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Anyone like German food? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwideus View Post
Whats worse is that they are always making it in the microbiology lab for some of the students because of the microbes involved in making it. It is not pleasant when you are trying to study!
I hate the smell of it! Dad used to make it a lot when I was a kid. He also made this weird hard-boiled egg in beet juice, with rings of raw onion, all marinating in the fridge. I think it was a German dish. God, it looked DISGUSTING when you opened the fridge door, especially in the middle of the night!

MargeCat
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwideus View Post
I love bratwurst but I don't care much for schnitzel.

As for sauerkraut, I HATE the stuff. I hate the smell of it as well.
My mother cooks polish sausage and sauerkraut for dinner every now and then. OMG! Just the smell makes me nauseaus. If I can smell it when I get out of my car at their house, I'll just get right back into my car and go home. I also can't stand ruben sandwich day in the cafeteria for the same reason. I just can't get past the smell!!!
post #33 of 51
I've never encountered an ethnic food I didn't like.

My husband's family is German and Polish so when they have holidays it's a mix of the two. Normally someone has to roll me out the door!
post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
You sure can! We've got a spare bedroom, and have the "castle/cathedral tour" down pat. Jamie isn't too friendly with visitors, though, as Fran (fwan) can attest.
I'll be right over! I'll bring lots of treats to distract kitty

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie-poo View Post
My mother cooks polish sausage and sauerkraut for dinner every now and then. OMG! Just the smell makes me nauseaus. If I can smell it when I get out of my car at their house, I'll just get right back into my car and go home. I also can't stand ruben sandwich day in the cafeteria for the same reason. I just can't get past the smell!!!
Oh that sounds YUMMY!


To clarify - the "pancake" we had was a potato pancake. Similar to american "hash brown patty" but there was definitely flour or something added to make it fluffy instead of just potato and something else, onions maybe? There isn't anywhere here that serves German breakfast so no idea what kind of stuff they might have.
post #35 of 51
My first job out of college was waitressing at a german restaurant, I learned a real appreciation for some dishes...yummy! I especially like beef rouladen, and jaeger schnitzel.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat & Alix View Post
I especially like beef rouladen
that is one of my hubby's favorite dishes. one of these days i have to get my MIL's recipe for it.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchess15 View Post
I did not mean any offense in any way. Many dishes can vary from one region to the next in Germany. I was only referring to the region my family is from.
Do they have "Flädlesuppe" there? That's something I've found a bit weird. They make thin pancakes, cut them into strips, and serve them in beef broth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchess15 View Post
It does, but if you are referring to the one with the coconut frosting, it's not the real german chocolate cake. I didn't know this until my mom told me it wasn't authentic!
Actually, they don't use too much in the way of frosting here. Whipped cream, a glaze, or even Nutella are more usual, so your mom is right. I think a lot of people think of Black Forest Cake as the "real" German chocolate cake here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlleyGirl View Post
To clarify - the "pancake" we had was a potato pancake. Similar to american "hash brown patty" but there was definitely flour or something added to make it fluffy instead of just potato and something else, onions maybe? There isn't anywhere here that serves German breakfast so no idea what kind of stuff they might have.
That's what's referred to as "Rösti" in this area, as the Swiss expression is used in the Southwest, and "Kartoffelpuffer" elsewhere. Usually grated potatoes, an egg, flour, onions, and sometimes bits of ham or bacon, and served at lunch or dinner, rather than for breakfast.
post #38 of 51
great discussion. I am a "German from Russia" and have eaten all kinds of great German-Russian cuisine. My family lives in the "Sauerkraut Capital of the World", my hometown Wishek, North Dakota. Once a year, in October, people come from far and wide to eat sauerkraut and wieners..go figure!
I also enjoy:
Kuchen - custard like pie that can be filled with prunes, cream cheese, etc
Pan-Kuchen - kinda like frybread..
dumplings - nice and fluffy, best served with creamed chicken
streudels - I like these slightly fluffy with gravy
halva - is this a german thing? has anyone else had this? it's a small brick of something tasty and sweet..
knephla soup
Some weird food items that I do not like and may or may not be German in origin are: tiger meat (raw meat with STRONG spices), and blood sausage.
I am trying to remember the name of a hamburger dish where the hamburger is wrapped up in fried dough..I will post if I remember..
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Do they have "Flädlesuppe" there? That's something I've found a bit weird. They make thin pancakes, cut them into strips, and serve them in beef broth.


Actually, they don't use too much in the way of frosting here. Whipped cream, a glaze, or even Nutella are more usual, so your mom is right. I think a lot of people think of Black Forest Cake as the "real" German chocolate cake here.

