats and will fit right in within a matter of days, I doubht u will have to many issues unless one of your older cats is extremly dominant
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
They seem fine with the kittens, but for some reason, Prue makes them made, and they try to smack each other though the kennel doors. Prue got it good though, and got a tuft of hair removed from her head when she got close and started a spat,lol. im not interfering, cause there caged, and not really gonna be able to hurt each other, and i know they have to try to get to know each other.

Anything else i can do to help ease things along?
post #10 of 25
A tuft of hair in a scuffle between separate areas is not good! This is overly aggressive and you need to prevent any further physical aggression. Even if you have a bathroom with a door, intervals of a few hours with the newbie in the bathroom, food, water, litter, them being able to smell each other under the door is best at this point. Free for all is good in he wild, but not when there is expectations of your home. A large carrier will often be sufficient, but if there is physical wounds or marks, this is not a good sign....
post #11 of 25
I know this sounds bad but when I would leave for work I would put the kitten in the bathroom and let the dominant cat roam the apartment... I feel it was cruel since our old bathroom was tiny (only a tub and toilet, no room for the sink... the sink was outside the bathroom, hotel style). I really had no other choice, i lived in a one bedroom apartment and if I closed the bedroom door or living room door the dominant cat he would scratch the life out of the doors (we weren't suppose to have cats because they have claws, we snuck them into our old place). My poor kitty cried, luckily she only had to do it for two days while I was away at work. I think the dominant cat's heart went out to her for being couped away, because he was no longer hostile. Now I have a much bigger apartment, so if I ever adopt another kitty, I have options.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixie23 View Post
I know this sounds bad but when I would leave for work I would put the kitten in the bathroom and let the dominant cat roam the apartment... I feel it was cruel since our old bathroom was tiny (only a tub and toilet, no room for the sink... the sink was outside the bathroom, hotel style). I really had no other choice, i lived in a one bedroom apartment and if I closed the bedroom door or living room door the dominant cat he would scratch the life out of the doors (we weren't suppose to have cats because they have claws, we snuck them into our old place). My poor kitty cried, luckily she only had to do it for two days while I was away at work. I think the dominant cat's heart went out to her for being couped away, because he was no longer hostile. Now I have a much bigger apartment, so if I ever adopt another kitty, I have options.
It doesn't sound bad or cruel at all......What you were doing was looking out for the best interest of all, 2 days is transitional, and your bathroom was probably larger then a dog crate. The fact that you were aware of the kittens well being, as well as the home cats, says you were looking out for the best interest of all. I always think of Maia's best interest, stray kitty, doggy, friend visiting with, sitting, Maia's happiness and importance is the top of my list as well as what is best for the temporary guest ( even people!)!
post #13 of 25
Well thank you. I felt mean because the bathroom wasn't even 8x8. It was the perfect decision, because after one day of being confined my dominant cat chilled out a bit, because he was able to approach her scent and sound on his own terms... A less intense introduction I must say.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixie23 View Post
Well thank you. I felt mean because the bathroom wasn't even 8x8. It was the perfect decision, because after one day of being confined my dominant cat chilled out a bit, because he was able to approach her scent and sound on his own terms... A less intense introduction I must say.
I do not recommend shutting your cat in a room for the sole reason that your existing cats have already claimed that space as their own. While it may seem to you the cats are "less intense" after a few hours, things can change very quickly once you let the new cat go. the existing cats will likely immediately go for the bathroom and possibly even "mark" it by peeing. they will then seek the new cat, who likely ran for the nearest bed to hide under, where he/she will stay for days.
post #15 of 25
Sorry but in my case you are VERY wrong. My cat was becoming hostile to my new kitten because she was an invasion in his territory. My older cat has been a solo cat for about 4 years until rather recently. He is 16 pounds and at the time she was 4... Sorry there was no way I was going to go to work and let my older cat traumatize the kitten. Neither of my cats have ever gone outside of the box, they dont bite, and are beyond well behaved so your theory is mere opinion. If you read articles on how to introduce new cats i did exactly what I was suppose to. My kitten was very timid and feral, there was no way I was going to let a fierce interaction keep going. 2 full days in the bathroom and my older cat welcomed her no problems. He needed to approach her scent and sound on his own terms, not have it thrown in his face. Both were more calm and less stressed this way..

