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Outside cats & predators

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure where to post this so if its in the wrong forum please move it for me. I live in an inner suburban area, mostly residential with some open space consisting of a large park, a cemetery and other areas. Turkey buzzards have built a nest on top of a 6 story medical building for a few yrs now. I received an email from our local animal shelter warning that a buzzard was seen snatching up a cat and flying off with it. This just makes me sick thinking about it. Please make your cats indoor cats only. When I got home from work I hugged both of my kitties and was so glad they would always be safe.There are other predators outside, keep your kitties safe.
post #2 of 16
Er.. a buzzard? i find that highly unlikely, as I was under the impression they ate dead animals.

I'd be more worried about stray dogs, foxes, raccoons, possums, hawks, etc.
post #3 of 16
Either way I don't think it matters WHAT animal it is. The point is, your kitties are safer indoors so they won't get eaten, hit by a car, or lost! Everyone has their own opinion (So I don't want to offend anyone by this post) but coming from someone that also lives in a busy city.... it's really risky letting your cats outdoors unless supervised.
post #4 of 16
I saw a woman on E-vet inturns loose her cat to a coyote attack, The poor thing was in so much pain

I'm not mad at the preadtor its just ding its normal thing, i'm upset the owner didn't keep her car indoors or supervisied outdoors. I always supervise Bindi
post #5 of 16
I agree, indoor cats are much safer. I live between two busy streets and cannot ever allow these two out.

About the buzzards, it could be a hawk who looks similar to the buzzard (vultures). Vultures are carrion-eaters, not predators. However, a hawk would have no trouble carrying off a kitten or even a larger cat.

Indoors with lots of love is the best guarantee of a safe kitty

Edit: unless the cat was already dead?
post #6 of 16
a turkey vulture would never ever touch a cat they are not hunters they would be terrified of a cat which looks like a small deadly carnivore in their eyes



Hawks wouldnt dare take on a healthy adult cat the backfire of a 10 pound house cat would be way to deadly for a 2 pound red tailed hawk to handle a golden eagle would do it but they are rare

foxes coons possems are all no problem USUALLY but they are often blamed for what coyotes do, coyotes are sneaky u wont see them ever while u will often see foxes and coons in the backyard

feral cats will often kill a small or young opossem if they get a chance to


COYOTES and fishers are a cats worst nightmare they catch them so easy and kill them so quick...
post #7 of 16
It may be unlikely that a turkey vulture carried off a full-grown cat, but there are lots of raptors (as has been mentioned) in/around the metroparks and some of them are quite capable of making off with a small cat or kitten.

Thanks for the reminder! Here in Ohio we definitely do have lots to worry about when we allow our cats outdoors, because of population density, the various wildlife including large predators, and other reasons. Not safe at all.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chausiefan View Post

coyotes are sneaky u wont see them ever while u will often see foxes and coons in the backyard

COYOTES and fishers are a cats worst nightmare they catch them so easy and kill them so quick...
Quick question about coyotes ....... will they approach humans? If I am in my backyard and there are coyotes in the vicinity, would they ever sneak up on me and eat me?
post #9 of 16
no they are not usually dangerous 2 people theere have been attacks fatal ones on kids ONly but not adults you should be more cautious of stray dogs which are much more dangerous to us. COyotes usually cringe at the site of us because we usually get in the way of their hunting parties. When we see a fox or a coon we usually go awww cute but a big german shepherd sized coyote usually causes us to make a lot of noise so they avoid people as much as possible welll here at least.

stray dogs usually dont have the ability to catch a smart street cat that can easily esccape by running up a tree or climbing a fence but coyotes are amazing hunters they will stalk a cat and catch kill it before it even know what happened. Fisher will go right up a tree after a cat and kill it in the tree.

them along with fishers are real expert cat & small dog killers very few can escape them once they have started picking cats as their ideal prey source
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pami View Post
Quick question about coyotes ....... will they approach humans? If I am in my backyard and there are coyotes in the vicinity, would they ever sneak up on me and eat me?
Pretty much not. Due to the destruction of their entire ecosystem there have been RARE reports of attacks on humans, but in self-defense and not usually all that harmful to the person involved. No one has been killed by a coyote since 1980, and when the person is harmed it is almost always a child.

Coyotes are definitely much more scared of us than we of them.

The biggest danger comes when people feed them and pretend they're a domestic animal. Treat them like wildlife and you have nothing to worry about.

Pets, on the other hand, should be kept away from coyotes (indoors)

(Jinx ChausieFan, I suppose I owe you a Coke)
post #11 of 16
My cats are all inside safe and sound. I will be moving soon to a new area on a ridge that is wooded. People have said they have heard coyotes from time to time.

I was just wondering about when humans would be in the backyard because I always heard coyotes were opportunist. SO I thought if they smelled food we were grilling, it might bring them close.