That's what's referred to as "Rösti" in this area, as the Swiss expression is used in the Southwest, and "Kartoffelpuffer" elsewhere. Usually grated potatoes, an egg, flour, onions, and sometimes bits of ham or bacon, and served at lunch or dinner, rather than for breakfast.
I've heard Flaedlesuppe, but not something our family makes or ever heard them mention. I'm not sure where that might be served. You are correct about the frosting. Frosting over here is way too sweet and full of sugar. I can't really eat much of it.
The bakeries are always full of different pasteries and cakes. Their whipped cream is very light, and can you hardly taste any sugar. They also use a lot of different fruit in their cake or even poppyseed in "Mohnkuchen" which is poppy seed cake and one of my favorites!
In addition to types of pancakes, I just recalled a few dishes that our family does make. There are two types that I know of, but I'm sure there many others out there. The first one is Eierpfannkuchen. Basically it is an egg pancake. Just take about 5-6 eggs mix them together like you would an omelette and fry it on both sides. We add sliced ham into it chopped up into squares. We normally eat this on german bread with butter.
Another one is called Bauernfruehstueck. Which means farmer's breakfast. It's very similar to the egg pancake. The only addition is adding sliced cooked potatoes to it and frying on both sides. Served the same way as the other one above.
Kartoffelpuffer are what I am used to eating. A lot of the times we just get the Panni pack and make them that way.
In the stores over here, there is a company that makes a boxed cake mix called german chocolate cake which comes with the coconut frosting and this is what many people think is german chocolate cake, but it's not.
post #40 of 51
I love just about any food, will try anything, and at least like most of it. German food is wonderful. It can be heavy, but heavy is not necessarily bad, but a matter of what you feel like eating at any given time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadie's Mom View Post
I love spaetzle!
So do I. So. Do. I. Tricia -- thanks for putting the Spaetzle recipe in Cattitude. The beating is a killer, but eventually I'll get my arm used to it. Rob loves 'em too.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchess15 View Post
I've heard Flaedlesuppe, but not something our family makes or ever heard them mention. I'm not sure where that might be served. I actually think it's a southern German thing, meaning Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg.You are correct about the frosting. Frosting over here is way too sweet and full of sugar. I can't really eat much of it.
The bakeries are always full of different pasteries and cakes. Their whipped cream is very light, and can you hardly taste any sugar. They also use a lot of different fruit in their cake or even poppyseed in "Mohnkuchen" which is poppy seed cake and one of my favorites! Oh, wow, Mohnkuchen. That's one dessert I have a weakness for.
In addition to types of pancakes, I just recalled a few dishes that our family does make. There are two types that I know of, but I'm sure there many others out there. The first one is Eierpfannkuchen. Basically it is an egg pancake. Just take about 5-6 eggs mix them together like you would an omelette and fry it on both sides. We add sliced ham into it chopped up into squares. We normally eat this on german bread with butter.
Another one is called Bauernfruehstueck. Which means farmer's breakfast. It's very similar to the egg pancake. The only addition is adding sliced cooked potatoes to it and frying on both sides. Served the same way as the other one above.
Kartoffelpuffer are what I am used to eating. A lot of the times we just get the Panni pack and make them that way.You can get Pfanni there?
In the stores over here, there is a company that makes a boxed cake mix called german chocolate cake which comes with the coconut frosting and this is what many people think is german chocolate cake, but it's not.German chocolate cake, as advertised in the U.S., seems to be unknown here. Other than Black Forest Cake/Donau Welle (Danube wave, which says nothing), the closest I can come up with is "Sachertorte", which is Austrian.
My message is apparently too short to post, since I've added comments to your quoted post.
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvslive View Post
great discussion. I am a "German from Russia" and have eaten all kinds of great German-Russian cuisine. My family lives in the "Sauerkraut Capital of the World", my hometown Wishek, North Dakota. Once a year, in October, people come from far and wide to eat sauerkraut and wieners..go figure!
I also enjoy:
Kuchen - custard like pie that can be filled with prunes, cream cheese, etc
Pan-Kuchen - kinda like frybread..
dumplings - nice and fluffy, best served with creamed chicken
streudels - I like these slightly fluffy with gravy
halva - is this a german thing? has anyone else had this? it's a small brick of something tasty and sweet..
knephla soup
Some weird food items that I do not like and may or may not be German in origin are: tiger meat (raw meat with STRONG spices), and blood sausage.
I am trying to remember the name of a hamburger dish where the hamburger is wrapped up in fried dough..I will post if I remember..
Kuchen in German means Cake, so i really dont know which one youre reffering to!!
Stuedels with gravy? over here they mostly have apfel struedels with ice cream! what a horrible image in my head of apple strudels with gravy on top!
Met Broetchen (raw meat with spices) Is only nice if made correctly by butchers. To be honest I would never eat it in another country unless it was made by a real german
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
My message is apparently too short to post, since I've added comments to your quoted post.
I've had that happen before! Yes, Pfanni...I obviously couldn't spell that day either. We have it available in our local grocery store and can find it at the Commissary (U.S. army base version of grocery store).
We are very fortunate to have a German Deli here in North Texas and I stumbled upon it by accident searching for german food online. It's www.germandeli.com. I sure miss the bakeries though. I love Mohnkuchen and Schwarzwaelderkuchen. The real one! My uncle is a baker so he can do it all and made me one the first time I went back to visit in 8 years.
post #44 of 51
http://www.lib.ndsu.nodak.edu/grhc/o...elutheran.html