You should read up on it:

http://www.thecatsite.com/Behavior/4...cing-Cats.html

BTW my older cat did not claim the bathroom as his own, therefor he had no problem with the kitten being in there, he claimed the living room, kitchen, and bedroom. That is why she was in the bathroom, since he dominated every other room.

Just to let you know, your theory on how cats will react was totally false by all means. They became very cuddly, playful, loving, and friendly with eachother. My cats actually share ONE liter box (they had two) and the refuse to have it anyother way. So there are no bathroom issues or territorial marking and never has been.
post #16 of 25
Oh yeah and my kitten was only in the bathroom for two days and only 8 hours. Im sorry but I wasnt letting my kitten out around my older cat without supervision, so if something went down when I was at work I wouldn't have been able to protect her. As for crates you are just stressing them by containing both and putting them face to face, seriously.

Oh and finally it wasnt like she was in a jail cell being in the bathroom... She had her liter box, food, water, toys, bed, and a small scratching post to leep her occupied all day. I dont think that is cruel at all. I know my cats, things would have gotten out of hand if I wouldnt have seperated them... I didnt the first day and wished I would have (was a weekend and I was home). She hid the whole time until after the bathroom scenario, after that she roamed all over, never hiding.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixie23 View Post
Oh yeah and my kitten was only in the bathroom for two days and only 8 hours. Im sorry but I wasnt letting my kitten out around my older cat without supervision, so if something went down when I was at work I wouldn't have been able to protect her. As for crates you are just stressing them by containing both and putting them face to face, seriously.

Oh and finally it wasnt like she was in a jail cell being in the bathroom... She had her liter box, food, water, toys, bed, and a small scratching post to leep her occupied all day. I dont think that is cruel at all. I know my cats, things would have gotten out of hand if I wouldnt have seperated them... I didnt the first day and wished I would have (was a weekend and I was home). She hid the whole time until after the bathroom scenario, after that she roamed all over, never hiding.
trixie, i am sorry for upsetting you. i never said you were "cruel". my advice was based on my own experience and i was just trying to help. however, after reading your last two posts, i am more worried about you than the cats. what is your problem? if everything is going so great, why did you post a question in the first place?
post #18 of 25
This isn't my post... I didnt post this question if you look at the top of the page. I simply replied to this post to state the method I used, saying some might think it was bad soley because my bathroom was small. I didnt ask any question in this post, so I dont know why you would be worried about me.

I have no problem, I just feel that you came at me (by quoting my response)solicitating the idea that cats will mark territory and encounter bahavior problems if they are gradually introduced through the seperation theory, all I stated was that isnt a fact but a mere opinion because my cats are fine. It is a highly recommended procedure through thecatsite and the humane society to list a few.

I think you are confused by my responses to this post, they are not a question but a statement of how the procedure turned out, there is a difference. Please dont turn this around into me having some personal issues by my defending a highly effective and useful method. I never said that your method doesnt work, I did however state that it seems to be stressful putting two cats face to face in seperate cages (which is still a form of seperation btw) and this was MY opinion. I have no problem, so no need to treat me like Im special ed, I am just very passionate about my kitties and found your opinion to be just that, opinion.... which you are more than entitled to. Im not looking to bicker I was stating my opinion which is fair, just as you were able to state yours. However I will not tolerate the personal attack about you being worried about me as a person, misunderstanding that I posted no such question, and doubting that what I said above was truth (if everything is going so great why did you post? comment). Sorry I'm not playing that game. I respect your opinion and decided to respond, not expecting that you would respond in such a manner.