We also have a little dog that Im sure will be back there with us too. SO I was just curious if they would approach us. I would never feed a coyote because I know they are wild. I would freak out if he approached us though.
post #12 of 16
when u do see one its best to freak out at them so they keep it in their heads that we should be feared and do not like them, They LOVE to eat dogs that are smaller then themselves but as long as u are with your dog its going to be safe
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chausiefan View Post
when u do see one its best to freak out at them so they keep it in their heads that we should be feared and do not like them, They LOVE to eat dogs that are smaller then themselves but as long as u are with your dog its going to be safe
I have read to always make loud noises to never allow them to feel comfortable. The back patio area is actually a raised area with a retaining wall, so they would have to come up that to get to us, but still.

I will not ever let my little dog (well hes 22 Lbs) roam free back there AT ALL!! Thanks for all the info ......... you too Julie
post #14 of 16
I have 7 farm cats. They are shut in buildings a lot, though. I haven't lost one to any predators.

And, I've had coyotes get pretty close to me, but they never attack. They do not typically go for something a humans size.
post #15 of 16
Even young children can easily scare off a coyote. I had one come up to me when I was 6, and all I had to do was look at it and scream BOO, and it ran off with its tail between its legs.
My cats will always be inside. We've had coyotes and bears break into rabbit pens and kill the rabbits, and I've seen a few mutilated cats. Around here you have to worry about coyotes, bears(which usually don't do anything unless they're really hungry or cranky), foxes, coons, eagles, and those crazy muskrats(if a cat corners them)Its just so much safer to keep the animals inside.
post #16 of 16
This is a good reminders for people that live in areas that are obviously dangerous to cats. Whether that be from traffic, predators etc.

I'd like to share my views on this matter as I know I am certainly in the minority, as I do let my cats go out. I have two that are seniors and both over 13yrs of age, a toddler and a baby.

Please remember - I do not think it is wrong for people to keep their cat indoors at all, I understand and totally accept the reasons

My stance is that they learn about dangers - maybe this would be a good question for Kelly our Cat Behaviorists - yes they get into trouble and some of you will know Miss Moofs got in a bad cat-fight, this is where I help, if she was a feral she would have probably gone blind and/or died from infection. So of course she had vet treatment. I can honestly say if it was worse and she had to loose her eye and/or died, then whilst I'd be very, very upset, it wouldn't change how I feel about letting my cats out. I have had a cat killed by a car, so I know how that feels.

I like my cats to have what I think is the best of both worlds, a bit of the wild and a bit of the home comforts.

Lets look at possible predators - stuff I found on the net. I'd also like to say this is only about adult cats - kittens are completely different.

Foxes Foxes are omnivores, which means they eat both meat and plants. They mostly eat small mammals and wounded birds, and are not above scrounging a meal from a garbage can if the pickings seem safe.
Foxes rarely attack dogs or cats - because they are noisy and likely to attract attention. Usually foxes and cats have a mutual respect for one another. A female fox will chase a cat away from her cubs, this can be mistaken for the fox chasing a cat for a kill. Likewise, if a fox finds a dead cat on the road it will take it away to eat, this could be again mistaken for the fox killing the cat. They may take a kitten, but as mentioned above this is about adult cats.

Coyotes I think these are the biggest problems for outdoor kitties. They opportunistic and will eat almost anything available. Small mammals such as mice, voles, shrews, rabbits, hares, and squirrels are preferred foods. However, insects, fruits, berries, birds, frogs, snakes, plants, and seeds round out their diet. In areas with high deer numbers, carrion resulting from vehicle-deer collisions and natural causes. In urban areas, coyotes are attracted to garbage, garden vegetables, and pet food. They will also prey on unattended small dogs and cats, if opportunities exist. Some coyotes learn to kill smaller livestock, such as sheep, goats, calves and poultry.

Turkey Vultures - do not feed strictly on carrion. This bird enjoys plants, including shoreline vegetation, pumpkin, and bits of other crops. The are extremely unaggressive and non-confrontational, the Turkey vulture will not feed on live prey. The may attack sick or dying animals, which of course could include a cat

Bears- bears are omnivores and eat a diet such as grasses, berries, water plants, elk & moose calves, small rodents, and some insects. Whilst I suppose they "could" eat a cat it looks like there own sources of food is well supplied.

Raccoons are omnivores, generally speaking, coons like peanuts, sweets, fruits, bread, peanut butter, and especially cat and dog food. The will also scavenge dead animals of any size. Raccoons most likely will scavenge on pets that have already died.

Cats can get into skirmishes with all of these animals, but this is rare as in most cases both animals would keep there distance from each other, this is how the natural world works. They also have the weapons they need for these skirmishes.

They are good at safety behaviours and will try to get up high to keep safe, or keep still, or hide if in danger. They will scent mark their territory with urine, claw marks and sometimes faeces if they feel threatened.

I'm going to leave it there, but there is tons more stuff on the net about this and I am sure this issue of indoor/outdoor will rattle on for a while and I am happy to offer the other view of the debate
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