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Protein Question

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
One of my cats has had a weight problem her whole life. I recently switched our dry food to California Natural which has more protein but less calories, fat, and carbs than the food we were feeding. But she gained weight and now can't clean her behind. She is on one meal of wet a day and I am now planning on her going all wet but I just would like to know why would she gain weight on the better food? Is it the higher protein?
post #2 of 14
I don't think it's the protein...but I'm not sure of the answer either.

How much of the California Natural was she eating, or currently eating per day?

How much wet, and what type?

How old is she? How does her current weight compare to where she should be?

Perhaps Sharky can comment on why she would gain despite the lower calories, fat, and carbs...but those questions were the first to come to mind for me.
post #3 of 14
If she was not digesting the "poorer" quality as easily a gain on premium could happen...

what was the previous food as I will check a few % ages...

I suspect old food was lower in fat :0... remember 1 gram of fat has 9 calories regardless of if you a cat or a human ... Protein and Carbohydrates is 1gram= 4 calories but the assimilation rate is different

Remember thou cats are obligate carnivores some of them would need a "Jenny Craig " type diet other s need Atkins
post #4 of 14
My cats gained weight on California Natural and gained even more on EVO. So now I'm trying out a different dry food. Royal Canin Beauty and Fit has 37% protein but is lower in calories than California Natural and it's got fiber for hairballs and fiber is filling for overweight cats. It's not a perfect food but no commercial cat food is perfect. Increasing the wet is supposed to improve the diet anyway. Dry food is just a supplement for cats that don't eat enough wet and for the pet owner who needs to balance between cost and nutrition. Also exercise helps burn calories too.

Fat cats tends to be a big issue for cats that live in apartments and condos such as my cats. But I'm not rich enough to upgrade to a house w/ stairs.

I really think calories gained versus calories burned is the biggest culprit for weight, energy in versus energy out. All dry foods have more calories per ounce than wet foods, even the weight control ones and carbohydrates tend to be fattening too. But then switching to Evo which has the lowest carb content of any dry food caused my cats to gain weight from the calories.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by moggiegirl View Post
Fat cats tends to be a big issue for cats that live in apartments and condos such as my cats. But I'm not rich enough to upgrade to a house w/ stairs.
I hear ya! I used to share a townhouse with a roommate, and Wally got way more exercise just from running up and down the stairs there than he does in my current one-bed apartment.

Kitytize, this may be a silly question, but do you free feed the dry food? Is it possible that she's just eating more of the Cal Nat? I noticed that when Wally switched to Cal Nat, he ate it A LOT quicker than he ate his old food (because it tasted better, I think). I had to be very careful about rationing the portions.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beandip View Post
I don't think it's the protein...but I'm not sure of the answer either.

How much of the California Natural was she eating, or currently eating per day?

How much wet, and what type?

How old is she? How does her current weight compare to where she should be?

Perhaps Sharky can comment on why she would gain despite the lower calories, fat, and carbs...but those questions were the first to come to mind for me.
I was free feeding the CN so it is possible she was eating to much.

Wet she ate about 1oz a day and it is Friskies the ones without wheat gluten

She is 7 years old. Right now she weighs 16 lbs. She is a larger cat to begin with so I am guessing she should weigh 12 lbs. At 14 lbs she was still overweight but could clean her behind.

The funny thing is since March she has been more active so I was shocked with the new food and more activity she still gained weight.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
what was the previous food as I will check a few % ages...
Was feeding her Royal Canin Special 33
post #8 of 14
It appears you actually increased the carbs ...

Old food

Cat Food For Adult Cats From 1 to 10 Years of Age
Prone to Digestive Problems

The Sensitive Cat.
Some adult cats have digestive sensitivities leading to disorders such as soft feces or diarrhea. This sensitivity requires a made-to-measure nutritional answer whose formulation guarantees maximum digestive safety.




(roll over bag to see kibble)
Available in 3.5, 7 and 15 lb. bags


ULTRA ACTI-DIGEST
Ultra strong digestive security from highly digestible protein which limit the concentration of fermentable residual proteins in the intestine, and a high rice content, the most digestible source of carbohydrates.

MICRO-FLORA BALANCE
A supply of fructo-oligo-saccharides and micronized beet pulp to promote balanced intestinal flora.

EXCLUSIVE SAVOR
A unique formulation of high quality ingredients and natural flavors to satisfy the appetite of fussy cats.

TARTAR CONTROL
SENSITIVITY CARE
Improves oral hygiene by reducing the occurrence of tartar deposits on your cat's teeth.




"I just could not believe..."
"The best cat food around"
"You would never guess..."
"Thank you from the bottom of my heart"
"He absolutely loves this food"

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When changing your pet's diet, gradually mix food over a 5-7 day period, increasing daily the amount of new food added so that 100% of the new food will be provided to the pet by day seven.

Food may be served right out of the bag or moistened with water, if desired. You may wish to leave a daily portion of dry cat food out and available at all times so that cats may feed themselves. Always remember to provide your pet with clean, fresh water at all times. For your pet's health, see your veterinarian regularly.

This is only a guide. Optimal feeding amounts may vary with age, temperament, activity level and environment.