Finally I wasnt upset(maybe a little now that you seem to think I have personal issues, which you dont even know me) I was just being passionate with my opinion, I am a passionate person. my oh yeah comments werent meant to be snooty or sarcastic, i just say oh yeah whenever I forgot to say something and decided to add it on. Sorry if you took offense. This is a cyber conversation, I wasnt angry, but how would anyone know because we cant hear the tones in eachothers voices, see expression, etc. So if it got taken out of context all I can do is apologize. If you still think I have "personal issues" well I dont know what else to tell you.
post #19 of 25
trixie, all i meant was that by keeping a cat (especially a feral cat) isolated in a room usually doesn't work. when you let that cat out, most of the time they will still be very fearful, and therefore still dangerous. using a wire cage works better because the cats not only can smell each other, but they can see each other too. a lot of cat communication is done through their eyes. also, with the use of a large wire cage, you can put the cat in a room with you. i put mine right in the center of my living room. this allows me to observe how the cats interact and also allows the new cat to become familiar with me and the noises (such as a TV) that otherwise they have never experienced before.
post #20 of 25
Maybe that is so. Nollee was caged with other animals for the one month that she was up for adoption before I got her. She had no issue interacting with other cats, my older cat however, was very aggressive and violent towards her (not the normal introduction behavior). It was for his sake and her safety that I did it. I wouldnt ever spend the money on two metal crates just for a 24 hour period introduction, i dont have that expendable of an income for such a method. My method worked, yours probably does too. I dont think what I did was wrong... I didnt want to come home to a wounded and dead kitten that I let roam free without supervision while I was at work, instead I let her stay in the bathroom 8 hours for two days and then she was let out from the time I got home till the time I went to work the next day. Not to mention she spent at least a whole month in a cage with her adoption agency (barely being let out) and I refused to do it to her again, instead I let her have a bigger bathroom, the situation was less stressful on both of my cats. I tried the eye to eye method with the kitten in her carrier (when I brought her home for a few hours) and the dominant cat to roam free... It wasnt effective in my situation. Everybody does things differently I guess and I am going to leave it at that now. I dont feel the need to defend myself anymore because I know how good I am to my cats and how happy they are... With no behavioral problems whatsoever... So I must of done something right!
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by feral65 View Post
I do not recommend shutting your cat in a room for the sole reason that your existing cats have already claimed that space as their own. While it may seem to you the cats are "less intense" after a few hours, things can change very quickly once you let the new cat go. the existing cats will likely immediately go for the bathroom and possibly even "mark" it by peeing. they will then seek the new cat, who likely ran for the nearest bed to hide under, where he/she will stay for days.
It seems you have had unusual experiences. This is not the norm when separating cats during introductions.


Trixie, you handled the introduction very well. As most of us here at TCS will agree, it is best to do gradual introductions. When Mika came into our life she was easily 1/2 the size of Bijou and for us to leave them together unsupervised would have been more cruel on our part IMO. We did a very slow introduction (4 weeks) with supervised time together before ever leaving them together alone.
post #22 of 25
Thank you. Im not trying to say Im right, maybe the other method works but I noticed my cats where more stressed face to face then they were when I used that method. Heck I got really lucky that they took to each other after 3 days! I honestly wouldnt do it any other way. a ton of cat sites recommend it, this site does, humane society, vets recommend it, etc. So Ill go with the words of the pro's
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
It seems you have had unusual experiences. This is not the norm when separating cats during introductions.


Trixie, you handled the introduction very well. As most of us here at TCS will agree, it is best to do gradual introductions. When Mika came into our life she was easily 1/2 the size of Bijou and for us to leave them together unsupervised would have been more cruel on our part IMO. We did a very slow introduction (4 weeks) with supervised time together before ever leaving them together alone.
Yosemite, you are right. Trixie handled the introduction a heck of a lot better than you apparently did.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by feral65 View Post
Yosemite, you are right. Trixie handled the introduction a heck of a lot better than you apparently did.
Where did that come from?? I don't see any part of Yosemite's post saying she had issues with her introductions.

It's great that your method worked for you and it may very well work for others. However, that doesn't make every method other than yours wrong. All cats are different and not everything method will work the same with every cat.

Please remember that we are here to educate and learn from each other, not to put down others.
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
well, i made a post about about the head way i have made with them, check it out,lol
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