Here's the link to my hometown church's cookbook with a list of common foods. They call the kuchen "wedding kuchen" if that helps the translation.
post #45 of 51
I liked a lot of the snitzels(sp). There was one I really liked that was covered with a thin sauce that had a lot of mushrooms in it. I think the translation for that one was hunter's snitzel. There was a truck that came through our neighborhood every morning with fresh bread and pastries. I really liked the hard crusty rolls with real butter. That and coffee seemed to be the breakfast that a lot of Germans ate on weekday mornings.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denice View Post
I liked a lot of the snitzels(sp). There was one I really liked that was covered with a thin sauce that had a lot of mushrooms in it. I think the translation for that one was hunter's snitzel. There was a truck that came through our neighborhood every morning with fresh bread and pastries. I really liked the hard crusty rolls with real butter. That and coffee seemed to be the breakfast that a lot of Germans ate on weekday mornings.
It's called Jaegerschnitzel and that's also one of my favorites.
post #47 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchess15 View Post
It's called Jaegerschnitzel and that's also one of my favorites.
The one I had was pork cutlets, and had apple and onion on top with melted cheese. Any idea what its called? I'd like to look up a recipe but can't remember!
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchess15 View Post
I've had that happen before! Yes, Pfanni...I obviously couldn't spell that day either. We have it available in our local grocery store and can find it at the Commissary (U.S. army base version of grocery store).
We are very fortunate to have a German Deli here in North Texas and I stumbled upon it by accident searching for german food online. It's www.germandeli.com. I sure miss the bakeries though. I love Mohnkuchen and Schwarzwaelderkuchen. The real one! My uncle is a baker so he can do it all and made me one the first time I went back to visit in 8 years.
I was really lucky when we were living in Philadelphia. Just a few blocks away there was a real "Conditorei", with a "Bäckermeister" from Baden-Württemberg, so we could always get terrific bread and cakes. I went to school with his daughters, and after moving here, I met his family (siblings) quite by accident in a restaurant. Small world, isn't it?

My parents and brother always practically lived on bread and rolls when they visited us here. My mom, who doesn't speak any German, actually made several trips to the local bakeries herself. When I asked her how she managed, she said, "I just point, and say 'sex'!" (Note to those who don't speak German: "sechs" = six.) She still raves about the "pretzel rolls" (Laugenbrötchen).
post #49 of 51
There is an amazing resturant in my hometown called "Maximillians" it is all german food, they are famous for their "Schnitzel" and sauercraut (sp?) it is very rich food but SSSSOOOO good!
post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
I was really lucky when we were living in Philadelphia. Just a few blocks away there was a real "Conditorei", with a "Bäckermeister" from Baden-Württemberg, so we could always get terrific bread and cakes. I went to school with his daughters, and after moving here, I met his family (siblings) quite by accident in a restaurant. Small world, isn't it?

My parents and brother always practically lived on bread and rolls when they visited us here. My mom, who doesn't speak any German, actually made several trips to the local bakeries herself. When I asked her how she managed, she said, "I just point, and say 'sex'!" (Note to those who don't speak German: "sechs" = six.) She still raves about the "pretzel rolls" (Laugenbrötchen).
too funny but so true!
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
I was really lucky when we were living in Philadelphia. Just a few blocks away there was a real "Conditorei", with a "Bäckermeister" from Baden-Württemberg, so we could always get terrific bread and cakes. I went to school with his daughters, and after moving here, I met his family (siblings) quite by accident in a restaurant. Small world, isn't it?

My parents and brother always practically lived on bread and rolls when they visited us here. My mom, who doesn't speak any German, actually made several trips to the local bakeries herself. When I asked her how she managed, she said, "I just point, and say 'sex'!" (Note to those who don't speak German: "sechs" = six.) She still raves about the "pretzel rolls" (Laugenbrötchen).
Oh my, that is too funny! My high school german teacher never said sechs, because it sounds just like sex, and I would alway correct her on pronunciations.
You were so lucky!! Having such wonderful bakeries and restaurants. We have a bakery nearby and he's moved over here from Germany and the bread I like, but the cakes are not taking right and no Mohnkuchen.
There are not really any good german restaurants close by. There is one about an hour and a half away that I just adore. It is truly authentic german in every way to include the restaurant itself. It is looking like a "german house", the tables, doors, even the toilet is german and I think it was all imported! They owners are very nice and moved over here quite a while back from Germany. When we have a birding trip around that area I always go.
I'd post the picture of it if I could, but since my computer crashed last year, I lost alot, but will post it if I can find it on a cd somewhere.
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