RECOMMENDED FEEDING PORTIONS (*CUPS PER DAY)
Body Weight
(lbs.) Underweight
Ideal Weight
Overweight

4 1/4 1/4 -
6 1/2 1/4 -
8 1/2 1/2 -
10 3/4 1/2 1/2
12 - 1/2 1/2
14 - 3/4 1/2

*cup = 8 Fluid Ounces = 111 grams



Calorie Content

This product contains 4289 kilocalories/kilogram or 477 kilocalories per cup ME (metabolizable energy) on an as fed basis (calculated).

100% Complete and Balanced Nutrition for Your Sensitive Cat

Feline Health Nutrition Active Special 33™ Formula for adult cats from 1 to 10 years of age is formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) Cat Food Nutrient Profiles for maintenance.

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein Not less than 33.0%
Crude Fat Not less than 22.0%
Crude Fiber Not more than 4.1%
Moisture Not more than 9.0%

Magnesium Not more than 0.08%
Taurine Not less than 0.21%
Vitamin E Not less than 600 mg/kg
Vitamin C* Not less than 300 mg/kg
Omega 6* Not less than 5.45%
Omega 3* Not less than 0.72%
Ingredients
Chicken meal, chicken fat (naturally preserved with mixed tocopherols, rosemary extract and citric acid), rice, corn gluten meal, corn, chicken, natural chicken flavor, wheat gluten, beet pulp (sugar removed), dried brewers yeast, salmon oil, dried egg powder, soya oil, pea fiber, fructo-oligosaccharides, potassium chloride, calcium sulfate, sodium silico aluminate, DL-methionine, choline chloride, L-lysine, sodium chloride, sodium tripolyphosphate, taurine, Vitamins [dl-alpha tocopherol (source of vitamin E), L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C*), niacin, biotin, riboflavin (vitamin B2), d-calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, folic acid], Trace Minerals [zinc proteinate, zinc oxide, ferrous sulfate, copper proteinate, copper sulfate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, sodium selenite, calcium iodate].
http://www.royalcanin.us/catfood/special.html


New food
Nutritional Facts
Moisture 10.0 %
Protein 36.0 %
Fat 16.0 %
Linoleic Acid 3.0 %
Omega 3 0.30 %
Arachidonic Acid 0.05 0
Carbohydrates 27.27 %
Fiber 3.5 %
Ash 6.43 %

Calcium 1.05 %
Phosphorous 0.79 %
Magnesium
http://www.californianaturalpet.com/...ault.asp?id=72


If I use 6.5 ash the carb s in the RC( not listed so this is a Guess) are 26 % roughly... will Cal natural list 27.27 carbs ... So amazingly she is getting more carbs not alot but she also traded in fat

I can only think she metabolizes fat well ... and possibley is close to needing a "senior formula( RC s are mod protein HIGH fat)
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you Sharky. I also was reading online about fiber for cats. It is not a nutrional value but does have health benefits. I noticed RC has more fiber than CN and I read that fiber can help an obese cat. I did not find much online but I am wondering if maybe fiber is a contributer also.
post #10 of 14
Have you checked her for worms? Many cats gain weight because they have worms in their intestines. The worms make things harder to digest, so the cat ends up over-eating.
post #11 of 14
You need to make sure that no matter what food it is, you measure how much she needs for the day and only give her that, don't put too much in the bowl, because if it is there they will eat it.

And being active is always good
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
She doesn't go outside so I don't know how she would have worms unless she can get it from the dog. But I do have another question since RC has less carbs does that mean it has higher protein from meat than vegetables? So even though RC ingredients show fillers they must be in small amounts? Looks like I am putting the rest of my cats back on RC 33 and the obese cat on canned.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitytize View Post
She doesn't go outside so I don't know how she would have worms unless she can get it from the dog.
While indoor cats can get worms, I think it is highly unlikely in your girl's case. Worms will normally cause a ravenous appetite with weight LOSS or no weight gain. They can also cause a "pot bellied" appearance but not true obesity.

I'm sure Sharky can comment on your other question about the RC.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitytize View Post
Thank you Sharky. I also was reading online about fiber for cats. It is not a nutrional value but does have health benefits. I noticed RC has more fiber than CN and I read that fiber can help an obese cat. I did not find much online but I am wondering if maybe fiber is a contributer also.
A small one since it is less than a %....Usually for it to be a issue one would be 3% and the other say 6%
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitytize View Post
She doesn't go outside so I don't know how she would have worms unless she can get it from the dog. But I do have another question since RC has less carbs does that mean it has higher protein from meat than vegetables? So even though RC ingredients show fillers they must be in small amounts? Looks like I am putting the rest of my cats back on RC 33 and the obese cat on canned.
I dont know about the worms.... since kids"human" can get them from animals I would think cats and dogs could share ... I only know that my vet said two cats using the same potty box couldnt get them from one another that way
RC does have a lot of protein from grains .... but remeber rice is fairly easily digested ... wheat and corn gluten are nothing but plant proteins that do aid balencing UTI health in chicken formulas.... For now all canned would be great if shell go for it ... if not I would suggest RC 27 mature
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